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The following program, was compiled and tested, it sometimes return the result, and sometimes fills the screen with

java.lang.StackOverflowError
at scala.BigInt$.apply(BigInt.scala:47)
at scala.BigInt.equals(BigInt.scala:129)
at scala.runtime.BoxesRunTime.equals(Unknown Source)
at bigint$.factorial(fact2.scala:3)
at bigint$.factorial(fact2.scala:3)
...

The program:

object bigint extends Application {
  def factorial(n: BigInt): BigInt = if (n == 0) 1 else n * factorial(n-1)
  println("4391! = "+factorial(4391))
}

My questions:

  • Is it because there is a stack overflow on the JVM, which sometimes happens and sometimes doesn't?
  • Is this nondeterministic behavior considered a bug?
  • I assume Scala did not tail-recursed this? how can I make it tail-recurse this?

Details:

Scala compiler version 2.7.5.final -- Copyright 2002-2009, LAMP/EPFL Scala code runner version 2.7.5.final -- Copyright 2002-2009, LAMP/EPFL

java version "1.6.0_0" OpenJDK Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_0-b11) OpenJDK Client VM (build 1.6.0_0-b11, mixed mode, sharing)

Ubuntu 2.6.24-24-generic

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What do you mean by "couldn't see the first line of this"? Can you pipe the output into a file? –  bcml Jul 27 '09 at 10:35
    
@msiemeri, strangely when I "scala bigint > file" it only works when the program doesn't crush. –  Liran Orevi Jul 27 '09 at 10:43
1  
Did you try "scala bigint > file 2>&1" as well? With 2>&1 it redirects output of stderr to the stdout sink (which is, in this case, 'file'). –  bcml Jul 27 '09 at 12:03
    
Thanks @msiemeri, edited the error part. –  Liran Orevi Jul 27 '09 at 12:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Tail-call optimization will only work in Scala if the recursive call is the last statement in the function. It's very limited. The Scala book says:

[...] tail-call optimization is limited to situations in which a method or nested function calls itself directly as its last operation, without going through a function value or some other intermediary.

In your case, the recursive call is part of a larger expression, and is not itself the very last operation - the last operation here is the multiplication.

This article demonstrates how to make it work:

class Factorial {
  def factorial(n: Int): Int = {
    def factorialAcc(acc: Int, n: Int): Int = {
      if (n <= 1) acc
      else factorialAcc(n * acc, n - 1)
    }
    factorialAcc(1, n)
  }
}
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I'm not sure I understand, println isn't a part of the factorial function, or is it? –  Liran Orevi Jul 27 '09 at 10:35
    
You're right, I misread your code (I've reformatted it to make it a bit clearer, and I'll update my answer). –  skaffman Jul 27 '09 at 10:53
    
It worked, well done, also thanks for the link to the great article on the subject. –  Liran Orevi Jul 28 '09 at 13:13

In Scala 2.8 you can use the @tailrec annotation when you expect that tail call optimization should be used, and get a warning if it's not possible for the compiler to do so.

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Thanks, have you used it? not sure it was released yet. scala-lang.org/downloads –  Liran Orevi Sep 23 '09 at 8:44

If you really have large numbers, there are many approximations, for example this one in Scala that uses prime factorization:

class SwingFactorial(n: Int) {

  def name() = "SwingFactorial"

  def value(): BigInt =
    {
      if (n < 0)
         {
          throw new IllegalArgumentException(
          "Factorial: n has to be >= 0, but was " + n)
         }

      ndiv2OddFact = BigInt(1)
      ndiv4OddFact = ndiv2OddFact

      return oddFactorial(n) << (n - MathFun.bitCount(n))
    }

  private def oddFactorial(n: Int): BigInt =
    {
      val oddFact =
      if (n < Small.oddFactorial.length)
        {
          BigInt(Small.oddFactorial(n))
        }
      else
        {
          val of = oddFactorial(n / 2)
          (of * of) * oddSwing(n)
        }

      ndiv4OddFact = ndiv2OddFact
      ndiv2OddFact = oddFact
      return oddFact
    }

  private def oddSwing(n: Int): BigInt =
    {
      if (n < Small.oddSwing.length)
      {
        return BigInt(Small.oddSwing(n))
      }

      val len = if ((n % 4) != 2) (n - 1) / 4 + 1 else (n - 1) / 4
      val high = n - ((n + 1) & 1)
      val ndiv4 = n / 4
      val oddFact = if (ndiv4 < Small.oddFactorial.length)
            BigInt(Small.oddFactorial(ndiv4)) else ndiv4OddFact

      return product(high, len) / oddFact
    }

    private def product(m: Int, len: Int): BigInt =
    {
      if (len == 1) return BigInt(m) 
      if (len == 2) {val M = m.toLong; return BigInt(M * (M - 2))}

      val hlen = len >>> 1
      return product(m - hlen * 2, len - hlen) * product(m, hlen)
    }

  private var ndiv4OddFact = BigInt(1)
  private var ndiv2OddFact = BigInt(1)
} 

Usage:

var fs = new SwingFactorial(n)
val a = fs.value()
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