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I'm experiencing a memory leak due to orphaned threads in Tomcat. Particularly, it seems that Guice and the JDBC driver are not closing threads.

Aug 8, 2012 4:09:19 PM org.apache.catalina.loader.WebappClassLoader clearReferencesThreads
SEVERE: A web application appears to have started a thread named [com.google.inject.internal.util.$Finalizer] but has failed to stop it. This is very likely to create a memory leak.
Aug 8, 2012 4:09:19 PM org.apache.catalina.loader.WebappClassLoader clearReferencesThreads
SEVERE: A web application appears to have started a thread named [Abandoned connection cleanup thread] but has failed to stop it. This is very likely to create a memory leak.

I know this is similar to other questions (such as this one), but in my case, the answer of "don't worry about it" won't be sufficient, as it is causing problems for me. I have CI server which regularly updates this application, and after 6-10 reloads, the CI server will hang because Tomcat is out of memory.

I need to be able to clear up these orphaned threads so I can run my CI server more reliably. Any help would be appreciated!

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Sure these are the cause of OOM error? The JDBC issue solves by killing the thread using a context listener on context destroy event AND putting the driver in app's lib so the classloading is done in app's context, not in container's. –  Alfabravo Aug 8 '12 at 20:09
    
Thanks. I'm pretty new to this space, so I'm not at all sure this is the cause of the OOM error, but it's the only suspicious note I'm getting in Tomcat's log when I redeploy this web app. Any tips on finding the source or properly using the contextListener as you recommend? I didn't spot any obviously relevant tutorials after a quick Google, but I'd be happy to read up on the issue if you could point me in the right direction. –  Jeff Allen Aug 10 '12 at 0:31
1  
To unload drivers using a contextlistener, look at the answers here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3320400/… –  Alfabravo Aug 10 '12 at 13:54
    
I'm having the same issue. Tomcat shows the thread "Abandoned connection cleanup thread" for as many times as the webapp was restarted and de-registering the drivers is not helping me at all... any good news? –  Oso Sep 15 '12 at 19:17
    
Maybe it's me not very smart, but I don't see an answer related also to the guava problem (most of answers focus on mysql conn pool), that affects me (before adding that thing the app was cleaning up well on reload/stop): I end up setting a higher limit for the perm gen space, so I can wait more time among tomcat restarts because of this. Pretty sad to see a Google library sith a memory leak... –  reallynic Dec 3 '14 at 18:20

7 Answers 7

up vote 32 down vote accepted

I just dealt with this problem myself. Contrary to some other answers, I do not recommend issuing the t.stop() command. This method has been deprecated, and for good reason. Reference Oracle's reasons for doing this.

However there is a solution for removing this error without needing to resort to t.stop()...

You can use most of the code @Oso provided, just replace the following section

Set<Thread> threadSet = Thread.getAllStackTraces().keySet();
Thread[] threadArray = threadSet.toArray(new Thread[threadSet.size()]);
for(Thread t:threadArray) {
    if(t.getName().contains("Abandoned connection cleanup thread")) {
        synchronized(t) {
            t.stop(); //don't complain, it works
        }
    }
}

Replace it using the following method provided by the MySQL driver:

try {
    AbandonedConnectionCleanupThread.shutdown();
} catch (InterruptedException e) {
    logger.warn("SEVERE problem cleaning up: " + e.getMessage());
    e.printStackTrace();
}

This should properly shutdown the thread, and the error should go away.

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3  
Where does AbandonedConnectionCleanupThread come from? –  Sotirios Delimanolis Jul 22 '13 at 15:54
1  
This was initially a pain to find. No javadocs, little reference. I discovered it looking through bug reports on tomcat. Here is an indirect reference from oracle itself. docs.oracle.com/cd/E17952_01/connector-j-relnotes-en/… –  Bill Jul 22 '13 at 16:14
    
Ah awesome, I was on 5.1.22. The class was introduced in 5.1.23. +1 Thanks –  Sotirios Delimanolis Jul 22 '13 at 16:18
    
(sorry comments do not format this well...) The link you had on "Oracle's reasons" should be updated to: docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/technotes/guides/concurrency/… I would add a suggestion on where to place this. Using spring I have this in my web.xml <listener> <listener-class>com.mypackage.web.context.MyContextLoaderListener</listener-clas‌​s> </listener> That class extends org.springframework.web.context.ContextLoaderListener and on contextDestroyed() I do that. –  Daniele Segato Dec 5 '13 at 9:56

I've had the same issue, and as Jeff says, the "don't worry about it approach" was not the way to go.

I did a ServletContextListener that stops the hung thread when the context is being closed, and then registered such ContextListener on the web.xml file.

I already know that stopping a thread is not an elegant way to deal with them, but otherwise the server keeps on crashing after two or three deploys (it is not always possible to restart the app server).

The class I created is:

public class ContextFinalizer implements ServletContextListener {

    private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(ContextFinalizer.class);

    public void contextInitialized(ServletContextEvent sce) {
    }

    public void contextDestroyed(ServletContextEvent sce) {
        Enumeration<Driver> drivers = DriverManager.getDrivers();
        Driver d = null;
        while(drivers.hasMoreElements()) {
            try {
                d = drivers.nextElement();
                DriverManager.deregisterDriver(d);
                LOGGER.warn(String.format("Driver %s deregistered", d));
            } catch (SQLException ex) {
                LOGGER.warn(String.format("Error deregistering driver %s", d), ex);
            }
        }
        Set<Thread> threadSet = Thread.getAllStackTraces().keySet();
        Thread[] threadArray = threadSet.toArray(new Thread[threadSet.size()]);
        for(Thread t:threadArray) {
            if(t.getName().contains("Abandoned connection cleanup thread")) {
                synchronized(t) {
                    t.stop(); //don't complain, it works
                }
            }
        }
    }

}

After creating the class, then register it on the web.xml file:

<web-app...
    <listener>
        <listener-class>path.to.ContextFinalizer</listener-class>
    </listener>
</web-app>
share|improve this answer

The least invasive workaround is to force initialisation of the MySQL JDBC driver from code outside of the webapp's classloader.

In tomcat/conf/server.xml, modify (inside the Server element):

<Listener className="org.apache.catalina.core.JreMemoryLeakPreventionListener" />

to

<Listener className="org.apache.catalina.core.JreMemoryLeakPreventionListener"
          classesToInitialize="com.mysql.jdbc.NonRegisteringDriver" />

This assumes you put the MySQL JDBC driver into tomcat's lib directory and not inside your webapp.war's WEB-INF/lib directory, as the whole point is to load the driver before and independently of your webapp.

References:

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately this did not work for me. I am using TomEE 1.6.0 (Tomcat 7.0.47) and MySQL driver 5.1.27. Finally I have choosed the solution based on the AbandonedConnectionCleanupThread class. The Thread killing is also worked for me but I prefer the solution which is directly connected to the source of the problem which is the MySQL JDBC driver itself. –  Miklos Krivan Jan 25 '14 at 19:32
    
@MiklosKrivan you did put your JDBC driver .jar file in tomcat's lib directory and not inside your .war's WEB-INF/lib, right? I believe the first approach is required for the JreMemoryLeakPreventionListener to work, and assume the latter approach is required to ever re-start the AbandonedConnectionCleanupThread thread after being shut down once (it's started from a static initializer in the JDBC driver itself). –  Stefan L Jan 29 '14 at 9:01
    
Yes I always put the JDBC driver into the Tomcat's lib because I use datasources and I prefer if the container manages the database pool and not the application. This is required in enterprise java app servers as well what I am using usally. Your suggestion was related to the situation where JDBC driver is in the Tomcat's lib. That is why I have written my comment. Maybe I have misunderstood something? –  Miklos Krivan Jan 30 '14 at 6:12
    
@MiklosKrivan won't putting the JDBC driver in Tomcat's lib directory and then calling AbandonedConnectionCleanupThread.shutdown() cause that thread to stop running forever until tomcat is restarted, stopping the cleanup of connections it would otherwise do in the background for other or redeployed webapps? If your webapps are well-behaving and always close their connections properly that might not matter though of course, haven't looked into the details of what AbandonedConnectionCleanupThread actually does. –  Stefan L Jan 30 '14 at 8:57

Effective from MySQL connector 5.1.23 onwards, a method is provided to shut the abandoned connection cleanup thread down, AbandonedConnectionCleanupThread.shutdown.

However, we don't want direct dependencies in our code on the otherwise opaque JDBC driver code, so my solution is to use reflection to find the class and method and invoke it if found. The following complete code snippet is all that's needed, executed in the context of the class loader that loaded the JDBC driver:

try {
    Class<?> cls=Class.forName("com.mysql.jdbc.AbandonedConnectionCleanupThread");
    Method   mth=(cls==null ? null : cls.getMethod("shutdown"));
    if(mth!=null) {
        log.println("MySQL connection cleanup thread shutdown");
        mth.invoke(null);
        log.println("MySQL connection cleanup thread shutdown successful");
        }
    }
catch (Throwable thr) {
    log.println("[ER] Failed to shutdown SQL connection cleanup thread: " + thr.getMessage());
    thr.printStackTrace();
    }

This cleanly ends the thread if the JDBC driver is a sufficiently recent version of the MySQL connector and otherwise does nothing.

Note it has to be executed in the context of the class loader because the thread is a static reference; if the driver class is not being or has not already been unloaded when this code is run then the thread will not be running for subsequent JDBC interactions.

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2  
I find this to be the best answer of all for two reasons 1) It doesn't use Thread.stop() and 2) It doesn't require an explicit app dependency on the MySQL connector. –  Jason Nichols Aug 5 '13 at 14:23

I went a step further from Oso,improved the code above in two points:

  1. Added the Finalizer thread to the need-to-kill check:

    for(Thread t:threadArray) {
            if(t.getName().contains("Abandoned connection cleanup thread") 
                ||  t.getName().matches("com\\.google.*Finalizer")
                ) {
            synchronized(t) {
                logger.warn("Forcibly stopping thread to avoid memory leak: " + t.getName());
                t.stop(); //don't complain, it works
            }
        }
    }
    
  2. Sleep for a little while to give threads time to stop. Without that, tomcat kept complaining.

    try {
        Thread.sleep(1000);
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        logger.debug(e.getMessage(), e);
    }
    
share|improve this answer

I took the best parts of the answers above and combined them into an easily extensible class. This combines Oso's original suggestion with Bill's driver improvement and Software Monkey's reflection improvement. (I liked the simplicity of Stephan L's answer too, but sometimes modifying the Tomcat environment itself is not a good option, especially if you have to deal with autoscaling or migration to another web container.)

Instead of directly referring to the class name, thread name, and stop method, I also encapsulated these into an private inner ThreadInfo class. Using a list of these ThreadInfo objects, you can include additional troublesome threads to be shutdown with the same code. This is a bit more complex of a solution than most people likely need, but should work more generally when you need that.

import java.lang.reflect.Method;
import java.sql.Driver;
import java.sql.DriverManager;
import java.sql.SQLException;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Enumeration;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Set;

import javax.servlet.ServletContextEvent;
import javax.servlet.ServletContextListener;

import org.slf4j.Logger;
import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory;


/**
 * Context finalization to close threads (MySQL memory leak prevention).
 * This solution combines the best techniques described in the linked Stack
 * Overflow answer.
 * @see <a href="https://stackoverflow.com/questions/11872316/tomcat-guice-jdbc-memory-leak">Tomcat Guice/JDBC Memory Leak</a>
 */
public class ContextFinalizer
    implements ServletContextListener {

    private static final Logger LOGGER =
        LoggerFactory.getLogger(ContextFinalizer.class);

    /**
     * Information for cleaning up a thread.
     */
    private class ThreadInfo {

        /**
         * Name of the thread's initiating class.
         */
        private final String name;

        /**
         * Cue identifying the thread.
         */
        private final String cue;

        /**
         * Name of the method to stop the thread.
         */
        private final String stop;

        /**
         * Basic constructor.
         * @param n Name of the thread's initiating class.
         * @param c Cue identifying the thread.
         * @param s Name of the method to stop the thread.
         */
        ThreadInfo(final String n, final String c, final String s) {
            this.name = n;
            this.cue  = c;
            this.stop = s;
        }

        /**
         * @return the name
         */
        public String getName() {
            return this.name;
        }

        /**
         * @return the cue
         */
        public String getCue() {
            return this.cue;
        }

        /**
         * @return the stop
         */
        public String getStop() {
            return this.stop;
        }
    }

    /**
     * List of information on threads required to stop.  This list may be
     * expanded as necessary.
     */
    private List<ThreadInfo> threads = Arrays.asList(
        // Special cleanup for MySQL JDBC Connector.
        new ThreadInfo(
            "com.mysql.jdbc.AbandonedConnectionCleanupThread", //$NON-NLS-1$
            "Abandoned connection cleanup thread", //$NON-NLS-1$
            "shutdown" //$NON-NLS-1$
        )
    );

    @Override
    public void contextInitialized(final ServletContextEvent sce) {
        // No-op.
    }

    @Override
    public final void contextDestroyed(final ServletContextEvent sce) {

        // Deregister all drivers.
        Enumeration<Driver> drivers = DriverManager.getDrivers();
        while (drivers.hasMoreElements()) {
            Driver d = drivers.nextElement();
            try {
                DriverManager.deregisterDriver(d);
                LOGGER.info(
                    String.format(
                        "Driver %s deregistered", //$NON-NLS-1$
                        d
                    )
                );
            } catch (SQLException e) {
                LOGGER.warn(
                    String.format(
                        "Failed to deregister driver %s", //$NON-NLS-1$
                        d
                    ),
                    e
                );
            }
        }

        // Handle remaining threads.
        Set<Thread> threadSet = Thread.getAllStackTraces().keySet();
        Thread[] threadArray = threadSet.toArray(new Thread[threadSet.size()]);
        for (Thread t:threadArray) {
            for (ThreadInfo i:this.threads) {
                if (t.getName().contains(i.getCue())) {
                    synchronized (t) {
                        try {
                            Class<?> cls = Class.forName(i.getName());
                            if (cls != null) {
                                Method mth = cls.getMethod(i.getStop());
                                if (mth != null) {
                                    mth.invoke(null);
                                    LOGGER.info(
                                        String.format(
            "Connection cleanup thread %s shutdown successfully.", //$NON-NLS-1$
                                            i.getName()
                                        )
                                    );
                                }
                            }
                        } catch (Throwable thr) {
                            LOGGER.warn(
                                    String.format(
            "Failed to shutdown connection cleanup thread %s: ", //$NON-NLS-1$
                                        i.getName(),
                                        thr.getMessage()
                                    )
                                );
                            thr.printStackTrace();
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

}
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Working very well, thanks :) –  don-kaotic May 7 at 15:15

Bill's solution looks good, however I found another solution directly in MySQL bug reports:

[5 Jun 2013 17:12] Christopher Schultz Here is a much better workaround until something else changes.

Enable Tomcat's JreMemoryLeakPreventionListener (enabled by default on Tomcat 7), and add this attribute to the element:

classesToInitialize="com.mysql.jdbc.NonRegisteringDriver"

If "classesToInitialize" is already set on your , just add NonRegisteringDriver to the existing value separated by a comma.

and the answer:

[8 Jun 2013 21:33] Marko Asplund I did some testing with the JreMemoryLeakPreventionListener / classesToInitialize workaround (Tomcat 7.0.39 + MySQL Connector/J 5.1.25).

Before applying the workaround thread dumps listed multiple AbandonedConnectionCleanupThread instances after redeploying the webapp several times. After applying the workaround there's only one AbandonedConnectionCleanupThread instance.

I had to modify my app, though, and move MySQL driver from the webapp to Tomcat lib. Otherwise, the classloader is unable to load com.mysql.jdbc.NonRegisteringDriver at Tomcat startup.

I hope it helps for all who still fighting with this issue...

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