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I have a templated math function which takes two values, does some math to them, and returns a value of the same type.

template <typename T>
T math_function(T a, T b) {
  LongT x = MATH_OP1(a,b);
  return MATH_OP2(x,a);
}

I want to store intermediate values (in x) in a type which is basically the long version of T (above, called LongT). So, if T is float, I want x to be a double; and if T is an int, I want x to be a long int.

Is there some way to accomplish this? I tried enable_if, but it seems that I would really need an enable_if_else.

I'd prefer to have the compiler figure out what to use for LongT on its own. I'd rather not have to specify it when I call the function.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can define a type mapping that will yield the needed type:

template <typename T> struct long_type;
template <> struct long_type<int> {
   typedef long type;
};
template <> struct long_type<float> {
   typedef double type;
};

And then use that metafunction:

template <typename T>
T math_function(T a, T b) {
  typename long_type<T>::type x = MATH_OP1(a,b);
  return static_cast<T>(MATH_OP2(x,a));
}

With this particular implementation, your template will fail to compile for any type other than the ones for which you have provided the long_type trait. You might want to provide a generic version that will just map to the itself, so that if the input is long long int that is what is used (assuming no larger type in your architecture).

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Out of curiosity, what would the default look like? –  mohawkjohn Aug 9 '12 at 16:38
2  
@mohawkjohn: The base template would be defined (in the answer it is only declared) as template <typename T> struct long_type { typedef T type; };, that is, for any type for which we know no larger type, use that type internally –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 9 '12 at 17:39

Assuming you don't need to handle T=long for example, just create traits for int and float:

template <typename T>
struct LongT;

template <>
struct LongT<int>
{
    typedef long value_type;
};

template <>
struct LongT<float>
{
    typedef double value_type;
};

template <typename T>
T math_function(T a, T b) {
  typename LongT<T>::value_type x = MATH_OP1(a,b);
  return MATH_OP2(x,a);
}
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In C++11 you can use auto keyword to retrieve type of the MATH_OP. It is safe and handled by compiler.

auto x = MATH_OP1(a,b);
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I don't think auto is the solution. My understanding is that he wants to promote the types to a larger type, perform the operations there (avoiding overflows) and then push the solution back to the original type. For example: average( MAX_INT, MAX_INT) could be implemented as int average( int a, int b ) { long long _a = a, _b = b; return static_cast<int>( (_a+_b)/2 ); }. In this case, auto would not resolve to long long but rather to int with the intermediate value potentially overflowing. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 9 '12 at 17:44
template<typename T> struct LongT  {typedef T type;}

template<> struct LongT<int8_t>    {typedef int16_t type;}
template<> struct LongT<int16_t>   {typedef int32_t type;}
template<> struct LongT<int32_t>   {typedef int64_t type;}
template<> struct LongT<int64_t>   {typedef intmax_t type;}
// same for unsigned ...

template<> struct LongT<float>     {typedef double type;}
// template<> struct LongT<double> {typedef long double type;}

Used like so:

typename LongT<T>::type  x;
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Many thanks. I'm actually using your code almost verbatim in NMatrix (Ruby matrix library), but I have to give the check-mark to one of the people who answered first. –  mohawkjohn Aug 9 '12 at 16:39

You can write your own specialisations of your own structure, or use something like

#include <type_traits>

template<typename T>
void func(const T& f, const T& s)
{
   typename std::conditional
   <
      std::is_same<T, float>::value,
      double,
      typename std::conditional
      <
        std::is_same<T, int>::value,
        long,
        void
      >::type
   >::type X(f + s);
   (void)X;
}

int main()
{
   func(1, 1);
   func(1.0f, 1.0f);
   func(1.0, 1.0);
}

http://liveworkspace.org/code/8f75236b880a3fe210a8751e485a47ed

But write your own specializations as suggest David or Mark is pretty clever.

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