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Our code has versioning information hardcoded in printf in at least 20 different files like: printf("Software version v11.2"); This means changing 20 files everytime there is an update.

Instead i wish to use a macro and #include it in a common.h file, such that version update is just changing one macro, that's all.

I tried something like:

#include <stdio.h>
#define VERSION "v11.2"
int main()
{
  printf("Trying to print macro: ", VERSION);
}

But this style of "string""string" works in Java not in C. Any ideas how to accomplish it?

We will use the gcc for compilation.

NOTE: The macro is also used in some typical *.rc files, where we can't use a variable, and somewhere these rc files are parsed using SQL query. So we can't use variables like char ver[]="v11.2"

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4  
You can use puts("Software version" VERSION);, where a string concatenation will occur between string literals. I can't think of any case where puts is dangerous with the usage above, while someone crazy can go and put format string into VERSION macro and mess the thing up with printf. –  nhahtdh Aug 9 '12 at 9:34
    
you could encapsulate the whole printf in a function to make it even more DRY, i.e. print_version() in case you version info gets more complex at a later date –  bph Aug 9 '12 at 9:41
    
"string" "string" works fine in C ... that's where Java got it. But you put a comma between the strings. –  Jim Balter Aug 9 '12 at 10:11
    
Its C basic question on printf. Please go through the man page of printf and do some hands on before you ask here. Thanks for understanding. –  Viswesn Aug 9 '12 at 12:23
    
@Viswesn: Yes it's too basic, but still did you notice how many people gave a wrong answer? By the way..FYI..downvoting others's questions leads to loss of one's own reputation point too. Did you know that? Might be not, seems like you are new in this forum. –  kingsmasher1 Aug 10 '12 at 7:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Here are two possible solutions.

#include <stdio.h>
#define VERSION "v11.2"
int main()
{
  // Let printf insert the string when doing the output.
  printf("Trying to print macro: %s\n", VERSION);
  // Let the compiler concatenate the strings.
  puts("Trying to print macro: " VERSION);
  // Let the compiler concatenate the strings, can be assigned to a variable.
  const char buf[] = "Trying to print macro: " VERSION;
  puts(buf);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I thought to use a variable, but we can't because many of the files are *.rc file, where they only use a macro. And some are C or CPP file. –  kingsmasher1 Aug 9 '12 at 10:08
    
@kingsmasher1 Why are you talking about variables? VERSION is a macro here. Both these solutions work (provided that VERSION doesn't contain a % ... if it does, the second solution yields undefined behavior; puts would be better, as noted by nhahtdh above). You should accept the answer. –  Jim Balter Aug 9 '12 at 10:13
    
Thanks, accepted and upvoted too :) –  kingsmasher1 Aug 9 '12 at 10:21
    
@kingsmasher1 If we are talking about resource strings, you can only use the string concatenation variant. Problem could (will?) be: Visual Studio resource editor might not like rc files with string concatenation. Another solution would be removing the version sub string from all rc strings and building the complete strings at runtime. I am using FormatMessage for this kind of stuff. –  Werner Henze Aug 9 '12 at 11:17
    
@WernerHenze: Please remove the later one printf("Trying to print macro: " VERSION); this does not work. I just tested it now. Yesterday askd the question and rushed home from office due to a headache, so could not test :) –  kingsmasher1 Aug 10 '12 at 5:25
printf("Trying to print macro: %s", VERSION);
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This is really a comment, not an answer to the question. Please use "add comment" to leave feedback for the author. –  Kartik Aug 9 '12 at 12:06

Is is a string, %s should work.

int main()
{
  printf("Trying to print macro: %s", VERSION);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I thought to use a variable, but we can't because many of the files are *.rc file, where they only use a macro. And some are C or CPP file –  kingsmasher1 Aug 9 '12 at 10:09
    
@kingsmasher1 Why do you keep talking about variables? The given code works fine if VERSION is a macro that expands to a string literal. –  Jim Balter Aug 9 '12 at 10:35

Try this

#define PRINT(format,args...)\
\
    do { \
        printf(" your data...");\
        } \
    } while(0)
share|improve this answer
    
Er, I suggest that you read the question more carefully, for starters. –  Jim Balter Aug 9 '12 at 10:36
    
If you have a new question, please ask it by clicking the Ask Question button. Include a link to this question if it helps provide context. –  Kartik Aug 9 '12 at 12:09

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