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I'm using some parser and lexer generating tools (similar to Lex and Bison, but for C#) to generate programs that parse strings into abstract syntax trees that can later be evaluated.

I wanted to do error recovery (i.e. report in the produced abstract sentence tree that there are missing tokens and such). I had two approaches in mind to structuring the generated grammars, and I was wondering which approach was better/more flexible/wouldn't have conflicts (the .y and .lex files are generated based on a description of the calculator).

The calculator description allows the user to specify terminals/regex's and their placement for operators and the associativity. So something like:

grammar.AddTerminal("Plus", "\\+").
    AddNonTerminal(new NonTerminal("Add", Associativity.LeftToRight).
        AddTerminal("Expression").
        AddTerminal("Plus").
        AddTerminal("Expression"));

(Precedence is specified via the order that the Terminal's and NonTerminal's are added. "Add" is the name of a method that is discovered via Reflection. Basically it tells the NonTerminal what to call the operator in the abstract syntax tree.)


Approach 1: (allow the empty rule for any expression)

S -> E
E -> E + T
E -> T
T -> T * P
T -> P
P -> (E)
P -> (E [error]
P -> a
P -> @ [error]

a is a terminal. @ is empty.


Approach 2: (only allow the empty rule for the start rule)

S -> E
S -> @ [error]
E -> + [error]
E -> T + [error]
E -> + T [error]
E -> E + T
E -> T
T -> * [error]
T -> * P [error]
T -> P * [error]
T -> T * P
T -> P
P -> (E)
P -> (E [error]
P -> a

Here's an example to show a left-most derivation for a bad-input using each approach.


Input: (a +


Approach 1:

S
E
T
P
(E
(E + T
(T + T
(P + T
(a + T
(a + P
(a +

Approach 2:

S
E
T
P
(E
(T +
(P +
(a +

Approach 2 is much harder to code for (consider subtraction/unary negative operator. You can't just look at subtract A -> A - B, take out that first A and report an error on A -> - B because that's valid for the unary operator.) I coded for approach 2 this morning only to find out that I think it has grammar issues and that an empty rule as in Approach 1 makes things much simpler, code-wise, but my main concern is which approach would produce the least amount of grammar issues as programmers create calculator descriptions as described above.

share|improve this question
    
What does this have to with yacc? yacc has a very specific error recovery scheme based on throwing away tokens to create something parseable. It does not have an easy way of dealing with missing tokens. –  Chris Dodd Aug 8 '12 at 18:34
    
Well the parsing tool I'm using is MPPG, which is a Microsoft branding of GPPG, which is a spin-off of Yacc. Since the syntax is very similar for the .y files, I tagged it as such. –  Words Like Jared Aug 8 '12 at 20:13

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