Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I use Celery to run web spiders which crawl some data, and after that I need to save this data somewhere in database (SQLite for example), but as I understand I can't share SQLAlchemy session between Celery workers. How do you solve this problem? Which way is common?

Currently I am trying to use Redis as a middle storage for data.

@celery.task
def run_spider(spider, task):
    # setup worker
    logger = logging.getLogger('Spider: %s' % spider.url)
    spider.meta.update({'logger': logger, 'task_id': int(task.id)})

    # push task data inside worker
    spider.meta.update({'task_request': run_spider.request})

    spider.run()

    task.state = "inactive"
    task.resolved = datetime.datetime.now()
    db.session.add(task)
    db.session.commit()

EDIT: Actually i was wrong, i don't need to share sessions, i need to create new database connection for each celery process/task.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I too have used redis for persistence in a large celery application.

It is common for my tasks to look like this:

@task
def MyTask(sink, *args, **kwargs):
    data_store = sharded_redis.ShardedRedis(sink)
    key_helper = helpers.KeyHelper()
    my_dictionary = do_work()
    data_store.hmset(key_helper.key_for_my_hash(), my_dictionary)
  • sharded_redis is just an abstraction of several redis shards handling sharding keys via the client.
  • sink is a list of (host, port) tuples that are used to make the appropriate connection after the shard is determined.

Essentially you are connecting and disconnecting from redis with each task (really cheap) rather than creating a connection pool.

Using a connection pool would work, but it you are going to really utilize celery (run a lot of concurrent tasks) then you would be better off (in my opinion) using this method since you run the risk of exhausting your connection pool, especially if you are doing anything that takes a bit longer in redis (like reading a large dataset into memory).

Connections to redis are pretty cheap, so this should scale well. We were handling several hundred thousand tasks per minute on a couple instances.

share|improve this answer
    
confirmed, Redis is near perfect. –  istinspring Aug 9 '12 at 20:10

Actually i was wrong, i don't need to share sessions, i need to create new database connection for each celery process/task.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.