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On my Mac OSX 10.74, I encountered this behavior that I am getting close to conclude it is a bug in the Mac OSX's Firewall software. Basically, after an application quit, the multicast UDP ports that were used during the session were not closed except one.

For the purpose of this demonstration, I set up two applications. One is called UDPSender, it just sends two messages to two multicast groups. The following snippet can be run from a Mac or from an iOS device. GCDAsyncUdpSocket is the latest version.

GCDAsyncUdpSocket *udpSocket1;
GCDAsyncUdpSocket *udpSocket2;
udpSocket1 = [[GCDAsyncUdpSocket alloc] initWithDelegate:self delegateQueue:dispatch_get_main_queue()];
udpSocket2 = [[GCDAsyncUdpSocket alloc] initWithDelegate:self delegateQueue:dispatch_get_main_queue()];
NSData *data = [@"A test message from socket1" dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
[udpSocket1 sendData:data toHost:@"239.1.1.110" port:46110 withTimeout:-1 tag:1];
data = [@"A test message from socket2" dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
[udpSocket2 sendData:data toHost:@"239.1.1.120" port:46120 withTimeout:-1 tag:1];

I created another application for the Mac called UDPReceiver. (This is the misbehaved one)

- (void)applicationDidFinishLaunching:(NSNotification *)aNotification
{
    // Insert code here to initialize your application
    GCDAsyncUdpSocket *udpSocket1;
    GCDAsyncUdpSocket *udpSocket2;
    udpSocket1 = [[GCDAsyncUdpSocket alloc] initWithDelegate:self delegateQueue:dispatch_get_main_queue()];
    udpSocket2 = [[GCDAsyncUdpSocket alloc] initWithDelegate:self delegateQueue:dispatch_get_main_queue()];
    NSError *error = nil;

    // udpSocket1
    if ([udpSocket1 bindToPort:46110 error:&error])
    {
        if (![udpSocket1 joinMulticastGroup:@"239.1.1.110" error:&error])
        {
            NSLog(@"udpSocket1 multicast failed to multicast group");
        }
        if (![udpSocket1 beginReceiving:&error])
        {
            [udpSocket1 close];
            NSLog(@"udpSocket1 rrror starting server (recv): %@", error);
        }
    } else  
    {
        NSLog(@"udpSocket1 rrror starting server (bind): %@", error);
        //        return;
    }

    // udpSocket2
    if ([udpSocket2 bindToPort:46120 error:&error])
    {
        if (![udpSocket2 joinMulticastGroup:@"239.1.1.120" error:&error])
        {
            NSLog(@"udpSocket2 multicast failed to multicast group");
        }
        if (![udpSocket2 beginReceiving:&error])
        {
            [udpSocket2 close];
            NSLog(@"udpSocket2 rrror starting server (recv): %@", error);
            return;
        }
    } else 
    {
        NSLog(@"udpSocket2 rrror starting server (bind): %@", error);
        //        return;
    }

}

- (void)udpSocket:(GCDAsyncUdpSocket *)sock didReceiveData:(NSData *)data
      fromAddress:(NSData *)address
withFilterContext:(id)filterContext
{
    NSString *msg = [[NSString alloc] initWithData:data encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
    NSLog(@"Receiving: %@", msg);
}

The test sequence like this: With your Mac's Firewall on. Start UDPReceiver, Start UDPSender. On the UDPReceiver machine, Mac's Firewall prompts for permission… select allow. The result is two correct logs statements:

2012-08-07 19:56:53.594 UDPReceiver[290:403] Receiving: A test message from socket1
2012-08-07 19:56:53.595 UDPReceiver[290:403] Receiving: A test message from socket2

Next, shutdown UDPReceiver, and re-open UDPReceiver again. Immediately, you will see this log.

2012-08-07 19:39:13.639 UDPReceiver[810:403] udpSocket1 rrror starting server (bind): Error Domain=NSPOSIXErrorDomain Code=48 "Address already in use" UserInfo=0x7fc7b3109d20 {NSLocalizedDescription=Address already in use, NSLocalizedFailureReason=Error in bind() function}

If you restart UDPSender at this moment, you will see the other log output:

2012-08-07 19:39:29.939 UDPReceiver[810:403] Receiving: A test message from socket2

I opened the Mac Terminal and used this command to see the active ports: netstat -anf inet. The first picture was the first time UDPReceiver was executed. The second picture was after UDPReceiver was closed.

I found out there are two ways to fix this:

  1. Restart my Mac. Then it will work correctly again. But the above symptom still persists.
  2. Turn off the firewall completely. This will eliminate the issue completely.

Has anyone encountered this phenomenon before? Any suggestion how to (programming) work around this?

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share|improve this question
    
You may want to ask this on Super User or Server Fault, where smarter sys admins hang out. Voting to migrate. –  Michael Dautermann Aug 9 '12 at 3:40
1  
This is both a system administration question and a programming question. I don't think it'll be a good idea to migrate this. Also, ipfw seems to be the name of the OSX firewall. –  Charles Aug 9 '12 at 5:51
    
@Charles was right. I am looking for a programming solution. So that my users do not have to restart their computers or turn off the firewall. –  user523234 Aug 9 '12 at 10:44

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