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I am currently having an issue with using a function defined as a const in the base class.

I am implementing a derived class using the above virtual function but with a non const return value. I would like to implement this without changing the base class as there are other outside classes that use this virtual function. The reason for not changing this virtual function is that there exists other derived classes that use the same function.

Any help greatly appreciated.

For example: I am working on a implementing a derived class function double DerivedClass1::Function() with varying return values which is a virtual function defined in double BaseClass::Function() const. This same function is used by double DerivedClass2::function() const and double DerivedClass3::Function() const for which I have no control over. How do I do this without any or minimal changes to the base class.

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You should add the function signatures in the base and derived types (const return type can be interpreted as different things, the top level qualifier is dropped by the compiler, but it might be returning a const reference...) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 8 '12 at 22:38
    
Just added more details via an example. Hope it is better –  lordlabakdas Aug 8 '12 at 23:18
    
"the above virtual function" Above where? –  Code-Apprentice Aug 8 '12 at 23:37
2  
Is there a reason that the function cannot be const in your new derived class? –  Code-Apprentice Aug 8 '12 at 23:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have:

struct Base {
    virtual double Function() const;
};

struct Derived1 : Base {
    virtual double Function() const;
};

struct Derived2 : Base {
    virtual double Function() const;
};

You want:

struct Derived1 : Base {
    virtual double Function(); // overrides virtual function in base
};

So, first thing you need to add a non-const virtual function to Base, otherwise you're not overriding anything. The question is, what should the base class function be defined as? For minimal disruption it should do the same thing that calling the function via a non-const reference currently does -- call the const function:

struct Base {
    virtual double Function() const;
    virtual double Function() { return static_cast<const Base*>(this)->Function(); }
};

struct Derived1 : Base {
    virtual double Function() const;
    virtual double Function();
};

struct Derived2 : Base {
    virtual double Function() const;
    // no need to override non-const Function
};

I think this could still potentially break existing code, for example if you took pointers to the const and non-const versions of the function, then previously they would compare equal and now they don't:

typedef double (Base::*constfunc)() const;
typedef double (Base::*mutfunc)();
((mutfunc)(constfunc(&Base::Function)) == (mutfunc(&Base::Function))); // was true, now false

For typical users of the Base class, adding the new function is probably harmless.

However, you say: "using the above virtual function but with a non const return value", and your example function already has a non-const return value (double) even with the const version of the function. So answers can't address this, and it's possible that by concealing your real use-case, you're getting worse answers than you would with an example that better reflects your actual code.

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Your solution works for me. Although I do not understand if double should not be included for a const function. –  lordlabakdas Aug 9 '12 at 0:15
    
There's nothing wrong with a const function that returns double, my point is just that you said "I want X but with Y", and in your example X already has Y. So there's some kind of contradiction in what you asked for, but perhaps not an important one. I wondered if maybe your real function was returning a reference, and you wanted the non-const version of the function to return reference-to-non-const. If so then there are some ritual words of warning about accessors that some people would want to intone :-) –  Steve Jessop Aug 9 '12 at 0:31
    
My function does not return a reference. And yes, I think what you had posted works. Although, I am not sure how virtual double Function() const; and virtual double Function(); are differentiated when called. To be clear, how does the compiler know which function is called assuming the Function() are the same function names. Please do correct me if am wrong. –  lordlabakdas Aug 9 '12 at 0:41
    
It calls the one that corresponds to the const-ness of the variable, reference, or pointer on which the member function is called. You can imagine that this is an extra parameter to the call, with type Base* for the non-const function and const Base* for the const function. Then the overload to call is selected just like any other function that is overloaded on a pointer-to-const vs pointer-to-non-const parameter. Or an alternative way to remember that they differ: the mangled names of the const and non-const functions will be different. –  Steve Jessop Aug 9 '12 at 0:43
    
cool. thanks a lot. –  lordlabakdas Aug 9 '12 at 0:49

I'm not sure if I fully understand you, but maybe this is what you want:

struct BaseClass {
    virtual double Function() {return const_cast<const BaseClass*>(this)->Function();}
    virtual double Function() const=0;
    virtual BaseClass() {}
};
struct DerivedClass1: public BaseClass {
    virtual double Function() {stuff};
    virtual double Function() const {throw std::logic_error("UNIMPLEMENTED");};
};
struct DerivedClass2: public BaseClass {
    virtual double Function() const {stuff};
};

Needless to say, this is a very bad idea. The BaseClass implementation will redirect mutable instances to the existing const functions, unless they've been overriden by a derived class, as you want to do in DerivedClass1. The problem is if you call Function() on a const DerivedClass1, then you get an exception at run-time.

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Thanks. this would also help –  lordlabakdas Aug 9 '12 at 0:17

A derived method that wants to override a virtual base method MUST use the exact same signature as the base method, including uses of const, or else the derived method will merely hide the base method instead of overriding it. You cannot change the signature in a derived class if you intend to override.

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