Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Host: Win 7

I have a product that I updated today (patched if you will). I would like to see specifically which files were added to the base installation directory tree.

The expected result would ONLY display creation timestamp and full file path/name. I do not want to see directory summary information or any other breaks in the data. The output would be a very straight forward looking listing like this:

08/06/2012  11:02 AM c:\my_product_install_path\folder3\new_file_3.xml
08/06/2012  11:01 AM c:\my_product_install_path\folder2\new_file_2.c
08/06/2012  11:01 AM c:\my_product_install_path\new_file_1.h
...
...

I think from this top-down listing of the full install directory tree, I can easily see the new files from the old files by scrolling down and looking for the first file with time older than X.

How can I do this either at the Windows command shell (or in a cygwin shell)?

"dir /s /b" is very close but it does not display the creation time stamp.

You might think that "dir /s /b /T:C" would work since /T:C is for displaying the creation time but no. The /T:C option does not "overide" the /b option to display the timestamp So, somehow I need to get the benefits of the /b option with the timestamp added in.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

This is a cumbersome native solution for the command line, but it works :-)

for /d /r %F in (.) do @pushd "%F"&(for /f "eol= delims=" %S in ('2^>nul dir /tc /a-d *') do @for /f "tokens=1-4*" %A in ("%S") do @echo %A  %B %C  %~fE)&popd

It looks better when formatted across multiple lines in a batch file.

@echo off
for /d /r %%F in (.) do (
  pushd "%%F"
  for /f "eol= delims=" %%S in ('2^>nul dir /tc /a-d *') do (
    for /f "tokens=1-4*" %%A in ("%%S") do @echo %%A  %%B %%C  %%~fE
  )
  popd
)

You might want to sort the list in reverse chronological order so that all the new files are clustered at the top. It is trivial to do a chronological sort within each directory using the DIR /ODN option. But it is quite tricky to sort chronologically across all the directories. That requires parsing the time stamp info and reformatting it in a way that allows SORT to produce a chronological listing. Unfortunately, parsing the time stamp is very locale dependent.

Here is a batch solution that works with the OP's locale setting. It sorts first chronologically by creation timestamp, then alphabetically by full file path.

@echo off
setlocal
set "tempFile=%temp%\listCreateTime%random%.txt"
>"%tempFile%" (
  for /d /r %%F in (.) do (
    pushd "%%F"
    for /f "eol= delims=" %%S in ('2^>nul dir /tc /a-d *') do (
      for /f "tokens=1-6* delims=/ " %%A in ("%%S") do (
        if "%%D"=="12:00" (
          echo %%C%%A%%B%%E00:00%%~fG*%%A/%%B/%%C  %%D %%E  %%~fG
        ) else (
          echo %%C%%A%%B%%E%%D%%~fG*%%A/%%B/%%C  %%D %%E  %%~fG
        )
      )
    )
    popd
  )
)
for /f "tokens=2 delims=*" %%A in ('sort /r "%tempFile%"') do echo %%A
del "%tempFile%"

It is also possible to use WMIC to get and sort the information. It is much simpler because the timestamp is already formatted in a way that allows SORT to sort it chronologically, so there is no need to parse. It is also locale independent - it should work on any Windows machine in the world that supports WMIC. But this method is slower, and the ouput is not as easy to read. Of course extra coding could be added to parse out substrings from the timestamp and reformat to a more familiar form.

@echo off
setlocal disableDelayedExpansion
set "tempFile=%temp%\listCreateTime%random%.txt"
>"%tempFile%" (
  for /d /r %%F in (.) do (
    set "folder=%%~pnxF\"
    set "drive=%%~dF"
    setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
    2>nul wmic datafile where "drive='!drive!' and path='!folder:\=\\!'" get name, creationDate|findstr /brc:[0-9]
    endlocal
  )
)
sort /r "%tempFile%"
del "%tempFile%"

The timestamp is in YYYYMMDDhhmmss.ddddddzzzz

  • YYYY = year
  • MM = month
  • DD = day
  • hh = hour in 24 hour format
  • mm = minutes
  • ss = seconds
  • dddddd = microseconds
  • zzzz = timezone info expressed as number of minutes difference from GMT
share|improve this answer
    
EDIT - Fixed a bug in the batch code –  dbenham Aug 9 '12 at 14:08
    
EDIT - Added solutions for sorting chronologically across the directories. One solution uses DIR, the other uses WMIC. –  dbenham Aug 9 '12 at 15:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.