Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using MEX to interface my C++ code with MATLAB. My C++ code requires the output be of type vector . Since I am new to C++ I am extremely confused with how the pointers work. I will take an input array from MATLAB

int *data_array_ptr
data_array_ptr=(int *)mxGetData(prhs[0]);
a = mxGetM(prhs[0]);
int int_data[a];
copy(*data_array_ptr, *data_array_ptr+ a, int_data);

Now, int_data is supposed to have all the data that is stored at the location of data_array_ptr... Does it do this?

Then,

double *data_out_ptr;

plhs[0]= mxCreateDoubleMatrix( (mwSize)m, (mwSize)n, mxREAL); 
data_out_ptr= mxGetPr(plhs[0]);
len6=mxGetM(plhs[0]);
vector<double> data_out_data(*data_out_ptr,*data_out_ptr+len6);

This should put the contents of the empty output matrix into a vector named data_out_data. Does it do this?

Then, I want to pass both data_out_data and int_data to a c++ function. However, I want to pass data_out_data as a pointer so that the c++ function will fill the vector with data and then when the function finishes, the MEX function will see the now filled vector and be able to convert it back to an array of doubles that can fill plhs[0].

So, something like

mexFunction(plhs[],prhs[]){

int *data_array_ptr
data_array_ptr=(int *)mxGetData(prhs[0]);
a = mxGetM(prhs[0]);
int int_data[a];
copy(*data_array_ptr, *data_array_ptr+ a, int_data);

 double *data_out_ptr;
plhs[0]= mxCreateDoubleMatrix( (mwSize)m, (mwSize)n, mxREAL); 
data_out_ptr= mxGetPr(plhs[0]);
len6=mxGetM(plhs[0]);
vector<double> data_out_data(*data_out_ptr,*data_out_ptr+len6);



foo(int_data, *data_out_data)

copy(data_out_data.begin(), data_out_data.end(), data_out_ptr);
}

and on the return of foo, data_out_data will be filled. My function has no return arguments an data_out_data must be of type vector. How do I pass the vector to foo so that foo can edit the data?

Thanks!!

share|improve this question
    
Don't dereference the pointers in copy or the constructor arguments of vector. –  celtschk Aug 8 '12 at 23:03
    
What's a? What's n? –  Aesthete Aug 8 '12 at 23:29
    
@Aesthete a gets set to the size of the input array, and m and n are the size of the output array, say m=1 and n=4 –  user1586097 Aug 9 '12 at 2:44

2 Answers 2

You are dereferencing your pointers more than you should...

int *data_array_ptr;
// ...
copy(*data_array_ptr, *data_array_ptr+ a, int_data);

When you are asked to provide a begin- and end-pointer to copy, you need to do this:

copy(data_array_ptr, data_array_ptr+ a, int_data);

Now you have provided two memory addresses. The first, data_array_ptr, is the address of the start of your array. The second, data_array_ptr+a is the address of the element just after the end of your array.

If you dereference the pointer (*data_array_ptr) then you are asking for the value (an int) of the first element of the array. Likewise, *data_array_ptr+a will first take the value of the first array element and then add a to it. This is not what you want.

So, change all your calls to copy as suggested, as well as your vector constructor.

As for your question about your foo function, if you need to pass a vector then declare it like this:

void foo( int * int_data, std::vector<double> & data_out_data )

Assuming definitions of these variables that you have provided above. I take it you are calling like this:

// ...

int int_data[a];
copy(*data_array_ptr, *data_array_ptr+ a, int_data);

// ...

vector<double> data_out_data(data_out_ptr, data_out_ptr+len6);

// ...

foo( int_data, data_out_data );

Note that if you don't know the length of your int_data array inside foo (based on the length of data_out_data) you should also require a size in the argument list of foo:

foo( int_data, a, data_out_data );
share|improve this answer
    
this was super helpful thanks! If I need to call foo with a pointer to the vector so that inside foo, the pointer can be dereferenced, then classes will be called with the dereferenced data, then the classes will return new data, and then teh pointer will point to the new data for the MEX function to see at the return of foo. –  user1586097 Aug 8 '12 at 23:42
    
Well that's fine. I specified a reference to the vector instead of a pointer. You can use pointer if you like, but reference is more common when passing STL containers around. You can still take the address of the reference object inside foo to get a pointer (ie &data_out_data). The point here is that you are passing into foo a reference to your local copy of the vector. So any changes made to the vector during the call to foo will be there when foo returns. –  paddy Aug 8 '12 at 23:56
    
OK I think Im confused between a reference and a pointer. –  user1586097 Aug 9 '12 at 2:13
    
if I call foo like foo(int_data, &data_out_data) and foo is defined as foo(int int_data[], vector<double> *data_out_data) then the address of the first element of data_out_data will be dereferenced into foo? Or do I still need to do something to pass that vector reference onto another class? Or should foo be defined as &data_out_data instead of *data_out_data? @paddy –  user1586097 Aug 9 '12 at 2:21
    
@user1586097 No, data_out_data is a vector of doubles. So you are not passing a pointer to the first element - you are passing a pointer to the vector (an instance of the class vector<double>). The function call and declaration you gave there are fine, if you want to pass your vector as a pointer. A reference is almost the same as a pointer, except syntactically you use it as if it wasn't a pointer. So to append to a vector pointer you'd use v->push_back(), but if it was a vector reference you'd use v.push_back(). You don't have to explicitly reference or dereference references! –  paddy Aug 9 '12 at 3:44

I'm not sure I understand your question correctly. I believe you want to pass an array from MATLAB to your mex function, the mex function then calls a C++ function that operates on this data array, and a vector. The vector then contains the result of whatever the C++ function does, and you want to pass this data back to MATLAB.


First, let's deal with getting the data from MATLAB into your MEX function

int const *data_in = static_cast<int const *>(mxGetData(prhs[0]));

Now, data_in points to the data that you passed in. By the way, are you sure the array contains ints? By default, MATLAB uses double for everything.

Is your C++ function going to modify this array? If not, you can just call it with the pointer and the number of elements, instead of performing a copy.

For instance, if the signature of foo is

foo( int const *data_in, mwSize num_data_in, std::vector<double> *data_out );

you can call it as

foo( data_in, mxGetNumberOfElements(prhs[0]), &data_out );

If you do need to modify the data, and / or cannot modify foo, just create a vector to hold a copy of the data.

std::vector<int> data_in_vec( data_in, data_in + mxGetNumberOfElements(prhs[0]) );
foo( data_in_vec.data(), data_out );

As for the foo function, does it need for the vector to be sized correctly before you call it? If so,

std::vector<double> data_out( m * n );  // creates a vector with m * n elements
foo( data_in_vec.data(), &data_out );

If possible, modify foo to accept a std::vector<double>& instead of std::vector<double> *. Then you can call it as

foo( data_in_vec.data(), data_out );

Also, given a choice, I'd have foo resize the vector as needed instead of requiring the caller to do so.


Now, getting the data back to MATLAB.

plhs[0] = mxCreateDoubleMatrix( m, n, mxReal );
std::copy( data_out.data(), data_out.data() + data_out.size(), mxGetPr(plhs[0]) );

The above line assumes that the size of the vector is not greater than m * n

Remember that MATLAB stores matrices in column-major format, unlike C & C++. Depending on how the foo function works, you may have to transpose the returned vector, in which case you cannot use std::copy to do the copying, you'll have to write nested loops.

share|improve this answer
    
From Matlab, the array will already be sized correctly so that isnt a problem, I have other classes that are called inside foo that will fill the data in the data_out vector. The classes are already written and only accept vectors, I was hoping to possibly pass a pointer into foo for the vector data_out and then call the classes with the empty vector, and then after the classes fill data_out, the pointer now sees the new data and therefore so will my MEX function. –  user1586097 Aug 8 '12 at 23:39
    
@user1586097 You cannot pass the vector back to MATLAB or make both the vector and the matrix created by mxCreateDoubleMatrix share the same data buffer. After foo is done operating on the vector you'll have to copy the contents of the vector back into the matrix in plhs[0]. –  Praetorian Aug 9 '12 at 0:22
    
If I call foo like you say: If possible, modify foo to accept a std::vector<double>& instead of std::vector<double> *. Then you can call it as foo( data_in_vec.data(), data_out ) If I were to pass data_out to another class, will it be the address of the first element of the data vector or will it be the actual data? My class requires an actual vector. But I also want the vector that the class edits to be seen on the return of foo in MEX. –  user1586097 Aug 9 '12 at 2:36
    
@user1586097 Here's an answer explaining the difference between a pointer and a reference. A reference refers to the original variable and so you can do whatever with it that you could've using the original variable. Also, if you make modifications to the reference it modifies the original variable also (since they're both the same anyway) –  Praetorian Aug 9 '12 at 16:02
    
Thank you. Now my problem is with the copy(data_array_ptr, data_array_ptr+ a, int_data) This line should be taking the entire array that data_array_ptr is pointing to, and recasting it to whatever int_data is, which is in this case an array of integers. So then int_data would have the data from data_array_ptr but casted as type int.However, the compiler tells me that int_data is of type int* –  user1586097 Aug 9 '12 at 16:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.