Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to make a 3D plot for these 100 points in X,Y and Z axes. I have generated lists that I require for all 3 axes. I assumed that this should be sufficient to plot a set of points in 3D. However I do not understand the output. I appreciate any kind of help in this regard.

################################################################
# problem : f(x) = (e**(-(y**2)))*cos(3*x)+(e**(x**2))*cos(3*y)
################################################################

from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D
import math
import matplotlib
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

fig = plt.figure()
ax=Axes3D(fig)
x = np.arange(-5,5,1)
y = np.arange(-5,5,1)
X = []
Y = []
Z=[]
for i in range(len(x)):
        for j in range(len(y)):
            z=(np.exp(-(y[j]**2))*np.cos(3*x[i]))+(np.exp(x[i]**2)*np.cos(3*y[j]))
        Z.append(z)
        X.append(x[i])
        Y.append(y[j])
ax.plot(X,Y,Z,'o')
plt.show()

edit/update: I am not sure if my problem is with the code itself or the way i understand 3Dplots, Should I use meshgrids to get a plot that i expect?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Which version of matplotlib do you have? The documentation states that for matplotlib versions 1.0.0 and greater you should create a 3D axes as follows:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='3d')

rather than the ax = Axes3D(fig) used in previous versions.

Edit Following the OPs comment it seems that is the result of the code is not as expected, rather than there being some sort of error. The following code is what I presume is intended

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='3d')

x, y = np.meshgrid(np.linspace(-5., 5., 100), np.linspace(-5., 5., 100))

def zfunc(x, y):
    return np.exp(-(y**2)) * np.cos(3.*x) + np.exp(x**2) * np.cos(3.*y)

z = zfunc(x, y)

ax.plot_surface(x, y, z)

plt.show()

In the above code a two dimensional mesh is created (missing from the original post) and the function is calculated as a function of these two variables and plotted as a surface. Previously just a line of points running along x=y was being plotting.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried both, with the same results .. –  abcd Aug 8 '12 at 13:01
    
Then can you be clearer in your question - why is the output not what you expected? What exactly are you expecting? I have added some code which will plot your function as a function of two variables as a surface. Is this more like what you are expecting? Note that it seems there is a problem with your equation, can you double check that? –  Chris Aug 8 '12 at 13:12
    
Even when the function is plotted on a surface the plot does not appear to be correct..... I tried using your code but it has the same issue (There is no variation in the 3rd axis (z) except at the corners) –  abcd Aug 8 '12 at 14:05
    
Try using numpy.linspace as shown in my edit. The function didn't look right because you had too coarse a mesh. For the function you provided there only is significant variation at the edges of the domain. This is not a problem with your code. See for example wolframalpha.com/input/… –  Chris Aug 8 '12 at 14:16
    
Whoa ! , thanks :) I was expecting something like this -> ece.uwaterloo.ca/~dwharder/NumericalAnalysis/11Optimization/… ( ece.uwaterloo.ca/~dwharder/NumericalAnalysis/11Optimization/…) ( I was assuming that my plot was wrong :/) –  abcd Aug 8 '12 at 16:20
show 2 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.