Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to add my entire project directory to my github repo, but am unable to stage them (let along push them to the repo). This is what I have done so far.

cd masterfolder
git init
mkdir projectfolder
//add all my files + whatnot
git add projectfolder
git commit -m "this is my project"
git remote add origin https://github.com/myusername/myrepo.git
git push origin master

When I check my repo online, my files have not been committed.

I checked the status using git status -s and it turns out my files have not even been staged. Can someone point out what I'm doing wrong here?

UPDATE

I restarted my machine and checked git status again. It looks like my folder was staged, but when I try

git push origin master

I get

Everything up to date

My repo online does not contain any of the files though. Any thoughts?

UPDATE

After running git commit I get to a screen that lists all of the staged files but I cannot run any commands from here. Please help.

share|improve this question
1  
What is the output of git status? –  edhedges Aug 9 '12 at 2:15
    
Do you have a .gitignore file sitting anywhere? Before you commit but after you add, you should do 'git status -s' and that will show staged files. Once you commit you won't see them from that command. –  Roger Aug 9 '12 at 2:35
    
@edhedges-- please see the update above –  dopatraman Aug 9 '12 at 2:36
    
@Roger--I do not have a .gitignore file anywhere. When I do git status -s it shows my staged files, but after I push them to my repo I do not see the changes online. I described it in the update above –  dopatraman Aug 9 '12 at 2:37
    
After you've run git add projectfolder and git commit -m "message", what's the output of git log --oneline on the local repository? You should see the commit adding the files to the repository, which would indicate the issue is to do with pushing changes from local to github, and not with adding to the local repository. –  simont Aug 9 '12 at 3:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

git commit -m "this is my project"

I checked the status using git status -s and it turns out my files have not even been staged. Can someone point out what I'm doing wrong here?

The files were staged to the staging index, but then you committed them with git commit. This removes them from the staging index, and adds them to the repository in a commit.

As others have mentioned, you sound like you're getting an editor when you run git commit without -m. There are two probabilities:

  1. vi or vim. To check: when you get in (git commit), you won't be able to type anything. Press i, and down the bottom left it should say something like --INSERT--. The steps to write in vi or `vim:

    1. Press 'i' to get into "INSERT" mode.
    2. Write your commit message.
    3. Press "ESC" to get out of INSERT mode.
    4. Type: ':wq', including the full-colon. The 'w' means "write" (or "save"), the 'q' means "quit".
  2. nano. To check: down the bottom of the screen there's a bunch of things like "^G Get Help", "^O Write Out", etc. To use Nano: write a commit message, then press "^O" to save, "^X" to quit. (NOTE: The '^' symbol denotes a CTRL key. Press 'CTRL+O' when it says "^O", etc).

I restarted my machine and checked git status again. It looks like my folder was staged, but when I try: git push origin master...

You cannot git push changes from the staging index to a remote repository. The staging index is for building commits which you finalize and add to the repository using git commit. Look at the below picture [taken from http://git-scm.org], and read the Pro-Git book, which will give you a great understanding of how git works.

Git staging areas

This answer goes into a little more detail about the staging areas and git add, git commit etc.

share|improve this answer
    
great answer, this helped a lot. –  dopatraman Aug 14 '12 at 13:47

The screen you're getting into is probably a text-editor. If you're on unix/mac, it might be Vi(m).

Try to press i, and then enter some text. Then ESC and then :wq. It will write the commit message.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. I think it is the editor, too. In case your editor turns out to be nano instead, you can look at howtogeek.com/howto/42980/… for help in how to write your commit message and exit back to the terminal. –  grossvogel Aug 9 '12 at 18:15
    
That's what I thought also, until I saw that he wrote: //add all my files + whatnot –  Hiery Nomus Aug 9 '12 at 20:00

You can't commit an empty directory. You have to create a file inside projectfolder and then add it. If you don't want to add any new files, you can just place a .gitignore file:

touch projectfolder/.gitignore
git add projectfolder/.gitignore
git commit # Continue as before
share|improve this answer
    
See more here: stackoverflow.com/questions/115983/… –  Gingi Aug 9 '12 at 18:29
    
That's what I thought also, until I saw that he wrote: //add all my files + whatnot, so he added some files in the dir. –  Hiery Nomus Aug 9 '12 at 20:01
    
Whoops. I completely failed to notice that. Seemed at the time like a classic empty directory problem. –  Gingi Aug 9 '12 at 20:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.