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Related to Handling HTTP ContentEncoding "deflate", I'd like to know how to use an OutputStream to inflate both gzip and deflate streams. Here's why:

I have a class that fetches resources from a web server (think wget, but in Java). I have it strictly-enforcing the Content-Length of the response and I'd like to keep that enforcement. So, what I'd like to do is read a specific number of bytes from the response (which I'm already doing) but have it generate more bytes if the response has been compressed.

I have this working for deflate responses like this:

OutputStream out = System.out;
out = new InflateOutputStream(out);
// repeatedly:
out.write(compressedBytesFromResponse);

I'd like to be able to do the same thing with gzip responses, but without a GunzipOutputStream, I'm not sure what to do, next.

Update

I was considering building something like this, but it seemed completely insane. Perhaps that is the only way to use an OutputStream to inflate my data.

share|improve this question
    
Potential duplicate to stackoverflow.com/questions/2474193/… – Adam Zalcman Aug 8 '12 at 22:36
    
Respectfully, @AdamZalcman, that question is about using GZIPInputStream. I'm looking for something that uncompresses data but exists as an OutputStream. – Christopher Schultz Aug 9 '12 at 0:19

For deflate, Java has InflaterOutputStream that does what you need: feed it compressed deflated data and it sends the uncompressed data to its underlying output stream.


For gzip... can't seem to find an equivalent. InflaterOutputStream's companion, InflaterInputStream, has a GZipInputStream subclass that processes all the headers, but there is no equivalent decompressing output stream class that would potentially be a subclass of InflaterOutputStream.

Build the subclass of InflaterOutputStream yourself for GZIP would look pretty hairy, looking at source for GZipInputStream (dealing with headers, trailers, etc.)

Using piped streams seems like the lesser of two evils.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I'll use a pair of Piped(Input|Output)Streams and a pump-thread before I write my own 'native' GunzipOutputStream. – Christopher Schultz Aug 9 '12 at 2:33
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Answering my own question:

There are two possibilities, here: gunzip on output (e.g. use GunzipOutputStream, not provided by the Java API), or gunzip on input (e.g. use GZIPInputStream, provided by the Java API) plus enforce the Content-Length during the reads.

I have done both, and I think I prefer the latter because a) it does not require a separate thread to be launched to pump bytes from PipedOutputStream to a PipedIOnputStream and b) (a corollary, I guess) it does not have such a threat of race-conditions and other synchronization issues.

First, here is my implementation of LimitedInputStream, which allows me to wrap the input stream and enforce a limit on the amount of data read. Note that I also have a BigLimitedInputStream that uses a BigInteger count to support Content-Length values greater than Long.MAX_LONG:

public class LimitedInputStream
    extends InputStream
{
    private long _limit;
    private long _read;
    private InputStream _in;

    public LimitedInputStream(InputStream in, long limit)
    {
        _limit= limit;
        _in = in;
        _read = 0;
    }
    @Override
    public int available()
        throws IOException
    {
        return _in.available(); // sure?
    }

    @Override
    public void close()
        throws IOException
    {
        _in.close();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean markSupported()
    {
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public int read()
        throws IOException
    {
        int read = _in.read();

        if(-1 == read)
            return -1;

        ++_read;

        if(_read > _limit)
            return -1;
            // throw new IOException("Read limit reached: " + _limit);

        return read;
    }

    @Override
    public int read(byte[] b)
        throws IOException
    {
        return read(b, 0, b.length);
    }

    @Override
    public int read(byte[] b, int off, int len)
        throws IOException
    {
        // 'len' is an int, so 'max' is an int; narrowing cast is safe
        int max = (int)Math.min((long)(_limit - _read), (long)len);

        if(0 == max && len > 0)
            return -1;
            //throw new IOException("Read limit reached: " + _limit);

        int read = _in.read(b, off, max);

        _read += read;

        // This should never happen
        if(_read > _limit)
            return -1;
            //throw new IOException("Read limit reached: " + _limit);

        return read;
    }

    @Override
    public long skip(long n)
        throws IOException
    {
        long max = Math.min((long)(_limit - _read), n);

        if(0 == max)
            return 0;

        long read = _in.skip(max);

        _read += read;

        return read;
    }
}

Using the above class to wrap the InputStream obtained from the HttpURLConnection allows me to simplify the existing code I had to read the precise number of bytes mentioned in the Content-Length header and just blindly copy input to output. I then wrap the input stream (already wrapped in the LimitedInputStream) in a GZIPInputStream to decompress, and just pump the bytes from (doubly-wrapped) input to output.

The less-straightforward route is to pursue my original line of though: to wrap the OutputStream using (what turned out to be) an awkward class: GunzipOutputStream. I have written a GunzipOutputStream which uses an internal thread to pump bytes through a pair of piped streams. It's ugly, and it's based upon code from OpenRDF's GunzipOutputStream. I think mine is a bit simpler:

public class GunzipOutputStream
    extends OutputStream
{
    final private Thread _pump;

    // Streams
    final private PipedOutputStream _zipped;  // Compressed bytes are written here (by clients)
    final private PipedInputStream _pipe; // Compressed bytes are read (internally) here
    final private OutputStream _out; // Uncompressed data is written here (by the pump thread)

    // Internal state
    private IOException _e;

    public GunzipOutputStream(OutputStream out)
        throws IOException
    {
        _zipped = new PipedOutputStream();
        _pipe = new PipedInputStream(_zipped);
        _out = out;
        _pump = new Thread(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                InputStream in = null;
                try
                {
                    in = new GZIPInputStream(_pipe);

                    pump(in, _out);
                }
                catch (IOException e)
                {
                    _e = e;
                    System.err.println(e);
                    _e.printStackTrace();
                }
                finally
                {
                    try { in.close(); } catch (IOException ioe)
                    { ioe.printStackTrace(); }
                }
            }

            private void pump(InputStream in, OutputStream out)
                throws IOException
            {
                long count = 0;

                byte[] buf = new byte[4096];

                int read;
                while ((read = in.read(buf)) >= 0) {
                    System.err.println("===> Pumping " + read + " bytes");
                    out.write(buf, 0, read);
                    count += read;
                }
                out.flush();
                System.err.println("===> Pumped a total of " + count + " bytes");
            }
        }, "GunzipOutputStream stream pump " + GunzipOutputStream.this.hashCode());

        _pump.start();
    }

    public void close() throws IOException {
        throwIOException();
        _zipped.close();
        _pipe.close();
        _out.close();
    }

    public void flush() throws IOException {
        throwIOException();
        _zipped.flush();
    }

    public void write(int b) throws IOException {
        throwIOException();
        _zipped.write(b);
    }

    public void write(byte[] b) throws IOException {
        throwIOException();
        _zipped.write(b);
    }

    public void write(byte[] b, int off, int len) throws IOException {
        throwIOException();
        _zipped.write(b, off, len);
    }

    public String toString() {
        return _zipped.toString();
    }

    protected void finish()
        throws IOException
    {
        try
        {
            _pump.join();
            _pipe.close();
            _zipped.close();
        }
        catch (InterruptedException ie)
        {
            // Ignore
        }
    }

    private void throwIOException()
        throws IOException
    {
        if(null != _e)
        {
            IOException e = _e;
            _e = null; // Clear the existing error
            throw e;
        }
    }
}

Again, this works, but it seems fairly ... fragile.

In the end, I re-factored my code to use the LimitedInputStream and GZIPInputStream and didn't use the GunzipOutputStream. If the Java API provided a GunzipOutputStream, it would have been great. But it doesn't, and without writing a "native" gunzip algorithm, implementing your own GunzipOutputStream stretches the limits of propriety.

share|improve this answer

If you use HttpURLConnection all this stuff happens automatically.

share|improve this answer
    
Oddly enough, I'm using HttpURLConnection, and no, it doesn't happen automatically. – Christopher Schultz Aug 9 '12 at 0:18
    
@ChristopherSchultz Hmm, that's odd! let me check ... – EJP Aug 9 '12 at 3:21

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