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I have one class that is the below one..

public class DataBaseDAO { 
    private DataBaseDAO() { }
        public static synchronized DataBaseDAO getInstance() {
            if (dao == null) {
                dao = new DataBaseDAO();
                }
            return dao;
            }
        }
    }

Now this getinstance() method can be hacked: In other words this singleton can be hacked and more objects could be created.

How can I make this secure?
This can be broken through reflection, classloaders and deserilizaton.
Should I go for synchronized block instead of putting synchronization on whole method?
Will it make impact on the performance?

Thanks folks ,actually I don't want to introduce the new enum since in existing structure then many changes will take place , I was looking how can I IMPROVE THE EXISTING SINGLETON WITH THE CURRENT APPROACH OF WITHIN CLASS ITSELF..!!

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2  
    
[Enum is the best way to implement singleton in Java.][1] NOTE: Singletons are generally considered a bad practice. [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/70689/… –  Pangea Aug 8 '12 at 15:12
    
And dont put your getInstance method in the constructor, because this way it doesn't compile –  bali182 Aug 8 '12 at 15:13
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do much the same more securely with

public enum DataBaseDAO { 
    INSTANCE
}

e.g. You can use reflection to use a private constructor with setAccessible(true) but not create a new enum instance.

Instead of

DataBaseDAO.getInstance().whateverMethod()

you can use

DataBaseDAO.INSTANCE.whateverMethod()
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1  
Could you please explain it as in my design the singleton is returning dao..!1 –  user1582269 Aug 8 '12 at 16:13
1  
Added an example. Sometimes its so simple you can miss it. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Aug 8 '12 at 17:05
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Actually you should not worry about getting your singleton hacked. Generally singletons are considered a bad (outdated) design practice (they tend to get in the way sonner or later, cause scalability issues and make testing needlessly complicated).

You have defined a clear access method, its not your responsibility (as designer or programmer) to prevent the clever hacker going out of his way to abuse your singleton. There are project guidelines to prevent this.

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You need to use with Double-checked locking, Singleton pattern check this links :

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-dcl/index.html

http://onjavahell.blogspot.co.il/2009/04/uses-of-singleton-design-pattern-in.html

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2  
Why does he need to use Double-checked locking, Singleton pattern? –  maba Aug 8 '12 at 15:15
    
That pattern is only a performance improvement when you don't want to have the whole method synchronized. It doesn't secure the class any more than it is already secured. –  tibtof Aug 8 '12 at 15:17
    
You are right, it is not connected to reflection, classloaders and deserilizaton... the question related to PARANOID ENGINEERING ... I send an answer to other question ... (how to create working Singleton in multithreaded env.) –  prilia Aug 8 '12 at 15:18
    
It's 2012, not 2002 we have enums and static holder idiom! –  Boris Treukhov Aug 8 '12 at 15:31
    
can you send some links for example, pls. –  prilia Aug 8 '12 at 15:32
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The following 3 approaches are all safe, the first two through the class loading mechanism, the last one through synchronization.

Also you cannot protect yourself from Reflection unless you use SecurityManagers and I think that is pretty complicated.

Another Note: Don't use Singletons ;-P

class YourClass
{
    public static final YourClass instance = new YourClass();
}

// or

class YourClass2
{
    private static final YourClass2 instance = new YourClass2();

    public static synchronized YourClass2 getInstance()
    {
        return instance;
    }
}

// or

class YourClass3
{
    private static YourClass3 instance;

    public static synchronized YourClass3 getInstance()
    {
        if (instance == null)
            instance = new YourClass3();
        return instance;
    }
}
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