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As much as i know, constant class members must be initialized before the constructor runs, but since they cannot be initialized in the class body (as it is just a prototype), therefore we need to initialize it inside initializer list. My question is when does memory gets allocated to a constant variable, and what is the order of execution?

class constant
{
    const int a;
    public:
    constant(int k):a(k)
    {   
        cout<<"a is "<<a<<endl;
    }   
};

int main()
{
    constant cl(5);
    return 0;
} 

EDIT: Is it true that constant variables need to be initialized at the point where they are allocated memory?

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2  
There is no answer that will apply to all C++ implementations, because it is not specified in the Standard. –  Ben Voigt Aug 8 '12 at 17:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you have the wrong idea about const. Think less of it as related to implementation details (like memory), or runtime, and more there as a means to help the programmer and for the compiler.

It doesn't matter when the memory gets allocated (although it's before you construct the object, before entering the initializer list - not specified by the standard), what matters is you can only initialize the variable in the intializer list (pre C++11) or even the class definition for const integral types.

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Technically speaking, you can allocate memory for an object before initializing it (e.g. with placement new). So "when you construct the object" is inaccurate. The constant a in the example gets allocated at the same time as its containing object. –  André Caron Aug 8 '12 at 17:15
    
No, your exact words are "(although it's when you construct the object, before entering the initializer list - not specified by the standard)". –  André Caron Aug 8 '12 at 17:17
    
I see you've edited, but my comment stands. "Before you construct the obejct" is overly vague :-) –  André Caron Aug 8 '12 at 17:17
    
@AndréCaron yeah just spotted that, before is what I meant... –  Luchian Grigore Aug 8 '12 at 17:17
    
@AndréCaron honest mistake :) –  Luchian Grigore Aug 8 '12 at 17:18

when does memory gets allocated to a constant variable

Here, a is a data member of class constant, so it's allocated as part of constant. Whenever you create an instance of constant, there's an a already included.

Note that static members are different, but just because a isn't allowed to change after initialization, doesn't make its storage different from any other regular data member.

... is it necessary that constant variables be initialized at the point where they are allocated memory

Strictly, you have to have the memory available before you can call the constructor, so the phrase at the point where is a bit problematic (see specifically André Caron's comment about placement new).

However, allocation and construction are tied together in most normal use, and initialization of a const member must happen when the object is constructed.

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It could. An object with static storage duration and no non-const members could possibly be stuffed into read-only memory (if the compiler can prove that nothing reads the value before initialization is scheduled). –  Ben Voigt Aug 8 '12 at 17:17
    
hmm, true: all I meant was that it's storage & allocation aren't somehow determined independently of the containing object –  Useless Aug 8 '12 at 17:21

If the variable is const, the compiler enforces you to not change that value after initialization. That is, you must initialize it (must in the sense of RFC2119).

You must directly initialize it:

struct constant {
  const int a;
  constant(int k) : a(k) {
    /* everything is fine here */
  }   
};

You must not leave it uninitialized:

struct constant {
  const int a;
  constant(int k) { 
    /* error: uninitialized member ‘constant::a’ with ‘const’ type ‘const int’ */
  }   
};

And you must not change it's value after construction:

struct constant {
  const int a;
  constant(int k) { 
    a = k; 
    /* error: uninitialized member ‘constant::a’ with ‘const’ type ‘const int’ */
    /* error: assignment of read-only data-member ‘constant::a’ */ 
  }
};
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Exact memory place for object members depends from object creation. If you create object by "new" it is would be a heap. If you create stack object (like on your example) it is would be a stack memory. "Constant" memory - it is memory for "constant", not for "const variables".

Other words, const memory used for literal strings, literal numbers ("text", 5), while a const modifier restrict the memory update.

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