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I need some help with the map function in Perl, it seems to croupte my arrays.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use Math::Trig;

my @Degre = map {rand(360)} (1..2000);
my @step= map {rand(.5)} (1..2000);
my @aa = map {rand(2000)} (1..2000);
my @bb = map {rand(2000)} (1..2000);

for ($i = 0; $i <=100; $i++)

{
my @xx = map {$aa[$_]*(cos($Degre[$_])*(pi/180))}(1..2000);
my @yy = map {$bb[$_]*(cos($Degre[$_])*(pi/180))}(1..2000);

@Degre = map {@Degre[$_] + @step[$_]} (1..2000);


print "@bb[1]  @aa[1]  @Degre[1] @step[1] \n";
}

Now the out put of this gives

1146.56471948439  1909.33326800968  329.443529905881 0.117635819122725
1146.56471948439  1909.33326800968  343.482356802257 0.117635819122725
1146.56471948439  1909.33326800968  164.500200570578 0.117635819122725
1146.56471948439  1909.33326800968  252.734665366625 0.117635819122725
1146.56471948439  1909.33326800968  274.983382178209 0.117635819122725
1146.56471948439  1909.33326800968  324.609187610893 0.117635819122725
1146.56471948439  1909.33326800968  261.96207333817 0.117635819122725
1146.56471948439  1909.33326800968  279.442105351764 0.117635819122725

With the 3rd column being the degrees, I don't see why it seems to jump around randomly when I expected it to increase in 0.117635..... steps?

Cheers

UPDATE

To confirm I am trying to get the map statment to do the following

for ($x = 0; $x <=2000; $x++)
{

$degre[$x] = $degre[$x] + $step[$i]
}

altering the code to

for ($i = 0; $i <=100; $i++)

{
my @xx = map {$aa[$_]*(cos($Degre[$_])*(pi/180))}(1..2000);
my @yy = map {$bb[$_]*(cos($Degre[$_])*(pi/180))}(1..2000);

#@Degre = map {$Degre[$_] + $step[$_]} (1..2000);
for ($x = 0; $x <=2000; $x++)

{
$Degre[$x] = $Degre[$x] + $step[$x];
}

gives the following out put

738.346205775827  646.171091419262  395.07480695473 0.484472140779317
738.346205775827  646.171091419262  395.559279095509 0.484472140779317
738.346205775827  646.171091419262  396.043751236288 0.484472140779317
738.346205775827  646.171091419262  396.528223377068 0.484472140779317
738.346205775827  646.171091419262  397.012695517847 0.484472140779317
738.346205775827  646.171091419262  397.497167658626 0.484472140779317
738.346205775827  646.171091419262  397.981639799406 0.484472140779317
738.346205775827  646.171091419262  398.466111940185 0.484472140779317

as you can see the degree column now incremented correctly by the step value each time thought the loop. So why does map not do the same.

share|improve this question
    
one question does the line "@Degre = map {$Degre[$_] + $step[$_]} (1..2000);" over right the original array values? or add to the array? –  DevilWAH Aug 8 '12 at 23:02
    
Incidentally, map {} (1..2000) is an inefficient way of doing things, because it creates a 2000-element array populated with the numbers 1 to 2000. A for loop that does the same thing would be more efficient: $Degre[$_] += $step[$_] for (1..2000) –  dan1111 Aug 9 '12 at 14:06
    
When i tested a for loop (using the code in my question above). and bench marked it against using "map" it was signifently slower. I will try again with the code you suggest. Cheers :) –  DevilWAH Aug 10 '12 at 20:33
    
well interesting using the map function i get 574 cycles per second, the loop code you gave above 676, so nearly 20% improvement. Thank you for the tip sir. –  DevilWAH Aug 11 '12 at 19:58
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your @Degre gets changed inside the loop every time where as aa bb and step remains unchanged.

  print "$aa[1]  $bb[1]  $Degre[1] $step[1] \n";

The above shows correct value as calculated in

 @Degre = map {$Degre[$_] + $step[$_]} (1..2000);

Print @xx and @yy in your print statement instead of @aa and @bb and see the values change as per calculation.

Put a @Degre=sort(@Degre); just before the for loop and see the results. Below are the results after sorting-

1726.50146484375  681.5185546875  0.624771118164063 0.456436157226563 
1726.50146484375  681.5185546875  1.15629577636719 0.456436157226563 
1726.50146484375  681.5185546875  1.7493896484375 0.456436157226563 
1726.50146484375  681.5185546875  2.49296569824219 0.456436157226563 
1726.50146484375  681.5185546875  2.861083984375 0.456436157226563 
1726.50146484375  681.5185546875  3.20767211914063 0.456436157226563 
1726.50146484375  681.5185546875  3.44265747070313 0.456436157226563 
1726.50146484375  681.5185546875  11.8232574462891 0.456436157226563 
1726.50146484375  681.5185546875  12.2711944580078 0.456436157226563 
1726.50146484375  681.5185546875  12.3104858398438 0.456436157226563 
1726.50146484375  681.5185546875  13.2642059326172 0.456436157226563 
1726.50146484375  681.5185546875  13.4784698486328 0.456436157226563 
1726.50146484375  681.5185546875  103.224014282227 0.456436157226563 
1726.50146484375  681.5185546875  103.868133544922 0.456436157226563 
1726.50146484375  681.5185546875  104.103759765625 0.456436157226563 
1726.50146484375  681.5185546875  104.71240234375 0.456436157226563 

As you can see, the calculation is correct i.e. in the first row 0.624771118164063 + 0.456436157226563 is 1.15629577636719 data in the second row and so on.

However, there is a jump from 3.44265747070313 to 11.8232574462891 at some point. I am not sure why that may be happening happening, but my assumption is that the indexing goes wrong at a certain point. This is resolved using code below

@Degre = map {$Degre[$_] + $step[$_]} (0..@step-1);

This time the output is much more consistent in the third column-

1139.18230471501  192.716943394942  183.715442551381 0.45937396317494 
1139.18230471501  192.716943394942  184.174816514556 0.45937396317494 
1139.18230471501  192.716943394942  184.634190477731 0.45937396317494 
1139.18230471501  192.716943394942  185.093564440906 0.45937396317494 
1139.18230471501  192.716943394942  185.552938404081 0.45937396317494 
1139.18230471501  192.716943394942  186.012312367256 0.45937396317494 
1139.18230471501  192.716943394942  186.471686330431 0.45937396317494 
1139.18230471501  192.716943394942  186.931060293605 0.45937396317494 
1139.18230471501  192.716943394942  187.39043425678 0.45937396317494 
1139.18230471501  192.716943394942  187.849808219955 0.45937396317494 
1139.18230471501  192.716943394942  188.30918218313 0.45937396317494 
share|improve this answer
    
Oh and I was printing aa bb and step just for testing. I wanted to see that they remained constant. –  DevilWAH Aug 8 '12 at 22:52
    
Why would i need to sort? if $degre[1] = 10 and $step[1] = 5 then I would expect each for loop to incress $degre[1] by 5. So I don't see why sort function is needed..... –  DevilWAH Aug 8 '12 at 23:00
    
I said sort just to see the incremental increas of degre. No other purpose. –  Annjawn Aug 8 '12 at 23:46
    
but why are they not already in order? i was expecting the map statement to be the equilivent of a for loop. the value in each element of array \@Degre would be incremented by the equlivent step value in the array \@step. see my update in the original question –  DevilWAH Aug 9 '12 at 0:18
    
No, they are not in order. You use random to populate the array using map. RANDOM will no necessarily fetch you values in sorted order. Map does what you think (the work of the for loop, per se), but will not sort the data unless you sort it. An the errors in your code, i think you used use strict; so in that case you need to declare all variables used before using it using my. –  Annjawn Aug 9 '12 at 0:30
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After adding

use strict;
use warnings;

I got pretty different output:

Scalar value @Degre[$_] better written as $Degre[$_] at test3 line 20.
Scalar value @step[$_] better written as $step[$_] at test3 line 20.
Scalar value @bb[1] better written as $bb[1] at test3 line 23.
Scalar value @aa[1] better written as $aa[1] at test3 line 23.
Scalar value @Degre[1] better written as $Degre[1] at test3 line 23.
Scalar value @step[1] better written as $step[1] at test3 line 23.
Global symbol "$i" requires explicit package name at test3 line 14.
Global symbol "$i" requires explicit package name at test3 line 14.
Global symbol "$i" requires explicit package name at test3 line 14.
Execution of test3 aborted due to compilation errors.
share|improve this answer
    
cheers, I really must get in habit of using that! realy is no excuse not to use it. –  DevilWAH Aug 8 '12 at 22:55
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I think you've got @ where you mean $.

@Degre = map {@Degre[$_] + @step[$_]} (1..2000);

If you are trying to access elements of @Degre and @step then you want $Degre[$_] etc.

I'm not clear what @xx/yy are for either - they don't appear to be used

share|improve this answer
    
the xx and yy are point on an eclipse. aa and bb are the height and withe of the eclipse. So currently they ddo nothing but what this code snipit is doing is generating 2000 eclipse's. and using the value of the degree's calculating the X,y coordinates. each cycle incressing the degree by a set amount and recalculating the points. –  DevilWAH Aug 8 '12 at 22:25
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