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I'm learning python (with VBA background) by building a black-jack game (Yes, I've asked a bunch of questions using blackjack as an example).

Here's my code:

import random

class DECK():
    def load_deck(self):
        suite = ('Spades', 'Hearts', 'Diamonds', 'Clubs')
        rank = ('2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '10', "Jack", "Queen", "King", "Ace")
        full_deck = {}
        i = 0
        for s in suite:
            for r in rank:
                full_deck[i] = "%s of %s" % (r, s)
                i += 1
        return full_deck

    def pick_item(self, deck):   
        card_key = random.choice(deck.keys())  
        new_card = deck[card_key] 
        del deck[card_key]  
        return (deck, new_card)

    def missing_card(self, deck):
        temp_deck = DECK()
        print temp_deck

d1 = DECK()

deck1 = d1.load_deck()

deck1, card1 = d1.pick_item(deck1)

print card1

d1.missing_card(d1)

Here's what I get in the terminal (file namehand_c.py):

$ python hand_c.py
Ace of Clubs
<__main__.DECK instance at 0x10bb0d248>
$ 

Why does one function work pick_item, but not the other missing_card?

Per the first answer, I changed the function definition to:

    def missing_card(self, deck):
    deckC1 = DECK()
    temp_deck = deckC1.load_deck
    print temp_deck

But now I get the following from the terminal:

$ python hand_c.py
Jack of Diamonds
<bound method DECK.load_deck of <__main__.DECK instance at 0x10500e248>>
$ 
share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "work"? What do you expect missing_card to do? –  BrenBarn Aug 9 '12 at 5:02
    
In the near term, I was hoping it would print the dictionary. Ultimately, I want it to find missing cards. –  dwstein Aug 9 '12 at 5:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I modified your program to work. I introduced a constructor and changed the representation of your deck to a list instead of a dictionary, and made it to a instance variable that belongs to the deck you create in the line d1 = DECK(). Every method in your class now has access to your deck, without revealing your internal representation of the deck to the world and you only have to work with the one DECK object.

import random

class DECK():
    def __init__(self):
        suite = ('Spades', 'Hearts', 'Diamonds', 'Clubs')
        rank = ('2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '10', "Jack", "Queen", "King", "Ace")
        self.full_deck = []
        for s in suite:
            for r in rank:
                self.full_deck.append("%s of %s" % (r, s))

    def pick_item(self):
        card_key = random.randint(0, len(self.full_deck)-1)  
        new_card = self.full_deck[card_key] 
        del self.full_deck[card_key]  
        return new_card

    def missing_card(self):
        print self.full_deck

d1 = DECK()
card1 = d1.pick_item()

print card1

d1.missing_card()
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much for your answer and your effort! Much appreciated! If you have more time, can you tell me why you chose a list in stead of a dictionary? Also, can you provide some more detail on the error I was getting and why your solution fixes it? Thanks again. –  dwstein Aug 9 '12 at 5:25
    
I choose a list instead of a dictionary because thats the better datastructure to access an element by a integer in the range 0 to the length of the deck. Your initial dictionary has keys from 0 to 51 exactly as my list has and theres no need for the temporary i when building the deck. –  halex Aug 9 '12 at 5:29
    
Thanks very much! –  dwstein Aug 9 '12 at 5:36

You should go through the Python tutorial. Your code has many problems. Most basically, you are using the class just as a bag to hold functions, without actually holding the deck data as part of the class instance. That is, you return the deck as a dictionary, then pass it back in to another function. It would be better to store the deck in an attribute (e.g., self.deck) and then have other functions use that.

Anyway, the reason it doesn't print the dictionary is quite simple. You do this:

    temp_deck = DECK()
    print temp_deck

So you create a variable temp_deck and set it equal to a new instance of class DECK. Then you print it. Well, of course it won't print a dictionary. temp_deck is not a dictionary. It's a DECK object. If you want the dictionary with your current code, you would need to do temp_deck.load_deck() just like you did with your original deck, and then print the result of that.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much for your answer. I promise that I did go through the tutorial, but I guess I didn't pick it all up. –  dwstein Aug 9 '12 at 5:12

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