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struct node
{
 int data;
 struct node *next;
};

What is difference between following two functions:

void traverse(struct node *q)
{ }

and

void traverse(struct node **q)
{ }

How can i call above functions from main program?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The first argument list passes a pointer to a struct node. This allows you to change the struct node in the body of the function. For instance:

// this will change the structure, caller will see the changes:
q->data = newValue;

// but this will only change q in the function, caller WON'T see the NULL:
q = NULL;

The second argument list passes a pointer to a pointer to a struct node. This allows you to not only change the struct node in the body of the function, but also to change what the pointer points to. For instance:

// this will change the structure, caller will see the changes:
(*q)->data = newValue;

// This will change the pointer, caller will now see a NULL:
*q = NULL:

As for calling the two versions of the function, from main or otherwise: given a pointer to your structure: struct node *arg;,

  • you could call the first version like this: traverse(arg);
  • and the second version like this: traverse(&arg);

Alternately, given a structure declared as struct node arg;, you can make a pointer to it:

struct node arg;
struct node *ptrToArg = &arg;

And then:

  • you could call the first version like this: traverse(&arg);
  • and the second version like this: traverse(&ptrToArg);
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void traverse(struct node *q)
{ }

Takes a pointer to a struct. You would could call it like this:

struct node A;
traverse(&A);

This function

void traverse(struct node **q)
{ }

Takes a pointer to a pointer to a struct. You could call it like this:

struct node A;
struct node* Aptr = &A;
traverse(&Aptr);

Passing a pointers is useful if you want to modify the original variable that you pass to the function, for example, if you had a function like this:

void setToNull(struct node ** q){
   *q = NULL;
}

Then you could do this:

struct node A;
struct node* Aptr = &A;
setToNull(&Aptr);
// Aptr is now equal to NULL.
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 void traverse(struct node *q)

Simply passes a pointer to the function.

 void traverse(struct node **q)

Passes a pointer to a pointer, so you can change the original one. It's the C-equivalent of C++'s passing a pointer by reference. In C++, you can just do:

 void traverse(node *& q)

You'd call them as:

 struct node* q;

 //...
 traverse(q); //calls first version
 traverse(&q);//calls second version
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