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I'm frequently using this structure:

var example = (function () {
    function privateFn2 () {
       ...
    }
    function privateFn1 () {
       ...
    }
    return {
        publicMethod1: function () {...
        },
        publicMethod2: function () {...
        }
    };
}());

What I want to know is this: If privateFn1 is the only function/method that calls privateFn2, is it regarded as better practice to set it up as follows?

EDITED for clarity

var example = (function () {
    function privateFn1() {
        function privateFn2() {
        }
        ...
        privateFn2();
    }
    return {
        publicMethod1: function () {...
        },
        publicMethod2: function () {...
        }
    };
}());

This is a wildly simplified example, of course. The issue is that I have lots of private functions, and I'm wondering whether nesting is well- or poorly-regarded. I recognise it is quite possibly a matter of preference, but any advice will be gratefully received.

Thanks.

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I see what you are saying, but you aren't returning the same thing. –  Tyler Crompton Aug 8 '12 at 21:39
    
I've edited what I mean to make it clearer. I'm pretty sure it's the same thing :) –  Nick Aug 8 '12 at 21:47
    
Out of curiosity, why do you mix function declaration styles? –  Tyler Crompton Aug 8 '12 at 21:50
    
Also, IMO, there is no point in nesting the private functions like that. Just keep them separated. I know you don't see any use for privateFn2 in another function but it works the same if you keep it out of privateFn1. It also avoids redeclaring privateFn2. Also, either put the contents of privateFn2 inside privateFn1 instead or put privateFn2 in the same scope as privateFn1. –  Tyler Crompton Aug 8 '12 at 21:55
    
Thanks, @TylerCrompton . In answer to your question, I guess I mix function declaration styles because (1) there's usually no benefit in having private methods rather than functions in my case because I don't make use of this and so it's neater to call the function (and gets minimised smaller), and (2) the var example = (...()); ends up being an object with methods - as I guess you realise ;) –  Nick Aug 9 '12 at 12:13
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It depends on the situation. If you have several private functions that are only relavent to yet another private function, then perhaps this is a situation where the object or class is packaging more functionality then it should be.

Here are some questions to ask:

  • Do these private functions have side effects? That is, are they manipulating any closed over properties? If not, is this some generalized logic that could be implemented statically and included separately? Or, are these private functions manipulating a subset of properties that could be moved to another class or object?
  • Are the private functions simple task specific helper functions to be used within a larger algorithm or control function; such as a filter function for sorting an array, or some other kind of iteration callback? If so, then it may be in-fact cleaner to nest those functions inside and keep them out of scope of the main object. Will any other code need these functions?
  • How many times will the main private function be called? If it will be called very frequently (inside a loop or on a timer interval) then nesting the private functions inside could incur a measurable overhead -- which would have otherwise been negligible had the private function been called only occasionally.

There are always trade-offs to consider, thinking about these questions will help you decide what is best for your particular situation.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks :) They are usually "task specific helper functions", BTW. –  Nick Aug 9 '12 at 3:52
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I would avoid your second example. Every time privateFn1 gets called, it redefines privateFn2. Why not just do it once? You might even need to use it somewhere else later on.

However, if you really want to hide privateFn2, a better solution is this:

var privateFn1 = (function () {
    function privateFn2() {
        // ...
    }

    return function () {
        privateFn2();
        // ...
    };
})();
share|improve this answer
    
I omitted the outside structure in the second section of code, but I've edited it for clarity. It is already hidden by the var example pattern :) –  Nick Aug 8 '12 at 21:48
    
Thanks for your help. –  Nick Aug 9 '12 at 3:52
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