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So I have this relevant code...

public class PokemonTrainer {
    private Pokemon p = new Squirtle();
    private String name;

    public PokemonTrainer(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        PokemonTrainer pt = new PokemonTrainer("Ash");
        try {pt.fightGary();}

        catch (Charmander c) {
            System.out.println("You were roasted by a Charmander.");
        }

        catch (Squirtle s) {
            System.out.println("You were drowned by a Squirtle.");
        }

        catch (Bulbasaur b) {
            System.out.println("You were strangled by a Bulbasaur.");
        }

        catch (Pokemon p) {
            System.out.println("You survived!");
        }
    }

    public void fightGary() throws Pokemon {
        throw p;
    }

public class Pokemon extends Exception {}
public class Bulbasaur extends Pokemon {}
public class Squirtle extends Pokemon {}
public class Charmander extends Pokemon {}

Why is it that this prints "You were drowned by a Squirtle"?

In my reasoning, "catch" is a method, and when an object is passed into a method, the method evaluates based on the object's STATIC TYPE -- that is, "Pokemon", in this case -- this is demonstrated in the below short example:

public class PokemonTrainer {
    private Pokemon p = new Squirtle();
    private String name;

    public PokemonTrainer(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        PokemonTrainer pt = new PokemonTrainer("Ash");
        pt.fightGary(pt.p); // ------------ Prints "Pokemon!!!"
    }

    public void fightGary(Pokemon p) {
        System.out.println("Pokemon!!!");
    }

    public void fightGary(Squirtle s) {
        System.out.println("Squirtle!!!");
    }
}

So what's different about these two examples? Why does the first example print what it does?

Thanks!

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6  
this is 1000% NOT what the try/catch/finally construct is to be used for! They are called exceptions for a reason! "…In my reasoning, "catch" is a method…" well your reasoning is wrong. –  Jarrod Roberson Aug 9 '12 at 7:37
1  
A rather poor attempt at Pokemon Exception Handling –  Lie Ryan Aug 9 '12 at 7:40
    
While Jarrod is right, even if a little over zealous, I believe your expectations are right. The first matching handler should be called. It works for me. What JVM and version are you using? –  TedTrippin Aug 9 '12 at 7:42
1  
@TedTrippin: No, the expectations are not correct. Which catch block is executed is determined by the execution time type of the thrown exception. –  Jon Skeet Aug 9 '12 at 7:45
    
Well it's was simply a problem on a past exam that I'm studying for a final; I'm sorry that the author of the exam decided to poke a little fun with the "catch" keyword, I guess. And I'm sorry my "reasoning" was wrong, I haven't been programming for too long. No need for all of that energy, though, it's completely unnecessary. But thanks, I understand now. –  Ryan Yu Aug 9 '12 at 7:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In my reasoning, "catch" is a method

That's the first mistake. catch isn't a method, and trying to think of it as if it were is going to cause you problems.

It's a language construct with its own rules. You should read the language specification section 14.20 or the exceptions tutorial for more information.

In short, when you have a sequence of catch blocks, the first one which matches the execution time type of the thrown exception is executed. (The compiler will prevent you from catching a more-general exception before a more-specific one.)

So if you have:

try {
  doSomething();
} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
  ...
} catch (IOException e) {
  ...
}

then if doSomething() throws a FileNotFoundException it will execute the first catch block (and only that one) - whereas if it throws any other kinds of IOException, it will execute the second catch block. Any other exceptions will propagate up the stack.

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Well, catch isn't a method but a part of the Java language.

But to answer your question, p is an instance of Squirtle:

Pokemon p = new Squirtle();

And since there is a catch clause to catch a Squirtle, it does exactly that.

catch (Squirtle s)

If this line wouldn't exist, the more general

catch (Pokemon p)

would handle the thrown Squirtle.

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While Pokemon p is declared as a Pokemon, it is instantiated as a Squirtle with new Squirtle(). Because it is internally a Squirtle, getClass(), when called on it, will return Squirtle.class, so the try-catch catches the Squirtle catch before the Pokemon catch is even checked.

This is called polymorphism.

In regards to your reasoning, catch is not a method, and rather is a statement which goes with a try block to declare what to do in the case of certain exceptions being thrown.

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You are confusing the type of the reference with the type of the object.

Catch is more like a switch on the instanceof object.

Consider a simpler example

String s = "hello";
Object o = s;

In this case the reference type for o is Object but the objects type is a String for both s and o as they are the same object.

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