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I have been given few coordinate points :

  1. source (0,0)

  2. destination (m,n)

  3. a set of coordinate points S = {(x,y) such that 0 < x < m and 0 < y < n}

Objective is to find out the number of shortest paths between (0,0) and (m,n) such that any point in the set S is never encountered in these paths. How do i find it?

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Is this some kind of homework or study assignement? –  user647772 Aug 9 '12 at 8:09
    
I would try a simple A* (A-star) algorithm (policyalmanac.org/games/aStarTutorial.htm), and beginning by removing the S points from the open set –  Rolle Aug 9 '12 at 8:09
    
Is the plain discrete or continuous? –  user647772 Aug 9 '12 at 8:12
    
@Tichodroma ah I just assumed discrete due to the integers in source –  Rolle Aug 9 '12 at 8:18
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6 Answers

Here you have a solution in C# but can converted easily to Java. Hopefully you will find it useful.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Drawing;

namespace Game
{
    class Program
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Find a matrix with all possible optimum paths from point A to point B
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="rows">Rows of the matrix</param>
        /// <param name="cols">Cols of the matrix</param>
        /// <param name="points">Obstacles location</param>
        /// <param name="moves">Allowed moves</param>
        /// <param name="matrix">Resulting matrix</param>
        /// <param name="A">Starting point</param>
        /// <param name="B">Ending point</param>
        private static void FindMatrix(int rows, int cols, List<Point> points, List<Point> moves, out List<List<int>> matrix, out Point A, out Point B)
        {
            matrix = new List<List<int>>();
            A = new Point(-1, -1);
            B = new Point(-1, -1);
            //Init values of the matrix
            for (int row = 0; row <= rows; row++)
            {
                matrix.Add(new List<int>());
                for (int col = 0; col <= cols; col++)
                    matrix[matrix.Count - 1].Add(0);
            }
            var index = 0;
            while ((index < points.Count) && (points[index].Y >= 0) && (points[index].Y <= rows) && (points[index].X >= 0) && (points[index].X <= cols))
            {
                matrix[points[index].Y][points[index].X] = -1;
                index++;
            }
            if ((index == points.Count) && (matrix[0][0] == 0) && (matrix[rows][cols] == 0))
            {
                A.X = 0;
                A.Y = 0;
                B.X = cols;
                B.Y = rows;
            }
            if ((A.X >= 0) && (A.Y >= 0) && (B.X >= 0) && (B.Y >= 0)) //To check if points A and B exist in the board
            {
                var pairs = new List<Point>[2] { new List<Point>(), new List<Point>() };
                int level = 0;
                index = 0;
                pairs[index].Add(A);
                while ((pairs[index].Count > 0) && (pairs[index][pairs[index].Count - 1] != B))
                {
                    pairs[Math.Abs(1 - index)].Clear();
                    level++;
                    foreach (var pair in pairs[index])
                        foreach (var move in moves) //Test all possible moves
                            if ((pair.Y + move.Y >= 0) && (pair.Y + move.Y < matrix.Count) && (pair.X + move.X >= 0) && (pair.X + move.X < matrix[pair.Y + move.Y].Count) && (matrix[pair.Y + move.Y][pair.X + move.X] == 0)) //Inside the boundaries? Not visited before?
                            {
                                pairs[Math.Abs(1 - index)].Add(new Point(pair.X + move.X, pair.Y + move.Y));
                                matrix[pair.Y + move.Y][pair.X + move.X] = level;
                            }
                    index = Math.Abs(1 - index);
                }
                matrix[A.Y][A.X] = 0;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Finds all possible optimum paths from point A to point B in a matix with obstacles
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="matrix">Matrix with obstacles</param>
        /// <param name="moves">Allowed moves</param>
        /// <param name="A">Starting point</param>
        /// <param name="B">Ending point</param>
        /// <param name="result">Resulting optimum paths</param>
        /// <param name="list">Temporary single optimum path</param>
        private static void WalkMatrix(List<List<int>> matrix, List<Point> moves, Point A, Point B, ref List<List<Point>> result, ref List<Point> list)
        {
            if ((list.Count > 0) && (list[list.Count - 1] == B)) //Stop condition
            {
                result.Add(new List<Point>(list));
            }
            else
            {
                foreach (var move in moves)
                    if ((A.Y + move.Y >= 0) && (A.Y + move.Y < matrix.Count) && (A.X + move.X >= 0) && (A.X + move.X < matrix[A.Y + move.Y].Count) && (matrix[A.Y + move.Y][A.X + move.X] == matrix[A.Y][A.X] + 1)) //Inside the boundaries? Next step?
                    {
                        list.Add(new Point(A.X + move.X, A.Y + move.Y)); //Store temporary cell
                        WalkMatrix(matrix, moves, list[list.Count - 1], B, ref result, ref list);
                        list.RemoveAt(list.Count - 1); //Clean temporary cell
                    }
            }
        }

        public static List<List<Point>> FindPaths(int rows, int cols, List<Point> points)
        {
            var result = new List<List<Point>>();
            var moves = new List<Point> { new Point(1, 0), new Point(0, 1), new Point(-1, 0), new Point(0, -1) }; //Right, Down, Left, Up (clockwise)
            List<List<int>> matrix; //Matrix temporary representation to store all possible optimum paths
            Point A; //Starting point
            Point B; //Ending point
            FindMatrix(rows, cols, points, moves, out matrix, out A, out B);
            if ((A.X >= 0) && (A.Y >= 0) && (B.X >= 0) && (B.Y >= 0)) //To check if points A and B exist
            {
                List<Point> list = new List<Point>();
                list.Add(A);
                WalkMatrix(matrix, moves, A, B, ref result, ref list);
            }
            return result;
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var points = new List<Point>
            {
                new Point(3, 2),
                new Point(4, 2),
                new Point(5, 2),
                new Point(3, 3),
                new Point(4, 3),
                new Point(5, 3),
                new Point(3, 4),
                new Point(4, 4),
                new Point(5, 4)
            };
            List<List<Point>> paths = FindPaths(5, 10, points); //path.Count store the quantity of optimum paths
        }
    }
}
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It would be convenient if you could just state your algorithm rather than the code itself,I just need the idea,I can implement it in java. –  djscribbles Aug 9 '12 at 10:04
    
@djscribbles The basic idea is to construct a matrix where any of its cells represents the minimum steps needed from the starting point until that particular cell ending in the desired goal (of course obstacles can not be accessed so the number stored in their cells are -1). Once this matrix is constructed we can traverse the matrix looking in any allowed direction for a surrounding cell with value greater exactly in one unit regarding to the value in the point. If we made this process backtracking we can obtain all minimum paths. Sorry if I made the solution more general than you specify. –  rsotolongo Aug 9 '12 at 10:57
    
if i remove some nodes then the shortest path length also changes..like suppose I have two points are (0,0) and (7,1) and the obstacle points are (1,0) and ( 4,1). Previously without any obstacle points the shortest distance in the graph between (0,0) and(7,1) was (7+1) = 8 .but after introducing the obstacle the shortest distance becomes 10 and the number of shortest paths are reduced to 6 from 8.does this take care of that case.This is an exception case actually because here the rectangle (0,0) to (7,1) has a breadth of 1 and the obstacle points are on both of its length boundaries. –  djscribbles Aug 9 '12 at 11:02
    
nice. too bad I don't have C# right now so can't quickly run this. @rsotolongo could you please run it on the m,n, s in my answer and see that we get the same answer? –  robert king Aug 9 '12 at 11:30
    
@djscribbles Sure, here you have the first solution (without obstacles), just follow the numbers in order from (0, 0) until (7, 1). 8 <- number of optimum paths 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 8 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 7 8 0 1 2 3 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 6 7 8 0 1 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 5 6 7 8 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 4 5 6 7 8 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 –  rsotolongo Aug 9 '12 at 11:55
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This can be solved using dynamic programming.

First, find the distance-to-origin of every node using a breadth-first search.

Then the number of shortest paths F that go through a point (x,y) with distance-to-origin d is just the sum of F(x1,y1) for all (x1, y1) neighboring (x,y) with distance d-1.

In other words, F(x,y) = Sum F(all neighboring points with distance-to-origin of d-1)

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I think this is a complete solution, but you might want to test it and convert it to java.

The basic idea is to bread first search the grid. At each point in the grid, the number of ways of getting to that point is equal to the number of ways of getting next to that point in a distance one less.

n, m = 10, 15 #10 by 15 grid say

s = set([(1, 1), (2, 2), (9, 14)])

grid = []
ways = []
for i in range(n + 1):
    grid.append([None]*(m + 1))
    ways.append([0]*(m + 1))

start = (0, 0)
end = (n, m)

grid[0][0] = 0
ways[0][0] = 1

fringe = [start]
distance = 0
new_fringe = []
while True:
    for node in new_fringe:
        i, j = node
        deltas = [(-1, 0), (1, 0), (0, 1), (0, -1)] #directions to travel
        for di, dj in deltas:
            i2, j2 = i + di, j + dj
            if 0 <= i2 <= n and 0 <= j2 <= m and grid[i2][j2] == distance - 1:
                ways[i][j] += ways[i2][j2]

    new_fringe = []
    for node in fringe:
        i, j = node
        deltas = [(-1, 0), (1, 0), (0, 1), (0, -1)] #directions to travel
        for di, dj in deltas:
            i2, j2 = i + di, j + dj
            if 0 <= i2 <= n and 0 <= j2 <= m and (i2, j2) not in s and grid[i2][j2] is None:
                grid[i2][j2] = distance + 1
                new_fringe.append((i2, j2))
    if not new_fringe: #no new nodes
        break
    fringe = new_fringe
    distance += 1

for row in grid:
    print row
"""[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15],
    [1, None, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16],
    [2, 3, None, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17],
    [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18],
    [4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19],
    [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20],
    [6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21],
    [7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22],
    [8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23],
    [9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, None, 24],
    [10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25]]"""

for row in ways:
    print row

"""[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]
[1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14]
[1, 1, 0, 2, 5, 9, 14, 20, 27, 35, 44, 54, 65, 77, 90, 104]
[1, 2, 2, 4, 9, 18, 32, 52, 79, 114, 158, 212, 277, 354, 444, 548]
[1, 3, 5, 9, 18, 36, 68, 120, 199, 313, 471, 683, 960, 1314, 1758, 2306]
[1, 4, 9, 18, 36, 72, 140, 260, 459, 772, 1243, 1926, 2886, 4200, 5958, 8264]
[1, 5, 14, 32, 68, 140, 280, 540, 999, 1771, 3014, 4940, 7826, 12026, 17984, 26248]
[1, 6, 20, 52, 120, 260, 540, 1080, 2079, 3850, 6864, 11804, 19630, 31656, 49640, 75888]
[1, 7, 27, 79, 199, 459, 999, 2079, 4158, 8008, 14872, 26676, 46306, 77962, 127602, 203490]
[1, 8, 35, 114, 313, 772, 1771, 3850, 8008, 16016, 30888, 57564, 103870, 181832, 0, 203490]
[1, 9, 44, 158, 471, 1243, 3014, 6864, 14872, 30888, 61776, 119340, 223210, 405042, 405042, 608532]"""
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I assume that you are talking about a grid of points defined in (x,y). And that between the two points where you want to calculate the set of shortest paths are a one of more obstacle(s)

So lets cut down the problem into two 1- Find a group of shortest paths from Point A to B 2- Make sure that on each path of these, none of the points belong to S are on the path

To solve this problem, there are many algorithms out there, the first one I'd think of is reinforcement learning This is a visual example to it in this link You can either use this library or implement it yourself. its fairly easy

Both algorithms could be implemented for a grid, where you mark some points as obstacles, i.e. your set of points S, and while detecting paths the points of set S will avoided.

Hope this helps

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It can trivially be reduced to a graph problem if only integer coordinates is allowed.

This is how it is done in probably every game. The graph looks like a rectangle, source in one corner, destination in the opposite, and nodes are connected by vertical or horizontal edges. (Some nodes have been removed, the set S).

Now, shortest paths here are a subset of the Dyck-paths between the corners, so the Catalan numbers are an upper bound. http://mathworld.wolfram.com/DyckPath.html

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I dont need an upper bound!! the problem is if i remove some nodes then the shortest path distance also changes..like suppose I have two points are (0,0) and (7,1) and the obstacle points are (1,0) and ( 4,1).Previously without any obstacle points the shortest distance in the graph was (7+1) = 8 .but after introducing the obstacle the shortest distance becomes 10 and the number of shortest paths are reduced to 6 from 8 –  djscribbles Aug 9 '12 at 9:47
    
Yes, that info was just for bonus. But a dynamic programming approach should work great here. This is very similar to traversing a maze, so search for maze traversing algorithms. Btw, WHY do you need the number of shortest paths. –  Paxinum Aug 9 '12 at 12:50
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try to look at Dijkstra's algorithm: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dijkstra%27s%5Falgorithm

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Dijkstra's algorithm is about paths in graphs. –  user647772 Aug 9 '12 at 8:10
    
@Tichodroma the question is to find "Number of shortest paths between two coordinate points in a graph with constraints" - Dijkstra's Algo is a graph search algorithm that solves the single-source shortest path problem for a graph. –  Vivek Aug 9 '12 at 8:14
1  
well the user has no graph to start with. so I agree that Dijkstra is not applicable here –  Moataz Elmasry Aug 9 '12 at 8:16
    
It can trivially be reduced to a graph problem if only integer coordinates is allowed. This is how it is done in probably every game. –  Paxinum Aug 9 '12 at 8:22
    
@Paxinum: Every game? How many games are interested in the number of shortest paths along integer coordinates? –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Aug 9 '12 at 8:49
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