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I'm learning to use the main types in C#. For this purpose I made a simple algorithm for finding vowels in a string. Here it is:

 public static string Vowels()
        {
            string myString = "Count the number of the vowels in this string";
            string output = string.Empty;
            for (int i = 0; i < myString.Length; i++)
            {
                if (myString[i] == 'a' || myString[i] == 'e' ||
                    myString[i] == 'i' || myString[i] == 'o' ||
                    myString[i] == 'u')
                {
                    output += myString[i].ToString().ToUpper(); //Vowel
                }

            }
            return output;
        }

The thing is that first - I don't like so many conditions in my if statement so I think that using some referent type would be a more elegant way to hold the vowels in, and second, even if there is a good reason to choose if statement instead struct, enum or any other type I want to learn to use them too. Could you help me with the best way to look up for each character in myString string using struct or enum (which you think is better) to hold the vowels in it?

Thanks

Leron

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1  
@DJKRAZE: I don't see how that's relevant to the question, really. –  Jon Skeet Aug 8 '12 at 22:20
    
Yeah, I'm really sorry for this. I thought the task is suitable for using enums, and you just answer to my question. If there is a problem it's in me, what I was searching for was exactly what you wrote in your answer. And I'm thankfull to you, Jon Skeet and the others for pointing my mistakes. –  Leron Aug 9 '12 at 15:37
    
@Leron No problem at all. –  ispiro Aug 10 '12 at 13:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe this is what you're looking for:

Enum.GetNames(typeof(myenum)).Contains(...);

Use like this:

enum myenum { a, e, i, o, u }

And:

for (int i = 0; i < mystring.Length; i++)
    if (Enum.GetNames(typeof(myenum)).Contains(mystring.Substring(i, 1)))
        Text = "True";

For finding fields in a struct (or class, for that matter), use something like:

System.Reflection.FieldInfo[] fi = typeof(mystruct).GetFields();
Text = fi[0].Name;

As others have pointed out - I'm not saying this is the correct way to execute this task. I'm just answering what seems to be the main point - how to get a list of parts of these objects.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that was the kind of thing I was looking for. I wasn't sure if enum or struct is better but definetly I wanted to see something very similar to what you've wrote! –  Leron Aug 8 '12 at 23:11
1  
The answer works, but... NEVER actually do this! Enum.GetNames is essentially a simple form of reflection; it's going to be much slower than a more natural C#-esque solution; this is not at all comparable to javascript which is optimized for precisely that kind of access. Furthermore, you're undermining any safety the compiler tries to help you get in avoiding simple mistakes, and your code is longer and harder to read to boot! –  Eamon Nerbonne Aug 8 '12 at 23:21
    
Will remember this for the obfuscated C# contest. :) –  aquinas Aug 9 '12 at 0:35
    
What Eamon said - this is not a good example of a situation where it makes sense to use an enum. –  Jon Skeet Aug 9 '12 at 7:32
1  
@ispiro: Yes, I'm not having a go at your answer - I just don't think taking this approach "Here's a task - now how do I do it with enums?" is the best way for the OP to learn how to use enums in the first place. –  Jon Skeet Aug 9 '12 at 11:33

It's not really a helpful way to think about completing tasks in programming... particularly this one. In this case, you're doing data processing which is a much better fit for LINQ. For example, your method can be implemented as:

public static string ExtractVowels(string text)
{
    // Note that this won't find upper-case vowels...
    var vowelArray = text.Where(c => "aeiou".Contains(c))
                         .ToArray();
    // Upper-case it if you want, of course.
    return new string(vowelArray);
}

No need for an enum or anything like it. You should be thinking about the steps involved in a task, and then think about whether that requires storing state, and if so what kind of state, etc.

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Well, again an elegant solution but I'm trying to follow a book on C# and just use the examples to try thing on my own. The standart example for using struct is with Days but I think something like vowels maybe are suitable too. I'm more interested in leraning how to work withs structures than solving this particular example. I'm looking for something like InStruct() method to check each char but I can't find such an example so I'm asking here for the best solution. –  Leron Aug 8 '12 at 22:24
    
return new string(text.Where(c => "aeiou".Contains(c)).Select(c => Char.ToUpper(c)).ToArray()); //With ToUpper –  user1154664 Aug 8 '12 at 22:33
1  
@Leron: No, I really don't think vowels are a particularly suitable example. What would InStruct even do? What would the fields in your struct be? Again, it's not worth trying to bend the task to the topic you happen to want to study - you need to find an appropriate task. –  Jon Skeet Aug 9 '12 at 7:32
    
Thanks. I see now that I mislead you with my question due to my lack of knowledge but really appreciate your help. Gonna search some tutorials for structs and enums instead ot making tasks on my own which could lead me to a wrong path. –  Leron Aug 9 '12 at 15:43

structs, enums and classes are all fixed-size (and very, very simple) data structures. I.e., each a struct always holds the same amount of information, no matter its value. Unlike javascript, you cannot dynamically add members to a C# struct.

You're trying to find all instances of characters in some set - and although you happen to know the size of that set, you've noticed that it's not a very general solution. In general, sets are not fixed size: so there's no solution to "just use a struct". You're looking at the wrong level of abstraction here.

The equivalent of a javascript object (where you could just add members a e i o u and then use that object to check whether a letter occurs as a member) in .NET is a Dictionary<string, object>. However, you know that your keys are single letters so you can use char rather than string, and you furthermore don't need to save any values with those keys (you care only about presence/absence of keys) so you can use a HashSet<char>.

In any case; in general you can't easily map a dynamic value such as some input letter to a static notion such as a type's member (at least not without slow, unhandy, error-prone techniques such as reflection). And although enum values are runtime (dynamic) variables, you can't use them easily either since (1) you can't really easily convert char into enum nicely without something at least as complex as a large if statement, and (2) even if you could, you normally cannot test whether enums are members of some set any better that you could check whether char's are members of some set.

To recap: enum's don't help and char->enum is not a "trivial" conversion, and a structs members are static notion which you can't really compare with a dynamic notion such as the value of a letter.

Another minor detail: your example method will produce incorrect output given the input "Another minor detail"...

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What do you mean by incorrect output? The fact that I'm not checking for uppercase vowels or something else? I want to put the vowels ina struct and look if a character from my string matches any of the struct attribute, that was my idea for imlementing it... –  Leron Aug 8 '12 at 22:27
    
Well, since it's a learning experience; you should try it... ...but you're right that it's the uppercase letters I'm referring to. –  Eamon Nerbonne Aug 8 '12 at 22:59
    
When you say "put them in a struct" do you mean kindof like adding members to a javascript object and then using that to checking whether each letter is a member? –  Eamon Nerbonne Aug 8 '12 at 23:01
    
Well, yes, I'mm wondering this because I've seen a similar stuff in PHP and JavaScript, but in fact the closest to what I want is the answer of ispiro, above yours. I just want to get struct and enum data types to work since I'm coming from PHP where there are not such types and it's a new stuff for me that I want to experiment with. –  Leron Aug 8 '12 at 23:09
    
Nice explanation Eamon, thanks. I thought that eventually I'll end up with Collections but I'm still too noob to figure out by myself what is appropriate what is not to use in a current situation. That said I really appreciate your answer. –  Leron Aug 8 '12 at 23:22

" I don't like so many conditions in my if statement " can be resolved like this:

 public static string Vowels()
    {
        string myString = "Count the number of the vowels in this string";
        string output = string.Empty;
        for (int i = 0; i < myString.Length; i++)
        {
            switch(myString[i])
            {
               case 'a':
               case 'e':
               case 'i':
               case 'o':
               case 'u':
                  output += myString[i].ToString().ToUpper(); //Vowel
                  break;
            }

        }
        return output;
    }

and if you want to extract the letters entirely from the function, try:

 string Vowels = "aeiou";
 public static string Vowels()
    {
        string myString = "Count the number of the vowels in this string";
        string output = string.Empty;
        for (int i = 0; i < myString.Length; i++)
        {
            if(Vowels.Contains(myString[i]))
            {
                  output += myString[i].ToString().ToUpper(); //Vowel
                  break;
            }

        }
        return output;
    }
share|improve this answer

Here's a couple of different ways to accomplish your task.

This one is simple:

private static readonly char[] vowel = "aeiouAEIOU".ToArray() ;
public static string ExtractVowels_1( string s )
{
  if ( s == null ) throw new ArgumentNullException("s");

  StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder( s.Length ) ;

  for ( int i = s.IndexOfAny(vowel) ;  i >= 0 ; i = s.IndexOfAny(vowel , i+1 ) )
  {
    sb.Append(s[i]) ;
  }

  return sb.ToString() ;
}

This is even simpler:

private static readonly Regex rxVowels = new Regex( "[^aeiou]+" , RegexOptions.IgnoreCase ) ;
public static string ExtractVowels_2( string s )
{
  string vowels  = rxVowels.Replace( s , "" ) ;
  return vowels ;
}

You can get all Linqy, "fluent" if you will:

    private static readonly SortedSet<char> setOfVowels = new SortedSet<char>( "aeiouAEIOU" ) ;
    private static string ExtractVowels_3( string s )
    {
        if ( s == null ) throw new ArgumentNullException("s");

        string vowels = new string( s.Where( c => setOfVowels.Contains(c) ).ToArray() ) ;
        return vowels ;

    }

As the Perl Monks say, "Tim Toady" or TMTOWTDI: There's more than one way to do it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/There's_more_than_one_way_to_do_it

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