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My actual documents are more complex than this but simplifying them like so will explain the problem I want to solve. I have daily and weekly documents.

Daily Document: ObjectId, Type, Count, Date

Weekly Documents: ObjectId, Type, Count, StartDate, EndDate

If I wanted a daily report I can run a query that will select documents with Date field value between range X to Y and Type equal to 'daily'. I can do the same thing for Weekly reports and it all works.

The problem:

For weekly reports if the start date is not the first day of the week and the end date is not exactly the last day of the week, selecting documents with Type 'weekly' will produce inaccurate reports since weekly documents store the data for the entire week. This may seem strange but Google Analytics lets you do it:

enter image description here

In the above screenshot Jul 3rd isn't the beginning of that week, nor is Jul 17th the end of that week. But Google Analytics lets you see the data as you want.

Possible Solution:

One possible solution is to produce a daily report for the overflowing days and subtract it from the weekly report.

The question:

Is there a nicer solution to solving the problem I described? I'm open to redesigning the documents

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is it user input that drives this? if so why do you allow the user to pick dates in the middle of the week? if it is a weekly report wouldnt it make sense to allow selection of first day of week and last day of week?? –  c0deNinja Aug 9 '12 at 3:04
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Does not make any sense what you are asking. Using a range search you can find the documents for arbitrary date ranges. Setting or calculating the start and end date of the date range query is up to your application. What else do you need? –  Andreas Jung Aug 9 '12 at 3:34
    
Another solution would be to store (or compute) a "week number" (week of year and year probably) for each of the weekly documents. You can transform any date range criteria into week numbers, and query on that week number. But the cost in document size might outweigh any benefits, unless you are storing the week number only and not the 'start date' - 'end date' –  Andre de Frere Aug 9 '12 at 3:43
    
Well, if you look at Google analytics for instance, you will see that it lets you to select any date range and view a report in daily, weekly or monthly mode (take a look at the screenshot above). In other words why shouldn't have to select an entire week to see a weekly aggregate report if you don't want to. –  Roman Aug 9 '12 at 6:10
    
This is an application scope problem not a MongoDB one. –  Remon van Vliet Aug 9 '12 at 9:24

1 Answer 1

For weekly reports if the start date is not the first day of the week and the end date is not exactly the last day of the week, selecting documents with Type 'weekly' will produce inaccurate reports since weekly documents store the data for the entire week. This may seem strange but Google Analytics lets you do it:

Because they don't store documents like that.

The way this works (I reckon) is that Google just summerises the daily documents and ignores your "week" range and applies their own range of saying:

get as many full weeks as possible and aggregate the daily documents that come under that range

and then:

Just throw the others ontop making each the end and start point

I wouldn't try to mix week and daily documents here I would just query over daily documents only and aggregate client side.

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Firstly aggregating in client side for large data sets is a bad idea, that's what databases are for. Also as far as data schema design for analytics applications go you're suggestion will fall short pretty quickly when querying large enough range because processing it will take too long. –  Roman Aug 9 '12 at 23:49
    
@Arman Don't see what you mean. If you wanna take the load off you can calculate direct weeks within the area and then get the missing days and that would solve any problems. I actually have built statistics in MongoDB that can do stuff like Google Analytics and have tested it with 5K documents (days) for 10K imaginary users and I can (in about 5 secs) get back all those documents, thats about the same speed as GA so I am not sure where you are coming from. –  Sammaye Aug 10 '12 at 7:19

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