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my code is

class Alpha
{
public void foo()
    {
    System.out.print("Alpha ");
    }
}

class Beta extends Alpha
{
public void foo()
    {
    System.out.print("Beta ");
    }

public static void main(String[]args)
   {
    Alpha a = new Beta();
    Beta b = (Beta)a;

    a.foo();
    b.foo();
   }
}

Output:-

Beta Beta

i am new to java and this kind of instantiation i have come across for the first time and thats why i am not able to understand why the output is not

Alpha Beta

if 'a' is the object of class Alpha then why not Alpha's method is being called?

Please help me out.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The object that is created is a type Beta, because that's how it was created by new. So, when foo() is called, it's working on a Beta object no matter what you "call" it in your code.

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but then what does the line in which 'b' is instantiated mean? –  Himanshu Aggarwal Aug 8 '12 at 18:49
    
Think of these as references to an object in memory. You have only actually created one real object, which happened with new. When you give Beta b = (Beta)a;, what you get is a new Beta variable pointing at the same thing as a. All Object variables are actually just references, so if you want two distinct objects then you would need to do that explicitly. –  Carl Aug 8 '12 at 18:53
    
so in this case 'b' is actually of no use when 'a' is already present...am i right? –  Himanshu Aggarwal Aug 8 '12 at 18:58
    
I guess you could say that, yes. In this limited context, there's not much that you gain from b. Now, if there were some methods in Beta that were not in Alpha, you would need to create a variable of type Beta in order to use them, because the compiler will consider a an Alpha object, and only allow use of methods that are from the Alpha class, even though the actual definition of them still comes from Beta. –  Carl Aug 8 '12 at 19:07

Casting or referencing an Object as its superclass doesn't un-override methods. The foo() method is still being called on a Beta Object, even if you are originally referencing it as an Alpha Object.

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but then what does the line in which 'b' is instantiated mean? –  Himanshu Aggarwal Aug 8 '12 at 18:44
    
@HimanshuAggarwal b is not instantiated, you are casting a (a Beta object being referenced as an Alpha object) to a Beta object, so that it's being referenced as a Beta object. –  Jon Lin Aug 8 '12 at 18:49

When parent class variable refers child class object, the reference will call child methods.

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You have just one object of type Beta. Casting an object does not make java to use the parent method.

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In java, methods are virtual by default. When deciding what method to actually invoke, the type of the underlying object matters, not the type of the reference to the object.

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