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I want to use a cursor for retrieving the result from stored procedure. Please look following stored procedure.

CREATE PROCEDURE Test
@ID INT
AS 
BEGIN

        DECLARE @Name VARCHAR(400);
        DECLARE ACursor CURSOR FOR EXEC AStoredProcedure @ID

    OPEN ACursor;
    FETCH NEXT FROM ACursor INTO @Name;

        WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
        BEGIN
            PRINT @NAME
        END
    CLOSE ACursor;
    DEALLOCATE ACursor;

END

I have got the error with this. But I want to use like this. How can I do this?

PS. I can't INSERT EXEC statement for stored procedure. Because the stored procedure already use this statement and I don't want to make any changes for this stored procedure.

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2  
WHAT error are you getting? Please - we're not mindreaders, nor can we see your screen. You need to provide at least the necessary bits for us to be able to help you! –  marc_s Aug 9 '12 at 4:54
    
I can suggest you to change your approach, for tables with volumes of data in the range of 1,000,000.....this approach would be dangerous –  NG. Aug 9 '12 at 5:07

2 Answers 2

You need to specify a datatype for @ID Possibly @ID INT

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I am sorry for wrong code. I have changed it. Please check it. –  zanhtet Aug 9 '12 at 3:55
    
How about something like this... create a temp table with the results from the stored procedure and then create the cursor from the temp table. stackoverflow.com/questions/1296753/… –  Nathan Renico Aug 9 '12 at 4:09

You forgot to fetch next row inside the loop:

CREATE PROCEDURE Test
@ID INT
AS 
BEGIN

        DECLARE @Name VARCHAR(400);
        DECLARE ACursor CURSOR FOR EXEC AStoredProcedure @ID

    OPEN ACursor;
    FETCH NEXT FROM ACursor INTO @Name;

        WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
        BEGIN
            PRINT @NAME
            FETCH NEXT FROM ACursor INTO @Name;
        END
    CLOSE ACursor;
    DEALLOCATE ACursor;

END

This should be rewritten as:

    OPEN ACursor;
    WHILE 1 = 1
    BEGIN
        FETCH NEXT FROM ACursor INTO @Name;

        IF @@FETCH_STATUS <> 0
        BEGIN
            BREAK
        END
        PRINT @NAME
    END
    CLOSE ACursor;
    DEALLOCATE ACursor;

This way you only have one fetch in your code. Now it is not easy to forget about it, nor you have to append a column added to cursor query to each fetch separately.

Cursors are evil but sometimes necessary. To speed them up use fast_forward and static keywords, and use local so that an error in code does not leave open cursor behind.

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