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I'm not sure if bitmask is the correct term. Let me explain:

In php, the error_reporting function can be called multiple ways:

// Report simple running errors
error_reporting(E_ERROR | E_WARNING | E_PARSE);

// Reporting E_NOTICE can be good too (to report uninitialized
// variables or catch variable name misspellings ...)
error_reporting(E_ERROR | E_WARNING | E_PARSE | E_NOTICE);

// Report all errors except E_NOTICE
// This is the default value set in php.ini
error_reporting(E_ALL ^ E_NOTICE);

I got the term bitmask from the php.net page here

Anyway the point of this is, I have implemented a SIMPLE method called ls which returns the contents of a directory.

This function takes 3 args... ( $include_hidden = false, $return_absolute = false, $ext = false )

So when i call the function, i set how i want the results. Whether i want the results to return hidden directories, whether i want basenames only etc.

so when i call the function i'm writing

ls(true, false, true)
ls(false, false, true)
ls(true, true, true)
etc...

I thought it would be much more readable if i could just flag how i want the data returned?

so something like:

ls( INCLUDE_HIDDEN | HIDE_EXTS );
ls( SHOW_ABSOLUTE_PATHS | HIDE_EXTS );

etc...

How would i implement this in terms of testing which flags have been called?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 50 down vote accepted

It's quite simple actually. First a bit of code to demonstrate how it can be implemented. If you don't understand anything about what this code is doing or how it works, feel free to ask additional questions in the comments:

const FLAG_1 = 0b0001; // 1
const FLAG_2 = 0b0010; // 2
const FLAG_3 = 0b0100; // 4
const FLAG_4 = 0b1000; // 8
// Can you see the pattern? ;-)

function show_flags ($flags) {
  if ($flags & FLAG_1) {
    echo "You passed flag 1!<br>\n";
  }
  if ($flags & FLAG_2) {
    echo "You passed flag 2!<br>\n";
  }
  if ($flags & FLAG_3) {
    echo "You passed flag 3!<br>\n";
  }
  if ($flags & FLAG_4) {
    echo "You passed flag 4!<br>\n";
  }
}

show_flags(FLAG_1 | FLAG_3);

Demo


Because the flags are integers, on a 32-bit platform you define up to 32 flags. On a 64-bit platform, it's 64. It is also possible to define the flags as strings, in which case the number of available flags is more or less infinite (within the bounds of system resources, of course). Here's how it works in binary (cut down to 8-bit integers for simplicity).

FLAG_1
Dec:    1
Binary: 00000001

FLAG_2
Dec:    2
Binary: 00000010

FLAG_3
Dec:    4
Binary: 00000100

// And so on...

When you combine the flags to pass them to the function, you OR them together. Let's take a look at what happens when we pass FLAG_1 | FLAG_3

  00000001
| 00000100
= 00000101

And when you want to see which flags were set, you AND the bitmask with the flag. So, lets take the result above and see if FLAG_3 was set:

  00000101
& 00000100
= 00000100

...we get the value of the flag back, a non-zero integer - but if we see if FLAG_2 was set:

  00000101
& 00000010
= 00000000

...we get zero. This means that you can simply evaluate the result of the AND operation as a boolean when checking if the value was passed.

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1  
So basic bitwise operations are: $flags & FLAG_1 - check if FLAG_1 is set, $flags | FLAG_1 - set FLAG_1, $flags & ~FLAG_1 - unset FLAG_1, ~$flags - invert flags –  Konstantin Pereyaslov Nov 1 '13 at 16:53
1  
I don't know PHP and will likely never learn it, but I'm glad I stumbled upon this question - your explanation can help anyone implement bit-mapping in any language :) –  Chris Cirefice Dec 3 '13 at 4:29
1  
I would recommend defining the power 2 decimals as bit wise shift operation of 1. define('FLAG_1', 1<<0); define('FLAG_2', 1<<2); define('FLAG_3', 1<<3); define('FLAG_4', 1<<4); This is how it's usually done in C –  AmitP Jan 6 '14 at 16:12
2  
@AmitP There are a couple of (minor) issues with this approach in PHP. 1) currently the const keyword does not support expressions, even if the result is constant (i.e. const FLAG_1 = 1 << 0; is a parse error) - obviously this is not an issue with define() 2) in C a constant expression like const int FLAG_1 = 1 << 0; will be resolved at compile time, and the actual compiled value will be the result of the expression, whereas in PHP this is evaluated every time, a microscopic performance hit. Neither of these issues are good reasons to avoid the more readable version you suggest though. –  DaveRandom Jan 6 '14 at 17:32
define( "INCLUDE_HIDDEN", 0x1 );
define( "HIDE_EXTS", 0x2 );
define( "SHOW_ABSOLUTE_PATHS", 0x4 );
//And so on, 0x8, 0x10, 0x20, 0x40, 0x80, 0x100, 0x200, 0x400, 0x800 etc..

You can then check for individual flags in your ls function:

if( $flags & INCLUDE_HIDDEN ) { //<-- note just a single &, bitwise and
    //$flags have INCLUDE_HIDDEN
}
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1  
Do you know of an advantage to using hex numbers instead of integers? Just curious:) –  AlexMorley-Finch Sep 16 '14 at 14:21

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