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i wanna write a small (5-6 table) desktop app in java.I wanna use Firebird 2.1. database.But i googled and see HSQLDB.I wanna make a decision between firebird and hsqldb :)

So which database i have to use ?

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Why have you narrowed it down to those two? Have you looked at Oracle, or MySQL? –  jjnguy Jul 27 '09 at 12:47
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+h2database.com –  lutz Jul 27 '09 at 12:47
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I would go with Apache Derby. It is actually very well crafted, can be transactional if needed (although never tried), being written in Java is additional plus. Problems I've found it will not 'give back' taken disk space when you delete data in tables, once I was not able to fix one index.. –  ante.sabo Jul 27 '09 at 13:17
    
+1 for Derby / Java DB, it is included in the Java SE Development Kit. –  mjn Dec 6 '09 at 17:49
    
hsqldb's own claim on their site: its much more std sql compliant. has to be true. –  nawfal Feb 21 '13 at 22:25
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For a desktop application an embedded database should be enough. hsqldb or h2 are very well suited for this. You just have to add the JAR file to you applications classpath. Firebird looks more complex.

Actually, H2 is more advanced than hsqldb.

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That list has been proven quite biased a couple of times (I'm following the various mailing lists of Derby, H2, HSQLDB). And it hides some facts, such as H2's missing support for typed arrays, missing support for a PL/SQL-like stored procedure language, incomplete information_schema implementation, less standards-compliant, etc. So "more advanced" might not hold true (anymore) –  Lukas Eder Jun 17 '11 at 7:28
    
Be aware: H2 does not provide a stored procedure language but instead lets you do that in Java/JDBC. It will be much more work to write JDBC than it is to write a stored procedure. Also, the JDBC in H2 is not type and dependance checked like Firebird's stored procedure language so errors may not show until you run into them; your not prevented from deleting something where there is a dependency in a stored procedure. –  jcalfee314 Aug 5 '13 at 19:30
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Firebird runs in a process of its own and your java app needs to communicate with it. The advantage HSQLDB has that it is written in java, and can run in the same process, which simplifies your installation and runtime check ups (Is the db running, connection errors, etc.). It can persist the data to the disk as well. AN additional option is the H2 database db, which also can run in process.

I'd go with the HSQLDB or H2.

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I think H2 is the successor to HSQLDB, original author's second pure java database ... appears to have way more features –  basszero Jul 27 '09 at 13:02
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Firebird Embedded runs in the same process too. With the advantage that if you need to scale the database later you can simply move it to a server. –  Douglas Tosi Jul 28 '09 at 11:35
    
Can Firebird Embedded run embedded in a Java application so that it runs in the java.exe process? AFAIK this is not the case. –  mjn Dec 6 '09 at 17:45
    
@mjustin - no, it is run in a separate process –  David Rabinowitz Dec 7 '09 at 6:08
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I recomend HSQLDB because it's implemented in Java (so you have the same platform as the application) and I guess that you don't need any of the feature for the project of that size that could FireBird provide.

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Don't forget that Java 6 comes with JavaDB, and that may be a useful implementation for a first solution. It's a repackaged Apache Derby, and consequently quite powerful.

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It is optional in the installation. –  David Rabinowitz Jul 27 '09 at 12:51
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Firebird is very good embedded database and just win an award at SouceForge this year

SQLite have good press for embedded Database too.

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