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I'm developing with Rails 2.3.8 and looking for a better way to build find conditions.

On search page, like user search, which user sets search conditions, find conditions are depends on the condition which user have chosen, e.g age, country, zip-code.

I've wrote code below to set multiple find conditions.

# Add condition if params post.
conditions_array = []
conditions_array << ['age > ?', params[:age_over]] if params[:age_over].present?
conditions_array << ['country = ?', params[:country]] if params[:country].present?
conditions_array << ['zip_code = ?', params[:zip_code]] if params[:zip_code].present?

# Build condition
i = 0
conditions = Array.new
columns = ''
conditions_array.each do |key, val|
  key = " AND #{key}" if i > 0
  columns += key
  item_master_conditions[i] = val
  i += 1
end
conditions.unshift(columns)
# condiitons => ['age > ? AND country = ? AND zip_code = ?', params[:age], params[country], prams[:zip_code]]

@users = User.find(:all, 
  :conditions => conditions
)

This code works fine but it is ugly and not smart. Is there better way to build find conditions?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I have accidentally run on your questions, and even it is old one, here is the answer:

After defining your conditions, you could use it like this:

# Add condition if params post.
conditions_array = []
conditions_array << ["age > #{params[:age_over]}"] if params[:age_over].present?
conditions_array << ["country = #{params[:country]}"] if params[:country].present?
conditions_array << ["zip_code = #{params[:zip_code]}"] if params[:zip_code].present?

conditions = conditions_array.join(" AND ")
@users = User.find(:all, :conditions => conditions) #Rails 2.3.8
@users = User.where(conditions) #Rails 3+
share|improve this answer
    
Rails 2.3.8 doesn't have .where. –  thomasfedb Jun 14 '13 at 8:26
    
Thanks for -1 . When you are so smart, why didn't you post your answer instead? I have updated answer for both versions. –  Aleks Jun 14 '13 at 9:23
    
While this is much more concise, it opens up the possibility of SQL injection. As it turns out, I found this thread because I'm trying to fix some code almost just like this. –  Alexander Clark Oct 30 '13 at 22:51
    
Yes, I have updated the answer to overcome that problem. thanks –  Aleks Oct 31 '13 at 9:21
    
Unfortunately this doesn't work either. Assuming params[:age_over] = 21 and params[:country] = "US" and params[:zip_code] = "90210", the resulting SQL statement is SELECT * FROM "users" WHERE (users.age > ? AND 21 AND users.country = ? AND US AND users.zip_code = ? AND 90210); which results in an ActiveRecord error. –  Alexander Clark Nov 1 '13 at 22:51

Named scopes could make it a bit more readable, albeit bulkier, while still preventing SQL injection.

named_scope :age_over, lambda { |age|
  if !age.blank?
    { :conditions => ['age > ?', age] }
  else
    {}
  end
}

named_scope :country, lambda { |country|
  if !country.blank?
    { :conditions => ['country = ?', age] }
  else
    {}
  end
}

named_scope :zip_code, lambda { |zip_code|
  if !zip_code.blank?
    { :conditions => ['zip_code = ?', age] }
  else
    {}
  end
}

And then when you do your search, you can simply chain them together:

@user = User.age_over(params[:age_over]).country(params[:country]).zip_code(params[:zip_code])
share|improve this answer
    
Did you know that in Rails if/else statements can be one-liners :o It is there, well, from the beginning of Ruby. Also what does else {} end do? Please don't make such beginner mistakes. Someone will learn the bad approach, just the way you did :/ –  Aleks Nov 2 '13 at 1:51

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