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What is the best way to abstract away 3rd party dependencies, when using Ninject with ASP.NET MVC?

Usually, I do something like this:

public interface IProductRepository
{
    IEnumerable<Product> GetProducts();
}

public class ProductRespository : IProductRepository
{
    public IEnumerable<Product> GetProducts()
    {
        ...
    }
}

And then in the controller:

public class ProductController : Controller
{
    private IProductRepository repository;

    public ProductController(IProductRepository repository)
    {
        this.repository = repository;
    }

    ...
}

And then I use Ninject to automatically inject the solid ProductRepository into the controller.

But how do I do this if the dependency is 3rd party? For example, I'm using FlickrNet.

public class ProductController : Controller
{
    private Flickr flickr;

    ...
}

I'd like to be able to abstract the Flickr object away into an interface so that I can use dependency injection and make it easier to unit test. I know I could create a 'service' type interface and then implement a class based off of that which would wrap the Flickr object.

But I would have to define a member in the interface corresponding to each member of the Flickr object, and then map each of these in the wrapper object. And there are lots and lots of members in the Flickr object.

Is there any better way to deal with this? My main goal is to make it easy to mock the Flickr dependency in unit tests.

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Are the methods in the Flicker object virtual by chance? –  Brian Dishaw Aug 9 '12 at 1:48
    
@BrianDishaw No, they aren't. –  Alex Schimp Aug 9 '12 at 1:55
1  
That would be too easy I guess. Seems like you have to wrap it and create an interface.. Maybe there are code generators that could write the boiler plate for you? –  Brian Dishaw Aug 9 '12 at 1:58
2  
This is not a problem with DI but a general architectural problem. You can either declare the controller as your abstraction layer or define a wrapper around the flickr component that implements a custom interface. If the methods on your 3rd party component consume more 3rd party classes you would need to abstract them away too and so on until you are down to only primitive values or more wrappers around 3rd party code. Depending on the complexity of that component this could mean a lot of mapping and wrapping. –  Sebastian Weber Aug 9 '12 at 6:00
    
I aggree with Sebastian Weber: This is not an issue of testing, ASP, or ninject. It is a architectual issue and an issue of SOLIDness. Consider retagging. –  Morten Aug 9 '12 at 8:06
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Upgraded my comment to an answer.

This is not a problem with DI but a general architectural problem. You can either declare the controller as your abstraction layer or define a wrapper around the flickr component that implements a custom interface. If the methods on your 3rd party component consume more 3rd party classes you would need to abstract them away too and so on until you are down to only primitive values or more wrappers around 3rd party code. Depending on the complexity of that component this could mean a lot of mapping and wrapping.

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I think a wrapper is the right way to go. You don't have to expose every single member of the 3rd party object -- just the ones you need. With different interfaces for different situations, the wrapper solution becomes even prettier.

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I know this article is not about unit testing, but the solution it provides would incidentally work well for mock-based unit testing as well.

http://goodcoffeegoodcode.blogspot.com/2011_04_01_archive.html

Basically, as @Brian Dishaw suggested, you need to extract interfaces from FlickrNet classes and inject those to your classes.

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The only purpose would be if you abstract away flickr .NET into a higher abstraction layer. For instance

interface IAlbumViewer
{
   IEnumerable<IImage> GetImages();
}

interface IPictureUploader
{
   string Upload(string filename, Stream image)
}

That is, create interfaces/methods that are specific for your usecases contra generic flickr interfaces. You would also benefit from that since it makes it a lot easier to add support for other image services.

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