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So, while being schooled by James Kanze and Loki Astari about C linkage, I was wondering about this:

extern "C" int foo1 (void (*)());
extern "C" { int foo2 (void (*)()); }

After my schooling, I think it must be that foo1 only takes a function pointer with C++ linkage, while foo2 only takes a function pointer with C linkage. Is my understanding correct? Are there specific references in the C++ standard that explain the differences in my example above?

Edit: To make it easier for everyone to follow along here's a pastebin with the relevant part from the C++ 11 draft standard.

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4  
+1 for "schooled" :)) – Luchian Grigore Aug 8 '12 at 22:11
up vote 6 down vote accepted

foo1 takes a pointer to a C function as shown in [dcl.link] 7.5p4

In a linkage-specification, the specified language linkage applies to the function types of all function declarators, function names with external linkage, and variable names with external linkage declared within the linkage-specification. [Example:

extern "C" void f1(void(*pf)(int));
                                                                 // the name f1 and its function type have C language
                                                                 // linkage; pf is a pointer to a C function

The example applies directly to foo1 and the added emphasis highlights what I think is the reason. The function's parameter lists contains a function declarator for a parameter, and all function declarators are affected by the linkage specification. This applies to both braced and non-braced linkage specifications.

Some differences when not using braces are that names are automatically extern and explicit use of a storage specifier is prohibited.

extern "C" int i; // not a definition

int main() {
    i = 1; // error, no definition
}

extern "C" static void g(); // error
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I guess it kind of makes sense that it is impossible to define a function with C linkage to take a callback function with C++ linkage, but I can't see anything in the wording that actually states that. Did you? – jxh Aug 8 '12 at 23:10
    
It's entirely possible to have a function with C linkage take a pointer to a function with C++ linkage: extern "C++" typedef void (*CPPFUNC)(); extern "C" void foo(CPPFUNC); – bames53 Aug 8 '12 at 23:25
    
Ah, thanks. It might be tricky for it to actually call it though (unless it was implemented in C++ ;-). Answer accepted. – jxh Aug 8 '12 at 23:27
    
I think this is wrong! the extern "C" is for declaring that a function should not contain the parameter types in the link name (name mangled) that is the way C++ do function overloading. This way C++ can use plain C libraries, like stdlib. – epatel Aug 8 '12 at 23:34
1  
@epatel There's no requirement that the C and C++ ABI's be the same and the standard is quite explicit in that function types have a language linkage separate from the function's name. One example it specifically calls out is calling conventions. – bames53 Aug 9 '12 at 0:02

The braces are used when you have many declarations and definitions. Often you can see a start and end in header files for C code to be usable in C++

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif

// C stuff here to be available for C++ code

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

I can recommend reading about "name mangling" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Name_mangling The extern "C" is a key to fallback to C linkage name conventions.

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extern "C" int foo1 (void (*)());
extern "C" { int foo2 (void (*)()); }

Those are the same. The main reason to use braces is if you have more than one function, e.g:

extern "C" int foo1 (void (*)());
extern "C" int foo2 (void (*)());
extern "C" int foo3 (void (*)());
extern "C" int foo4 (void (*)());

that can be written more simply as:

extern "C" {
    int foo1 (void (*)());
    int foo2 (void (*)());
    int foo3 (void (*)());
    int foo4 (void (*)());
}

Additionally, if you're trying to make one header file that works with both C and C++, you might want to write that as:

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif

    int foo1 (void (*)());
    int foo2 (void (*)());
    int foo3 (void (*)());
    int foo4 (void (*)());

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

P.S. I'm not aware of any compilers where there's a difference between "C++ linkage" or "C linkage" for function pointers. When we talk about C or C++ linkage, we're talking about how the name gets mangled by the compiler. For a function pointer, you're passing a pointer, so the name is irrelevant. It's important that the calling convention is the same, but it usually is the same for C and C++, since people freely mix those languages.

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The standard discusses "C" and "C++" linkage for both names and for function types. It's used where C and C++ ABI's differ from each other. – bames53 Aug 8 '12 at 23:35
    
I've edited the answer to say that "I'm not aware of any compilers where there's a difference" instead of "There is no difference". For a new programmer, with normal compilers, there is no difference that matters. – user9876 Aug 9 '12 at 11:43

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