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Is there a way to return the difference between two arrays in JavaScript?

For example:

var a1 = ['a', 'b'];
var a2 = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd'];

// need ["c", "d"]

Any advice greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
2  
Symmetric or non-symmetric? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 30 at 18:20

26 Answers 26

up vote 23 down vote accepted

I assume you are comparing normal array. If no, you need to change for loop to for .. in loop.

function arr_diff(a1, a2)
{
  var a=[], diff=[];
  for(var i=0;i<a1.length;i++)
    a[a1[i]]=true;
  for(var i=0;i<a2.length;i++)
    if(a[a2[i]]) delete a[a2[i]];
    else a[a2[i]]=true;
  for(var k in a)
    diff.push(k);
  return diff;
}

Better solution, if you don't care about backward compatibility is using filter. But still, this solution works, so voting it down is unfair.

share|improve this answer
5  
This may work but it does three loops to accomplish what can be done in one line of code using the filter method of Array. –  Joshaven Potter Oct 26 '10 at 18:37
2  
This is wrong! You are using JS arrays as associative arrays. –  Alin Purcaru May 10 '11 at 13:34
28  
Being bad practice does not make it wrong. –  Bryan Larsen May 22 '11 at 17:38
1  
Just to be clear, this implements the symmetric difference of a1 and a2, unlike the other answers posted here. –  200_success Dec 13 '13 at 1:19
1  
It might not make it wrong but makes me vote it down –  Fabiano PS Jul 4 at 15:46
Array.prototype.diff = function(a) {
    return this.filter(function(i) {return a.indexOf(i) < 0;});
};

////////////////////  
// Examples  
////////////////////

[1,2,3,4,5,6].diff( [3,4,5] );  
// => [1, 2, 6]

["test1", "test2","test3","test4","test5","test6"].diff(["test1","test2","test3","test4"]);  
// => ["test5", "test6"]

Note indexOf and filter are not available in ie before ie9.

share|improve this answer
51  
How about converting !(a.indexOf(i) > -1) to a.indexOf(i) < 0, just for the sake of simplicity? –  Nikita Rybak Oct 26 '10 at 20:06
8  
This is wrong! filter and indexOf are recent aditions to JS and are not supported by all browsers. –  Alin Purcaru May 10 '11 at 13:36
26  
The only browser that matters that doesn't support filter and indexOf is IE8. IE9 does support them both. So it's not wrong. –  Bryan Larsen May 22 '11 at 17:37
10  
ie7 and ie8 are still (unfortunately) very relevant, however you can find polyfill code for both functions on the MDN site: developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/… developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/… Load in the code listed under "compatability" via an IE conditional & BOOM. Ie7/8 are supported. –  1nfiniti May 23 '12 at 19:22
19  
This solution has a run time of O(n^2) a linear solution would be far more efficient. –  jholloman Sep 6 '12 at 18:43

This is by far the easiest way to get exactly the result you are looking for, using jQuery:

var diff = $(old_array).not(new_array).get();

diff now contains what was in old_array that is not in new_array

share|improve this answer
4  
+1 Awesome Not sure why people did not became popular thanks –  Viren May 9 '13 at 15:18
2  
Really cool use of jQuery. –  Adam Sep 16 '13 at 14:21
    
This is the best solution! –  billybob Sep 24 '13 at 17:32
1  
Does this work with objects within arrays? –  Batman Jan 19 at 7:10

The difference method in Underscore (or its drop-in replacement, Lo-Dash) can do this too:

(R)eturns the values from array that are not present in the other arrays

_.difference([1, 2, 3, 4, 5], [5, 2, 10]);
=> [1, 3, 4]

As with any Underscore function, you could also use it in a more object-oriented style:

_([1, 2, 3, 4, 5]).difference([5, 2, 10]);
share|improve this answer
    
This one is a no brainer. No else up voted??? meh –  Fatmuemoo Jul 6 '12 at 19:59
3  
I think it's a good solution performance-wise, especially as lodash and underscore keep battling for the best implementation. Also, it's IE6-compatible. –  mahemoff Sep 7 '12 at 18:44
1  
underscore, 4k, do a lot, why not :) –  Aladdin Homs Oct 25 '12 at 8:00
4  
Beware, this implementation will not work for arrays of objects. See stackoverflow.com/q/8672383/14731 for more information. –  Gili Dec 31 '12 at 19:52
1  
As one of the answers mentions there, it works if it's the same object, but not if two objects have the same properties. I think that's okay as notions of equality vary (e.g. it could also be an "id" attribute in some apps). However, it would be good if you could pass in a comparison test to intersect(). –  mahemoff Jan 1 '13 at 2:12

You could use a Set in this case. It is optimized for this kind of operation (union, intersection, difference).

Make sure it applies to your case, once it allows no duplicates.

var a = new JS.Set([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]);
var b = new JS.Set([2,4,6,8]);

a.difference(b)
// -> Set{1,3,5,7,9}
share|improve this answer
2  
That looks like a nice library! What a shame that you can't download just the Set function without having to get everything else... –  Blixt Jul 27 '09 at 10:48
    
@Blixt I believe you can download it all, and just include just the set.js file –  Samuel Carrijo Jul 27 '09 at 10:52
    
Set is implemented in google closure as well. closure-library.googlecode.com/svn/docs/… –  Ben Flynn Feb 6 '12 at 19:08
    
this reminds me too much to Java :) –  d.raev Jul 17 '13 at 15:41

to subtract one array from another, simply use the snippet below:

var a1 = ['1','2','3','4','6'];
var a2 = ['3','4','5'];

var items = new Array();

items = jQuery.grep(a1,function (item) {
    return jQuery.inArray(item, a2) < 0;
});

It will returns ['1,'2','6'] that are items of first array which don't exist in the second.

Therefore, according to your problem sample, following code is the exact solution:

var array1 = ["test1", "test2","test3", "test4"];
var array2 = ["test1", "test2","test3","test4", "test5", "test6"];

var _array = new Array();

_array = jQuery.grep(array2, function (item) {
     return jQuery.inArray(item, array1) < 0;
});
share|improve this answer

A solution using indexOf() will be ok for small arrays but as they grow in length the performance of the algorithm approaches O(n^2). Here's a solution that will perform better for very large arrays by using objects as associative arrays to store the array entries as keys; it also eliminates duplicate entries automatically but only works with string values (or values which can be safely stored as strings):

function arrayDiff(a1, a2) {
  var o1={}, o2={}, diff=[], i, len, k;
  for (i=0, len=a1.length; i<len; i++) { o1[a1[i]] = true; }
  for (i=0, len=a2.length; i<len; i++) { o2[a2[i]] = true; }
  for (k in o1) { if (!(k in o2)) { diff.push(k); } }
  for (k in o2) { if (!(k in o1)) { diff.push(k); } }
  return diff;
}

var a1 = ['a', 'b'];
var a2 = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd'];
arrayDiff(a1, a2); // => ['c', 'd']
arrayDiff(a2, a1); // => ['c', 'd']
share|improve this answer
    
You want to use Object.hasOwnProperty() whenever you're doing a "for in" on an object. Otherwise you run the risk of looping through every field added to the prototype of the default Object. (Or just your object's parent) Also you only need two loops, one for a hash table creation, and the other looks up on that hash table. –  jholloman Sep 6 '12 at 18:16
    
@jholloman I respectfully disagree. Now that we can control enumerability for any property, presumably you should be including any property that you get during enumeration. –  Phrogz Jan 18 '13 at 20:20
    
@Phrogz A good point if you are only worried about modern browsers. Unfortunately I have to support back to IE7 at work so stone age is my default train of thought and we don't tend to use shims. –  jholloman Jan 19 '13 at 2:36

The above answer by Joshaven Potter is great. But it returns elements in array B that are not in array C, but not the other way around. For example, if var a=[1,2,3,4,5,6].diff( [3,4,5,7]); then it will output: ==> [1,2,6], but not [1,2,6,7], which is the actual difference between the two. You can still use Potter's code above but simply redo the comparison once backwards too:

Array.prototype.diff = function(a) {
    return this.filter(function(i) {return !(a.indexOf(i) > -1);});
};

////////////////////  
// Examples  
////////////////////

var a=[1,2,3,4,5,6].diff( [3,4,5,7]);
var b=[3,4,5,7].diff([1,2,3,4,5,6]);
var c=a.concat(b);
console.log(c);

This should output: [ 1, 2, 6, 7 ]

share|improve this answer

Using http://phrogz.net/JS/ArraySetMath.js you can:

var array1 = ["test1", "test2","test3", "test4"];
var array2 = ["test1", "test2","test3","test4", "test5", "test6"];

var array3 = array2.subtract( array1 );
// ["test5", "test6"]

var array4 = array1.exclusion( array2 );
// ["test5", "test6"]
share|improve this answer

Just thinking... for the sake of a challenge ;-) would this work... (for basic arrays of strings, numbers, etc.) no nested arrays

function diffArrays(arr1, arr2, returnUnion){
  var ret = [];
  var test = {};
  var bigArray, smallArray, key;
  if(arr1.length >= arr2.length){
    bigArray = arr1;
    smallArray = arr2;
  } else {
    bigArray = arr2;
    smallArray = arr1;
  }
  for(var i=0;i<bigArray.length;i++){
    key = bigArray[i];
    test[key] = true;
  }
  if(!returnUnion){
    //diffing
    for(var i=0;i<smallArray.length;i++){
      key = smallArray[i];
      if(!test[key]){
        test[key] = null;
      }
    }
  } else {
    //union
    for(var i=0;i<smallArray.length;i++){
      key = smallArray[i];
      if(!test[key]){
        test[key] = true;
      }
    }
  }
  for(var i in test){
    ret.push(i);
  }
  return ret;
}

array1 = "test1", "test2","test3", "test4", "test7"
array2 = "test1", "test2","test3","test4", "test5", "test6"
diffArray = diffArrays(array1, array2);
//returns ["test5","test6","test7"]

diffArray = diffArrays(array1, array2, true);
//returns ["test1", "test2","test3","test4", "test5", "test6","test7"]

Note the sorting will likely not be as noted above... but if desired, call .sort() on the array to sort it.

share|improve this answer

How about this:

Array.prototype.contains = function(needle){
  for (var i=0; i<this.length; i++)
    if (this[i] == needle) return true;

  return false;
} 

Array.prototype.diff = function(compare) {
    return this.filter(function(elem) {return !compare.contains(elem);})
}

var a = new Array(1,4,7, 9);
var b = new Array(4, 8, 7);
alert(a.diff(b));

So this way you can do array1.diff(array2) to get their difference (Horrible time complexity for the algorithm though - O(array1.length x array2.length) I believe)

share|improve this answer
    
Using the filter option is a great idea... however, you don't need to create a contains method for Array. I converted your idea into a one liner... Thanks for the inspiration! –  Joshaven Potter Oct 26 '10 at 18:39
    
This is wrong! The array filter method is a recent addition to JavaScript and is not supported by all browsers. –  Alin Purcaru May 10 '11 at 13:38
2  
The only browser that matters that doesn't support filter and indexOf is IE8. IE9 does support them both. So it's not wrong –  Bryan Larsen May 22 '11 at 17:39

I was looking for a simple answer that didn't involve using different libraries, and I came up with my own that I don't think has been mentioned here. I don't know how efficient it is or anything but it works;

    function find_diff(arr1, arr2) {
      diff = [];
      joined = arr1.concat(arr2);
      for( i = 0; i <= joined.length; i++ ) {
        current = joined[i];
        if( joined.indexOf(current) == joined.lastIndexOf(current) ) {
          diff.push(current);
        }
      }
      return diff;
    }

For my code I need duplicates taken out as well, but I guess that isn't always preferred.

I guess the main downside is it's potentially comparing many options that have already been rejected.

share|improve this answer

In response to the person who wanted to subtract one array from another...

If no more than say 1000 elements try this...

Setup a new variable to duplicate Array01 and call it Array03.

Now, use the bubble sort algorithm to compare the elements of Array01 with Array02 and whenever you find a match do the following to Array03...

 if (Array01[x]==Array02[y]) {Array03.splice(x,1);}

NB: We are modifying Array03 instead of Array01 so as not to screw up the nested loops of the bubble sort!

Finally, copy the contents of Array03 to Array01 with a simple assignment, and you're done.

share|improve this answer

littlebit fix for the best answer

function arr_diff(a1, a2)
{
  var a=[], diff=[];
  for(var i=0;i<a1.length;i++)
    a[a1[i]]=a1[i];
  for(var i=0;i<a2.length;i++)
    if(a[a2[i]]) delete a[a2[i]];
    else a[a2[i]]=a2[i];
  for(var k in a)
   diff.push(a[k]);
  return diff;
}

this will take current type of element in consideration. b/c when we make a[a1[i]] it converts a value to string from its oroginal value, so we lost actual value.

share|improve this answer

If not use hasOwnProperty then we have incorrect elements. For example:

[1,2,3].diff([1,2]); //Return ["3", "remove", "diff"] This is the wrong version

My version:

Array.prototype.diff = function(array2)
  {
    var a = [],
        diff = [],
        array1 = this || [];

    for (var i = 0; i < array1.length; i++) {
      a[array1[i]] = true;
    }
    for (var i = 0; i < array2.length; i++) {
      if (a[array2[i]]) {
        delete a[array2[i]];
      } else {
        a[array2[i]] = true;
      }
    }

    for (var k in a) {
      if (!a.hasOwnProperty(k)){
        continue;
      }
      diff.push(k);
    }

    return diff;
  }
share|improve this answer

I wanted a similar function which took in an old array and a new array and gave me an array of added items and an array of removed items, and I wanted it to be efficient (so no .contains!).

You can play with my proposed solution here: http://jsbin.com/osewu3/12.

Can anyone see any problems/improvements to that algorithm? Thanks!

Code listing:

function diff(o, n) {
  // deal with empty lists
  if (o == undefined) o = [];
  if (n == undefined) n = [];

  // sort both arrays (or this won't work)
  o.sort(); n.sort();

  // don't compare if either list is empty
  if (o.length == 0 || n.length == 0) return {added: n, removed: o};

  // declare temporary variables
  var op = 0; var np = 0;
  var a = []; var r = [];

  // compare arrays and add to add or remove lists
  while (op < o.length && np < n.length) {
      if (o[op] < n[np]) {
          // push to diff?
          r.push(o[op]);
          op++;
      }
      else if (o[op] > n[np]) {
          // push to diff?
          a.push(n[np]);
          np++;
      }
      else {
          op++;np++;
      }
  }

  // add remaining items
  if( np < n.length )
    a = a.concat(n.slice(np, n.length));
  if( op < o.length )
    r = r.concat(o.slice(op, o.length));

  return {added: a, removed: r}; 
}
share|improve this answer

Samuel: "For my code I need duplicates taken out as well, but I guess that isn't always preferred. I guess the main downside is it's potentially comparing many options that have already been rejected."

When comparing TWO lists, Arrays, etc, and the elements are less than 1000, the industry standard in the 3GL world is to use the bubble sort which avoids dupes.

The code would look something like this... (untested but it should work)

var Array01=new Array('A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K','L','M','N','O','P');
var Array02=new Array('X','B','F','W','Z','X','J','P','P','O','E','N','Q');
var Array03=Array01;

for(x=1; x<Array02.length; x++) {
 for(y=0; y<Array01.length-1; y++) {
  if (Array01[y]==Array02[x]) {Array03.splice(y,1);}}}

Array01=Array03;

To test the output...

for(y=0; y<Array01.length; y++) {document.write(Array01[y])}
share|improve this answer

There's a lot of problems with the answers I'm reading here that make them of limited value in practical programming applications.

First and foremost, you're going to want to have a way to control what it means for two items in the array to be "equal". The === comparison is not going to cut it if you're trying to figure out whether to update an array of objects based on an ID or something like that, which frankly is probably one of the most likely scenarios in which you will want a diff function. It also limits you to arrays of things that can be compared with the === operator, i.e. strings, ints, etc, and that's pretty much unacceptable for grown-ups.

Secondly, there are three state outcomes of a diff operation:

  1. elements that are in the first array but not in the second
  2. elements that are common to both arrays
  3. elements that are in the second array but not in the first

I think this means you need no less than 2 loops, but am open to dirty tricks if anybody knows a way to reduce it to one.

Here's something I cobbled together, and I want to stress that I ABSOLUTELY DO NOT CARE that it doesn't work in old versions of Microshaft browsers. If you work in an inferior coding environment like IE, it's up to you to modify it to work within the unsatisfactory limitations you're stuck with.

Array.defaultValueComparison = function(a, b) {
    return (a === b);
};

Array.prototype.diff = function(arr, fnCompare) {

    // validate params

    if (!(arr instanceof Array))
        arr = [arr];

    fnCompare = fnCompare || Array.defaultValueComparison;

    var original = this, exists, storage, 
        result = { common: [], removed: [], inserted: [] };

    original.forEach(function(existingItem) {

        // Finds common elements and elements that 
        // do not exist in the original array

        exists = arr.some(function(newItem) {
            return fnCompare(existingItem, newItem);
        });

        storage = (exists) ? result.common : result.removed;
        storage.push(existingItem);

    });

    arr.forEach(function(newItem) {

        exists = original.some(function(existingItem) {
            return fnCompare(existingItem, newItem);
        });

        if (!exists)
            result.inserted.push(newItem);

    });

    return result;

};
share|improve this answer

You can use underscore.js : http://underscorejs.org/#intersection

You have needed methods for array :

_.difference([1, 2, 3, 4, 5], [5, 2, 10]);
=> [1, 3, 4]

_.intersection([1, 2, 3], [101, 2, 1, 10], [2, 1]);
=> [1, 2]
share|improve this answer

I fall into this question, which was to get the difference of two simple arrays

var a1 = ['a', 'b'];
var a2 = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd'];

// need ["c", "d"]

and I don't see why not go with the basic for loops :

for(var i=0; i < a1.length; i++) {
  for(var j=0; j < a2.length; j++) {
    if(a1[i] == a2[j]) {
      a2.splice(j, 1);
    }
  }
}

which would return the needed ["c", "d"]

[edit] proposed right above, seen to late.

Anyway, any good reason to avoid this simple solution ?

share|improve this answer

Contributing with a jQuery solution that I'm currently using:

if (!Array.prototype.diff) {
    Array.prototype.diff = function (a) {
        return $.grep(this, function (i) { return $.inArray(i, a) === -1; });
    }; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
O(n^2) = terrible performance –  DotNetWise Oct 21 '13 at 11:00
2  
@DotNetWise This is the eqvivalent of Joshaven's answer above with jQuery methods. Did you downvote him as well? –  Johan Oct 21 '13 at 12:38
var result = [];
var arr1 = [1,2,3,4];
var arr2 = [2,3];
arr1.forEach(function(el, idx) {
    function unEqual(element, index, array) {
        var a = el;
        return (element!=a);
    }
    if (arr2.every(unEqual)) {
        result.push(el);
    };
});
alert(result);
share|improve this answer

This question is old but is still the top hit for javascript array subtraction so I wanted to add the solution I am using. This fits for the following case:

var a1 = [1,2,2,3]
var a2 = [1,2]
//result = [2,3]

The following method will produced the desired result:

function arrayDifference(minuend, subtrahend) {
  for (var i = 0; i < minuend.length; i++) {
    var j = subtrahend.indexOf(minuend[i])
    if (j != -1) {
      minuend.splice(i, 1);
      subtrahend.splice(j, 1);
    }
  }
  return minuend;
}

It should be noted that the function does not include values from the subtrahend that are not present in the minuend:

var a1 = [1,2,3]
var a2 = [2,3,4]
//result = [1]
share|improve this answer

This was inspired by the accepted answer by Thinker, but Thinker's answer seems to assume the arrays are sets. It falls apart if the arrays are [ "1", "2" ] and [ "1", "1", "2", "2" ]

The difference between those arrays is [ "1", "2" ]. The following solution is O(n*n), so not ideal, but if you have big arrays, it has memory advantages over Thinker's solution as well.

If you're dealing with sets in the first place, Thinker's solution is definitely better. If you have a newer version of Javascript with access to filters, you should use those as well. This is only for those who aren't dealing with sets and are using an older version of JavaScript (for whatever reason)...

if (!Array.prototype.diff) { 
    Array.prototype.diff = function (array) {
        // if the other array is a falsy value, return a copy of this array
        if ((!array) || (!Array.prototype.isPrototypeOf(array))) { 
            return this.slice(0);
        }

        var diff = [];
        var original = this.slice(0);

        for(var i=0; i < array.length; ++i) {
            var index = original.indexOf(array[i]);
            if (index > -1) { 
                original.splice(index, 1);
            } else { 
                diff.push(array[i]);
            }
        }

        for (var i=0; i < original.length; ++i) {
            diff.push(original[i]);
        }
        return diff;
    }
}   
share|improve this answer

Quick solution. Although it seems that others have already posted different variations of the same method. I am not sure this is the best for huge arrays, but it works for my arrays which won't be larger than 10 or 15.

Difference b - a

for(var i = 0; i < b.length; i++){
  for(var j = 0; j < a.length; j ++){
    var loc = b.indexOf(a[j]);
    if(loc > -1){
      b.splice(loc, 1);
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

just trimming the string to ensure.... spaces wont affect the dif

function arr_diff(a1, a2) { var a=[], diff=[]; for(var i=0;i

share|improve this answer
4  
Too much you trimmed :) –  Vajk Hermecz Mar 19 at 9:34

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