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I'm using this regular expression:

^\$?([0-9]{1,3},([0-9]{3},)*[0-9]{3}|[0-9]+)(.[0-9][0-9])?$

This regex match for dollar currency amount with comma or without

I want to do match for number between 1000 to 2000 with currency format.

Example:

Match $1,500.00 $2000.0 $1100.20 $1000

Don't match $1,000.0000 $3,000 $2000.1 $4,000 $2500.50

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4  
Checking that a number lies within a range by using a regular expression is a good example of not using the right the tool for the job. Convert the string to a numeric value and use x >= 1000 && x <= 2000. –  Mark Byers Aug 8 '12 at 13:47
2  
Completely agree. If need be, validate first with regex to ensure you have a valid currency figure, then extract the number from it, cast to int/float and range check. –  Adrian Aug 8 '12 at 13:50

2 Answers 2

How about:

/^\$(?:1,?\d{3}(?:\.\d\d?)?|2000(?:\.00?)?)$/

explanation:

 ^                        the beginning of the string
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  \$                       '$'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  (?:                      group, but do not capture:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    1                        '1'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    ,?                       ',' (optional (matching the most amount
                             possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    \d{3}                    digits (0-9) (3 times)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    (?:                      group, but do not capture (optional
                             (matching the most amount possible)):
----------------------------------------------------------------------
      \.                       '.'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
      \d                       digits (0-9)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
      \d?                      digits (0-9) (optional (matching the
                               most amount possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    )?                       end of grouping
----------------------------------------------------------------------
   |                        OR
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    2000                     '2000'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    (?:                      group, but do not capture (optional
                             (matching the most amount possible)):
----------------------------------------------------------------------
      \.                       '.'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
      0                        '0'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
      0?                       '0' (optional (matching the most
                               amount possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    )?                       end of grouping
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  )                        end of grouping
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  $                        before an optional \n, and the end of the
                           string
----------------------------------------------------------------------
)                        end of grouping
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[$]\([1][[:digit:]]\{3\}\|2000\)\(,[[:digit:]]+\|\)

this expression defines this language:

  • dollar followed by 1 xyz or 2000.

  • finally, followed optionally by comma and 1 or more digits

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