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Karva notation is used in Gene Expression Programming to represent mathematical expressions.

See here http://www.gene-expression-programming.com/Tutorial002.asp

You create an expression tree by reading the off the gene and filling in nodes from left to right, top to bottom.

So for example using the operators ( +, * ) and terminals (1,2,3,4,5,6) in "+*+1+2*3456" would evaluate to 39.

How would I do this in haskell using attoparsec (or parsec)?

karvaParser :: Parser Int
karvaParser = ????????????

Prelude> parse karvaParser "+*+1+2*3456"
Done 39
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5  
Have you read any tutorials on parsec? This post will probably be closed as your question as it stands is really "how do I use parsec?". –  jberryman Aug 8 '12 at 16:50
    
Well I understand the basics and thought this would be trivial. But its been bugging me. Was just looking for some insight or hints. Its a legitimate question on how to parse karva notation. –  michael.mcclintock Aug 8 '12 at 18:00
3  
Take a look at my related answer here: stackoverflow.com/a/6963984/125421 –  Nathan Howell Aug 8 '12 at 18:19
    
Please don't ask us to write your code for you. There are many excellent resources available online for getting started with Parsec, if that's what you need. If not, show us what you tried and tell us why it didn't work. –  Daniel Wagner Aug 8 '12 at 20:22
    
Spoiler: parsec is not the simplest way to parse breadth first tree like Karva notation. Look at link in comment by @NathanHowell above. –  Chris Kuklewicz Aug 8 '12 at 21:12

1 Answer 1

(I've proved this is a linear time algorithm in this answer to the question mentioned in the comments. There's a lengthier more hand-rolled solution in a previous revision of this answer.)

Gene Expression Programming: Karva notation.

There's probably a neat solution using the continuation passing monad, Cont, but I haven't thought of it. Here's a fairly clean pure functional solution to the problem. I'll take the opportunity to name drop some good general recursion schemes along the way.

Plan:

  1. split the input into lists, one for each layer, using the total arity of the previous line. This is an anamorphism, i.e. grows a list from a seed ([]) and can be written using unfoldr :: (b -> Maybe (a, b)) -> b -> [a] or equivalently, unfoldr' :: (b -> (a, b)) -> (b -> Bool)-> b -> [a]

    input:   "Q/a*+b-cbabaccbac"
    arities:  12022020000000000
    output:  ["Q","/","a*","+b","-c","ba"]
    
  2. Recursively use splitAt to glue the children under the parent. This is a catamorphism, i.e. collapses a list down to a single (tree) value, and can be written using foldr :: (a -> b -> b) -> b -> [a] -> b

  3. Combine the anamorphism and the catamorphism into one. That's called a hylomorphism. These terms are introduced to the FP community in the seminal paper Functional Programming with Bananas, Lenses and Barbed wire.

Code

In case you're not familiar with it, Data.Tree supplies data Tree a = Node {rootLabel :: a, subForest :: Forest a} where type Forest a = [Tree a].

import Data.Tree
import Data.Tree.Pretty -- from the pretty-tree package

arity :: Char -> Int
arity c 
  | c `elem` "+*-/" = 2
  | c `elem` "Q" = 1
  | otherwise = 0

hylomorphism :: b -> (a -> b -> b) -> (c -> (a, c)) -> (c -> Bool) -> c -> b
hylomorphism base combine pullout stop seed = hylo seed where
 hylo s | stop s = base
        | otherwise = combine new (hylo s') 
          where (new,s') = pullout s

To pull out a level, we use the total arity from the previous level to find where to split off this new level, and pass on the total arity for this one ready for next time:

pullLevel :: (Int,String) -> (String,(Int,String))
pullLevel (n,cs) = (level,(total, cs')) where
                   (level,        cs') = splitAt n cs
                   total = sum $ map arity level

To combine a level (as a String) with the level below (that's already a Forest), we just pull off the number of trees that each character needs.

combineLevel :: String -> Forest Char -> Forest Char
combineLevel "" [] = []
combineLevel (c:cs) levelBelow = Node c subforest : combineLevel cs theRest 
      where (subforest,theRest) = splitAt (arity c) levelBelow

Now we can parse the Karva using a hylomorphism. Note that we seed it with a total arity from outside the string of 1, since there's only one node at the root level. I've used the head function because that 1 causes the top level to be a list containing one tree.

karvaToTree :: String -> Tree Char
karvaToTree cs = let
  zero (n,_) = n == 0          
    in head $ hylomorphism [] combineLevel pullLevel zero (1,cs) 

Demo

Let's have a draw of the results (because Tree is so full of syntax it's hard to read the output!). You have to cabal install pretty-tree to get Data.Tree.Pretty.

see :: Tree Char -> IO ()
see = putStrLn.drawVerticalTree.fmap (:"")
ghci> arity '+'
2

ghci> pullLevel (3,"+a*bc/acb")
("+a*",(4,"bc/acb"))

ghci> combineLevel "a*" [Node 'b' [],Node 'c' []]
[Node {rootLabel = 'a', subForest = []},Node {rootLabel = '*', subForest = [Node {rootLabel = 'b', subForest = []},Node {rootLabel = 'c', subForest = []}]}]

ghci> see . Node '.' $ combineLevel "a*" [Node 'b' [],Node 'c' []]
   .   
   |   
 ---   
/   \  
a   *  
    |  
    -- 
   /  \
   b  c

ghci> karvaToTree "Q/a*+b-cbabaccbac"
Node {rootLabel = 'Q', subForest = [Node {rootLabel = '/', subForest = [Node {rootLabel = 'a', subForest = []},Node {rootLabel = '*', subForest = [Node {rootLabel = '+', subForest = [Node {rootLabel = '-', subForest = [Node {rootLabel = 'b', subForest = []},Node {rootLabel = 'a', subForest = []}]},Node {rootLabel = 'c', subForest = []}]},Node {rootLabel = 'b', subForest = []}]}]}]}

Which matches
http://www.gepsoft.com/gxpt4kb/Chapter06/section3/pt02.gif as we see when we see it:

ghci> see $ karvaToTree "Q/a*+b-cbabaccbac"
      Q      
      |      
      /      
      |      
 ------      
/      \     
a      *     
       |     
       ----- 
      /     \
      +     b
      |      
     ----    
    /    \   
    -    c   
    |        
    --       
   /  \      
   b  a  

Eval

Once you have a Tree, it's easy to convert it to other things. Let's evaluate an expression in Karva notation:

action :: (Read num,Floating num) => Char -> [num] -> num
action c = case c of
   'Q' -> sqrt.head
   '+' -> sum
   '*' -> product
   '-' -> \[a,b] -> a - b
   '/' -> \[a,b] -> a / b
   v -> const (read (v:""))

eval :: (Read num,Floating num)  => Tree Char -> num
eval (Node c subforest) = action c (map eval subforest)
ghci> see $ karvaToTree "Q+-*826/12"
      Q      
      |      
      +      
      |      
  -------    
 /       \   
 -       *   
 |       |   
 --    ---   
/  \  /   \  
8  2  6   /  
          |  
          -- 
         /  \
         1  2

ghci> eval $ karvaToTree "Q+-*826/12"
3.0
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