Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

does any one know how to get new cross-sections between two known cross-sections? Let me put it in detail: I have several cross-sections(each consists a N*2 matrix, reprensenting the coordinates of the points (X,Y), and each cross-section is related to a certain Z coordinate) of a 3-D object, let's call them controlling cross-sections. but I don't know how to get more cross-sections using the known data. The surface of the 3-D object is supposed to be very smooth, that is, cross-section i changes gradually to the adjacent cross-section i+1 along Z direction.

Any suggestion is appreciated^^

share|improve this question
    
use interp3() mathworks.com/help/techdoc/ref/interp3.html – Dan Aug 8 '12 at 15:22
    
thanks, but interp3 may not be useful in my case. Since the points on each cross-section has the same Z coordinate, and there is no functional relation between different cross-sections. – open0121 Aug 9 '12 at 14:45
    
How can there be no relation between the cross sections if they are cross sections of the same data at different Z values? interp3() does exact;y what you have described above. Perhaps you can post some example inputs and outputs of what you want? Or rephrase the question? – Dan Aug 13 '12 at 6:15
    
They are not cross sections of the same data at different Z values. Every cross sections have its own shape, different from other cross sections. That's why I said "cross-section i changes gradually to the adjacent cross-section i+1 along Z direction". – open0121 Aug 13 '12 at 7:29
    
You also said they are cross sections of a 3D object at different Z-coordinates which implies they are cross sections of a dataset. Of course they can have different shapes, this is not an issue. If you have cross sections of 3D data at defined intervals, and you want to find cross sections at finer intervals, then that is interpolation. Is you data just binary representing where the object is? Because then you could just round off the interpolated values and this will find the intermediate shapes (i.e. cross section of your 3D shape between your control/known cross sections). – Dan Aug 13 '12 at 9:46

First, interpolate controlling cross section points to determine the values on Cartesian grid nodes of the controlling cross section via Delaunay triangulation. Then you can do 1d interpolation between points with the same Cartesian coordinates in x, y, but different in z to get more cross sections

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. I'll try. – open0121 Aug 9 '12 at 8:33
    
"Then you can do 1d interpolation between points with the same Cartesian coordinates in x, y, but different in z to get more cross sections". Ja, Maybe I misunderstood your answer, or I didn't describe my question clear. In fact, I have all the data about the Cartesian coordinates of points on each cross-section. There may be less than 3 points that have the same coordinates in x,y on ajacent cross-sections. And I'm not quite clear why using Delaunay triangulation in my case... could you explain it more clear? Thank you very much! – open0121 Aug 9 '12 at 14:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.