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I am implementing a simple regexp and I am having trouble figuring the behavior of star.

Suppose a*b is my search expression. When it is applied to the target texts aaaaaabbc and 1345536 what should happen?

Because star takes zero or more of preceding character, both must pass. Isn't that correct? The one here http://www.zytrax.com/tech/web/regex.htm says it is not.

If not indeed, then how to make the iteration stop? I feel making it stop breaks the established rule.

-------- edit

The reason I said it must work for the second one is this. There are supposed to be zero or more a and there are zero a. As it goes on, it run out of letters and b wouldn't have a chance to be compared against. So isn't it a match?

That is what I can't get, how and when would b get a chance?

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1  
what language is this in? –  Lone Shepherd Aug 8 '12 at 18:52
    
Also, are you attempting to match the entire regex or are you looking for a submatch? –  Rawrgulmuffins Aug 8 '12 at 18:54
2  
"1345536" doesn't have a "b" in it, so no, that one wouldn't match. –  Wiseguy Aug 8 '12 at 18:54
    
Please check my edited answer. –  Evandro Silva Aug 8 '12 at 20:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Suppose a*b is my search expression. When it is applied to the target texts aaaaaabbc and 1345536 what should happen?

With aaaaaabbc, it starts trying to match at the first character (an a), finds that it can, and keeps going until it reaches the first b. At that point it stops, declaring success. (Some languages add implicit whole-string anchoring to regular expressions by default, but classically can match anywhere.)

With 1345536, it tries to match at the first character, finds that it can't (it's neither a nor b), and so moves on to try from the second one. Since it never finds a point where it can start matching, the whole string doesn't match.

Let's also consider aaac (a case you've not used, but still informative); there though the state machine finds an a and start trying to match, but since it never finds the mandatory b, it never actually completes the match and the string isn't matched.

The reason I said it must work for the second one is this. There are supposed to be zero or more a and there are zero a. As it goes on, it run out of letters and b wouldn't have a chance to be compared against. So isn't it a match?

That is what I can't get, how and when would b get a chance?

In order for a*b to match anything, it has to have a run of zero or more as followed by a mandatory b. Yes, the as are optional but the b is not; it must be present for a match to be found. There's no b in 1345536; it's never going to match. The RE engine will look for an a or a b to start with; either will do. If it finds an a, it will then start trying to match scan over the as until a b is reached (a match) or a non-b (and non-a) is reached (a non-match). If the first character found was a b; the match is immediately found.

In short, you've somewhat misunderstood what a*b means. The optional-ness of the a has nothing to do with the b.

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Aah! It's like this then. if(a){as long as a}else check b. Thanks. –  Dirt Aug 9 '12 at 6:27

In the example you gave, the '1345536' string will not be matched by 'a*b', because it needs a 'b'. These would match:

aaaaaaaaab
aaaaaabc
121435b

The * symbol mean 0 or more of the character before it, therefore, if you put a 'b' anywhere on it, will be matched, the 'a' is just for getting the matching group:

test  | Group
1aab => aab
ab   => ab
bab  => b, ab

EDIT:

The way you're thinking is NOT how regular expressions work, they need to be tested to the end, according to regular-expressions.info: "Only if all possibilities have been tried and found to fail, will the engine continue with the second character.".

When you test a*b on 1345536, this is what happens (not actually this, but you get the idea):

  • Check the first character
  • Is it an 'a' ?
  • Nope
  • Is it a 'b' ?
  • Nope
  • Then go to the next character

'b' got his chance on EACH ONE of the characters in the test string.

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Please check the edit. –  Dirt Aug 8 '12 at 20:05
    
Then what role does the star play? It looks more like one or more. –  Dirt Aug 8 '12 at 20:40
    
If it's a star, it will do as I said, if it's a plus sign, it will search for the 'a' then search for the 'b', because at least one 'a' is required to it continue. The string won't be matched because no 'b' was found, testing with permutations until the end. –  Evandro Silva Aug 8 '12 at 20:51

You didn't say which language, but in most regex implementations, the asterisk represents "zero or more of the preceding character", so a*b would represent "zero or more of 'a' followed by a 'b'".

So, a*b should match the substring aaaaaab in the first target, but won't match at all in the second.

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Please check the edit. –  Dirt Aug 8 '12 at 20:05

A regular expression is isomorphic to a state machine. Once you have the fundamental idea worked out, the code should be obvious. Any basic course in the theory of computation covers this; or read Ken Thompson's original paper.

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1  
This doesn't really answer the question, does it? –  Almo Aug 8 '12 at 19:46
    
"The question to this answer is what the OP should have asked." Maybe it should be a comment, but it's certainly an attempt to get the OP even remotely on track towards actually solving the problem. –  tripleee Aug 9 '12 at 3:31

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