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Got a question salting passwords in sql:

The code below salts a particular password by randomly generating a 10 character string:

Update Teacher 
SET    TeacherSalt = SUBSTRING(MD5(RAND()), -10), 
       TeacherPassword = SHA1(CONCAT('009b9b624aaecc4b3217dcd4bfee15ab704745d7',SUBSTRING(MD5(RAND()), -10)))
WHERE TeacherPassword = '009b9b624aaecc4b3217dcd4bfee15ab704745d7'

But what my question is that I want to change the salt so that the string it is generating comes from all of these characters:

./ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789

There are 63 characters. The php way of doing this is below:

$salt = ""; 
for ($i = 0; $i < 40; $i++) { 
   $salt .= substr(
     "./ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789", 
     mt_rand(0, 63), 
     1); 
}

But how can I write this in the sql way above?

share
4  
I could be wrong, but I'm pretty sure the value stored in TeacherSalt and the actual salt being used to create the TeacherPassword aren't equivalent. –  nickb Aug 8 '12 at 16:57
3  
Note that the sha1() algo is a pretty weak algo for password hashing (because it is fast among other things). –  PeeHaa Aug 8 '12 at 17:01
1  
Yes, I'm saying that you're executing this: SUBSTRING(MD5(RAND()), -10) twice, and you won't get the same value back each time. You need to save the salt, so you cannot get rid of the TeacherSalt column. It would be easier to just generate the salt in PHP. –  nickb Aug 8 '12 at 17:04
3  
@user1394925 noooooooooooooooooooooo ;) MD5 is utterly broken. use bcrypt –  PeeHaa Aug 8 '12 at 17:05
3  
My advice...don't... Use PHP and crypt / bcrypt to create your hash and check with PHP to see if it matches later. You are using a very old algo to encrpyt with and it is not recommended to use it anymore. –  Cody Covey Aug 8 '12 at 17:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you really want to salt randomly than it can be done only by generating the random salt with php and encrypting the password with that salt and storing both salt key and password in two fields of the table. Table must have salt field and password field. However if you just want to use mysql to do encryption than have a look in here http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en//encryption-functions.html

When we validate a user's login credentials we follow the same process, only this time we use the salt from our database instead of generating a new random one. We add the user supplied password to it, run our hashing algorithm, then compare the result with the hash stored in that user's profile.

The links below may give you some more ideas.

How do you securely store a user's password and salt in MySQL?

Where do you store your salt strings?

How insecure is a salted SHA1 compared to a salted SHA512

Salt Generation and open source software

I hope you got the idea now.

share
    
-1. PASSWORD is encryption, and passwords should always be hashed. The docs even explicitly state that this function should NOT be used in other applications. And passwords must be salted. There is absolutely a need to salt passwords, and the salt must not be hard-coded or constant. A hardcoded salt value is a useless salt value. –  Adam Robinson Oct 22 '12 at 3:18
    
@AdamRobinson I do agree that passwords have to be hashed when storing and I didn't realize the issue with PASSWORD() encryption in mysql until now. Thanks for highlighting that. I have revised the answer. I hope you can vote up. :) –  Raf Oct 22 '12 at 8:27

It can be done in MySQL. The random word generation is not as pretty though. Regarding generating and applying the salts, that part isn't hard.

Use 2 statements to first generate salts for everyone, then apply them. (Note: if you really only want to apply it to one account, then add a WHERE clause.)

mysql> select * from salty;
+------+------+------+
| id   | pw   | salt |
+------+------+------+
|    1 | fish | NULL |
|    2 | bird | NULL |
|    3 | fish | NULL |
+------+------+------+

(Note that user 1 & 3 happen to have the same password. But you don't want them to be the same once salted and hashed.)

mysql> update salty set salt=SUBSTRING(MD5(RAND()), -10);

mysql> select * from salty;
+------+------+------------+
| id   | pw   | salt       |
+------+------+------------+
|    1 | fish | 00fe747c35 |
|    2 | bird | ee4a049076 |
|    3 | fish | 6a8285f03c |
+------+------+------------+

(Note: I'll show the specific-alphabet version later)

mysql> update salty set pw=sha1(concat(pw,salt));

mysql> select * from salty;
+------+------------------------------------------+------------+
| id   | pw                                       | salt       |
+------+------------------------------------------+------------+
|    1 | ac1b74c36b4d2426460562e8710bd467bd034fc8 | 00fe747c35 |
|    2 | d63d035f9cac1ac7c237774613b8b702d8c227df | ee4a049076 |
|    3 | 6a0b1e36f489ef959badf91b3daca87d207fb5de | 6a8285f03c |
+------+------------------------------------------+------------+

There you have in two statements, each row uniquely salted and hashed.

Now for randomly generating words of a specified alphabet, there's an ugly trick with ELT(). For a 10-letter word of a 64-character alphabet:

UPDATE salty SET salt=CONCAT(
  ELT(1+FLOOR(RAND()*64), 
  '.','/',
  'A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K','L','M','N','O','P','Q','R','S','T','U','V','W','X','Y','Z',
  'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m','n','o','p','q','r','s','t','u','v','w','x','y','z',
  '0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'),
  ELT(1+FLOOR(RAND()*64), 
  '.','/',
  'A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K','L','M','N','O','P','Q','R','S','T','U','V','W','X','Y','Z',
  'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m','n','o','p','q','r','s','t','u','v','w','x','y','z',
  '0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'),
  ELT(1+FLOOR(RAND()*64), 
  '.','/',
  'A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K','L','M','N','O','P','Q','R','S','T','U','V','W','X','Y','Z',
  'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m','n','o','p','q','r','s','t','u','v','w','x','y','z',
  '0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'),
  ELT(1+FLOOR(RAND()*64),  
  '.','/',
  'A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K','L','M','N','O','P','Q','R','S','T','U','V','W','X','Y','Z',
  'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m','n','o','p','q','r','s','t','u','v','w','x','y','z',
  '0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'),
  ELT(1+FLOOR(RAND()*64), 
  '.','/',
  'A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K','L','M','N','O','P','Q','R','S','T','U','V','W','X','Y','Z',
  'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m','n','o','p','q','r','s','t','u','v','w','x','y','z',
  '0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'),
  ELT(1+FLOOR(RAND()*64), 
  '.','/',
  'A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K','L','M','N','O','P','Q','R','S','T','U','V','W','X','Y','Z',
  'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m','n','o','p','q','r','s','t','u','v','w','x','y','z',
  '0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'),
  ELT(1+FLOOR(RAND()*64), 
  '.','/',
  'A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K','L','M','N','O','P','Q','R','S','T','U','V','W','X','Y','Z',
  'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m','n','o','p','q','r','s','t','u','v','w','x','y','z',
  '0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'),
  ELT(1+FLOOR(RAND()*64), 
  '.','/',
  'A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K','L','M','N','O','P','Q','R','S','T','U','V','W','X','Y','Z',
  'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m','n','o','p','q','r','s','t','u','v','w','x','y','z',
  '0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'),
  ELT(1+FLOOR(RAND()*64), 
  '.','/',
  'A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K','L','M','N','O','P','Q','R','S','T','U','V','W','X','Y','Z',
  'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m','n','o','p','q','r','s','t','u','v','w','x','y','z',
  '0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'),
  ELT(1+FLOOR(RAND()*64), 
  '.','/',
  'A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K','L','M','N','O','P','Q','R','S','T','U','V','W','X','Y','Z',
  'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m','n','o','p','q','r','s','t','u','v','w','x','y','z',
  '0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9')
)

mysql> select * from salty;
+------+------+------------+
| id   | pw   | salt       |
+------+------+------------+
|    1 | fish | TzHO0e5I/k |
|    2 | bird | 65xLptoDZ3 |
|    3 | fish | JNok/SfmkG |
+------+------+------------+    

Hideous, isn't it? But doing that in a single MySQL statement may be much quicker than looping through in PHP and making one (or two) queries per row, especially if you have to apply it to a table with millions of records; a single ugly query vs making millions of queries one at a time.

But as the others say, SHA1 really isn't a good enough hash anymore.

If you do have a lot of records, it might make sense to use a couple of MySQL queries like that to update all the records to use SHA2 as an interim solution, then individually update them to stronger hashes over the course of time using PHP. You'd need some way to know which hash a given record used, of course.

As a side note, if you are only updating a single row (as in your example), then you could perhaps use a MySQL variable to temporarily hold the random generated string long enough to update two columns of the row:

mysql> SET @salt=SUBSTRING(MD5(RAND()), -10); UPDATE salty SET salt=@salt,pw=SHA1(CONCAT(pw,@salt)) WHERE id=2; SET @salt=NULL;

That way the same value in @salt is used for both setting salt and in the pw calculation. It won't work for an update of multiple rows though (they'd all end up with the same salt).

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To put it simply, work it out in php. First grab the information from your table (note, use auto-incrementing IDs rather than the password - which might not be unique - to pick your row)

     function makeMeASalt($max=40){
         $i = 0;
         $salt = "";
         $characterList = "./ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789"
         while ($i < $max) {
            $salt .= $characterList{mt_rand(0, (strlen($characterList) - 1))};
            $i++;
         }
         return $salt;
     }

     $hash=crypt($password.makeMeASalt(40))

     $query="Update Teacher 
         SET TeacherSalt = '".$salt."', TeacherPassword = ".$hash."
         WHERE TeacherID = '".$teacherid."'";
     mysql_query($query) or die(mysql_error())

This also gets rid of the problem that's already been mentioned where your salt was not the same between fields!

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