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To ensure that a formatted string returned by NSString initWithFormat:arguments: is as expected, I need to determine if there are the same number of format specifiers as arguments. Below is a (slightly contrived and highly edited) example:

- (void)thingsForStuff:(CustomStuff)stuff, ...
{
    NSString *format;
    switch (stuff)
    {
        case CustomStuffTwo:
            format = @"Two things: %@ and %@";
        break;

        case CustomStuffThree:
            format = @"Three things: %@, %@, and %@";
        break;

        default:
            format = @"Just one thing: %@";
        break;
    }

    va_list args;
    va_start(args, method);
    // Want to check if format has the same number of %@s as there are args, but not sure how
    NSString *formattedStuff = [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:format arguments:args];
    va_end(args);

    NSLog(@"Things: %@", formattedStuff);
}

Using this method, [self thingsForStuff:CustomStuffTwo, @"Hello", @"World"] would log

"Two things: Hello and World"

...but [self thingsForStuff:CustomStuffTwo, @"Hello"] would log

"Two things: Hello and "

...something that would be preferred to be caught before it happens.

Is there a way to count the format specifiers in a string, preferably something lightweight/inexpensive?

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Hey if you have a switch statement counting the args and building the specifiers then you already know how many specifiers there are. Please provide actual code. This code invalidates the question. –  deleted_user Aug 9 '12 at 1:28
    
Sorry if the code mislead - it was noted as being contrived and edited. My question was if there was a "way to count the format specifiers", and it appears there's an answer of "nope". –  Metric Scantlings Aug 9 '12 at 17:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Is there a way to count the format specifiers in a string, preferably something lightweight/inexpensive?

Nope -- really isn't. At least, not if you want it to work across all possible format strings. You would have to duplicate the parser that is used by stringWithFormat:. I.e. don't try to validate everything.

You could count the number of %, but that would not catch things like %% or other special cases. That may be good enough for your purposes.

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so catch them with a regex or something? I mean its not that much of a stretch. It is possible. Given that leg up its not hard find the rest of the problem. Should we really have to code the entire solution for people? –  deleted_user Aug 9 '12 at 1:16
    
seriously catching the escapes is not a big deal –  deleted_user Aug 9 '12 at 1:17
1  
The escapes aren't a big deal, but anything involving interpreting the arguments is. –  bbum Aug 9 '12 at 1:22
    
he just wanted to check the arg count vs specifier count. Full validation of arg types has no real point unless you want to rewrite printf. –  deleted_user Aug 9 '12 at 1:26
    
You'd be surprised at the number of people that think they want to go down the path of doing argument validation in the same fashion as the compiler (which isn't possible because of the use pattern in OP's code). –  bbum Aug 9 '12 at 2:29

Well, I created my own regex, I have no idea if it's going to catch all of them, and may end finding some false positives, but seems to be working for me:

static NSString *const kStringFromatSpecifiers =
@"%(?:\\d+\\$)?[+-]?(?:[lh]{0,2})(?:[qLztj])?(?:[ 0]|'.{1})?\\d*(?:\\.\\d+)?[@dDiuUxXoOfeEgGcCsSpaAFn]";

You can count the number of arguments using:

NSRegularExpression *regEx = [NSRegularExpression regularExpressionWithPattern:kStringFromatSpecifiers options:0 error:nil];
NSInteger numSpecifiers = [regEx numberOfMatchesInString:yourString options:0 range:NSMakeRange(0, yourString.length)];
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Because of the way C and Objective-C handle variadic functions/methods like yours, you cannot in general tell how many arguments the user has provided.

Here are two ways to handle your situation.

First, look for another way to do this. The number of arguments you pass to the method is determined at compile-time. So maybe instead of using a variadic method, you should just have three methods:

- (void)doStuff:(CustomStuff)stuff withThing:(Thing *)thing;
- (void)doStuff:(CustomStuff)stuff withThing:(Thing *)thing1 thing:(Thing *)thing2;
- (void)doStuff:(CustomStuff)stuff withThing:(Thing *)thing1 thing:(Thing *)thing2 hatWearer:(Cat *)cat;

And you select the right method to call at compile-time based on how many arguments you want to pass, eliminating the switch statement entirely.

Second, I see that your predefined format strings only use the %@ format. Does this mean that you expect the user to only pass objects to your method (aside from the (CustomStuff)stuff argument)?

If the user will only pass objects to your method, and you require those arguments to be non-nil, then you can get the compiler to help you out. Change your method to require the user to pass nil at the end of the argument list. You can tell the compiler that the argument list has to be nil-terminated by declaring the method (in your @interface) like this:

@interface MyObject : NSObject

- (void)thingsForStuff:(CustomStuff)stuff, ... NS_REQUIRES_NIL_TERMINATION

@end

Now the compiler will warn the user “Missing sentinel in method dispatch” if he calls your method without putting a literal nil at the end of the argument list.

So, having changed your API to require some non-nil arguments followed by a nil argument, you can change your method to count up the non-nil arguments like this:

- (void)thingsForStuff:(CustomStuff)stuff, ... {
    int argCount = 0;
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, stuff);
    while (va_arg(args, id)) {
        ++argCount;
    }
    va_end(args)

    int expectedArgCount;
    NSString *format;
    switch (stuff) {
        case CustomStuffTwo:
            expectedArgCount = 2;
            format = @"Two things: %@ and %@";
            break;

        case CustomStuffThree:
            expectedArgCount = 3;
            format = @"Three things: %@, %@, and %@";
            break;

        // etc.
    }

    NSAssert(argCount == expectedArgCount, @"%@ %s called with %d non-nil arguments, but I expected %d", self, (char*)_cmd, argCount, expectedArgCount);

    va_start(args, stuff);
    NSString *formattedStuff = [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:format arguments:args];
    va_end(args);

    NSLog(@"Things: %@", formattedString);
}
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I've considered such an approach, but my formats are unfortunately coming from another source (not so easy as my contrived example code). Sorry if my example mislead. –  Metric Scantlings Aug 9 '12 at 17:09

You could count the number of format specifiers, but IIRC you will never be able to count the number of arguments passed into a variable-argument method. This is because of the way C pushes arguments on the stack without specifying how many it has pushed.

Most functions overcome this by requiring that the last argument be nil or some kind of terminator (see [NSArray arrayWithObjects:]). There's even a macro that allows the compiler to check this and emit a warning at compile time.

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long specifierCount = [myFormatString componentsSeparatedByString:@"%"].count;

This will get you close. Its just a simple split. You would have to account for escaped % values.

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