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So lets say I have the following code

Header:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

FOUNDATION_EXPORT NSString* const kTHBaseUrl;

@interface THSharedObject : NSObject

+ (THSharedObject*)shared;
- (NSString*)baseUrl;

@end

Implementation:

#import "THSharedObject.h"

NSString* const kTHBaseURL = @"http://0.0.0.0/";

@implementation THSharedObject

static THSharedObject* shared;

+ (void)initialize
{
    static BOOL initialized = NO;
    if(!initialized) {
        initialized = YES;
        shared = [[THSharedObject alloc] init];
    }
}

+ (THSharedObject*)shared
{
    return shared;
}

- (NSString*)baseUrl
{
    return kTHBaseURL;
}

- (MyModelObject*)globalModel
{
    return instanceOfModel;
}

@end

Should I include this file in the .pch, or should I include it in only the files that use the shared object.

Would it be more appropriate to call the kTHBaseURL constant, or call an instanced method that returns the constant [[THSharedObject shared] baseUrl];

What are the advantages and disadvantages of including a file in a pch as opposed to including it in only classes that use it.

What are the advantages of calling a method that returns a constant as opposed to calling the constant directly.

Or is all of this just a matter of opinion?

Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

You cannot access a constant in the implementation from outside the class unless the constant is in the header file which in this case its not. Its ok to use the constant directly inside the class, but external classes need a static method (if its a static) or an instance method to return the value.

share|improve this answer
    
My header contains FOUNDATION_EXPORT NSString* const kTHBaseUrl; I edit my question to represent that, I thought it was assumed. –  Jesse Earle Aug 8 '12 at 19:53
    
Your constant is at file scope in that case, in general file scope should be avoided unless you are defining an API or a framework that needs to expose a bunch of them for general use. For application constants it seems like a poor choice to me, but maybe that is just an opinion. File scope is generally evil as namespace collisions can occur and there's is no obvious class context for where the constant came from unless you embed alot of information into the constant name for example NSCenterTextAlignment - that kind of thing. What class uses or exposes that constant? its a guess –  deleted_user Aug 8 '12 at 20:22

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