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awk supports this:

awk '{print $(NF-1);}'

but not for user-defined variables:

awk '{a=123; b="a"; print $($b);}'

by the way, shell supports this:

a=123;
b="a";
eval echo \${$b};

How can I achieve my purpose in awk?

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1  
awk has array, even 2-d array (gawk 4.0 supports real 2-d array) why not consider to use array for your requirement? or just give an example, what input/output you want to handle/get. –  Kent Aug 9 '12 at 10:09
    
for array[a][b][c], I'm using array[a,b,c]. but array1=array[c], array[a,b]=array1 much more better –  fanlix Aug 9 '12 at 10:44
2  
In bash, you should use ${!b} to do variable indirection, not eval. –  chepner Aug 9 '12 at 12:02
    
shell != bash. ${!b} is valid in bash, but not in "the shell", which is best interpreted as generic bourne shell. –  William Pursell Aug 9 '12 at 16:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Not at the moment. However, if you provide a wrapper, it is (somewhat hacky and dirty) possible. The idea is to use @ operator, introduced in the recent versions of gawk.

This @ operator is normally used to call a function by name. So if you had

function foo(s){print "Called foo "s}
function bar(s){print "Called bar "s}
{
    var = "";
    if(today_i_feel_like_calling_foo){
        var = "foo";
    }else{
        var = "bar";
    }
    @var( "arg" ); # This calls function foo(), or function bar() with "arg"
}

Now, this is usefull on it's own. Assuming we know var names beforehand, we can write a wrapper to indirectly modify and obtain vars

function get(varname, this, call){call="get_"varname;return @call();}
function set(varname, arg, this, call){call="set_"varname; @call(arg);}

So now, for each var name you want to prrvide access by name, you declare these two functions

function get_my_var(){return my_var;}
function set_my_var(arg){my_var = arg;}

And prahaps, somewhere in your BEGIN{} block,

BEGIN{ my_var = ""; }

To declare it for global access. Then you can use

get("my_var");
set("my_var", "whatever");

This may appear useless at first, however there are perfectly good use cases, such as keeping a linked list of vars, by holding the var's name in another var's array, and such. It works for arrays too, and to be honest, I use this for nesting and linking Arrays within Arrays, so I can walk through multiple Arrays like using pointers.

You can also write configure scripts that refer to var names inside awk this way, in effect having a interpreter-inside-a-interpreter type of things, too...

Not the best way to do things, however, it gets the job done, and I do not have to worry about null pointer exceptions, or GC and such :-)

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yes, this should be the exact answer. but my awk has no @ operator.... –  fanlix Aug 15 '12 at 8:37
    
If you have gawk version >3.18 indirect function @ is supported. git repo 6f3612539c425da2bc1 on Nov/18/2010, or the cvs had it from early 2009 If you have git, try git clone git://git.savannah.gnu.org/gawk.git && cd gawk && ./configure && make && make check Or use your distributions package manager, like apt-get install gawk (as example for debian) –  GreenFox Aug 15 '12 at 16:38

OK, since some of us like to eat spaghetti through their nose, here is some actual code that I wrote in the past :-)
First of all, getting a self modifying code in a language that does not support it will be extremely non-trivial.

The idea to allow dynamic variables, function names, in a language that does not support one is very simple. At some state in the program, you want a dynamic anything to self modify your code, and resume execution from where you left off. a eval(), that is.

This is all very trivial, if the language supports eval() and such equlavant. However, awk does not have such function. Therefore, you, the programmer has to provide a interface to such thing.

To allow all this to happen, you have three main problems

  1. How to get our self so we can modify it
  2. How to load the modified code, and resume from where we left off
  3. Finding a way for the interpreter to accept our modified code

How to get our self so we can modify it

Here is a example code, suitable for direct execution. This one is the infastrucure that I inject for enviroments running gawk, as it requires PROCINFO

echo ""| awk '
function push(d){stack[stack[0]+=1]=d;}
function pop(){if(stack[0])return stack[stack[0]--];return "";}
function dbg_printarray(ary , x , s,e, this , i ){
 x=(x=="")?"A":x;for(i=((s)?s:1);i<=((e)?e:ary[0]);i++){print x"["i"]=["ary[i]"]"}}
function dbg_argv(A ,this,p){
 A[0]=0;p="/proc/"PROCINFO["pid"]"/cmdline";push(RS);RS=sprintf("%c",0);
 while((getline v <p)>0)A[A[0]+=1]=v;RS=pop();close(p);}
{
    print "foo";
    dbg_argv(A);
    dbg_printarray(A);
    print "bar";
}'

Result:

foo
A[1]=[awk]
A[2]=[
function push(d){stack[stack[0]+=1]=d;}
function pop(){if(stack[0])return stack[stack[0]--];return "";}
function dbg_printarray(ary , x , s,e, this , i ){
 x=(x=="")?"A":x;for(i=((s)?s:1);i<=((e)?e:ary[0]);i++){print x"["i"]=["ary[i]"]"}}
function dbg_argv(A ,this,p){
 A[0]=0;p="/proc/"PROCINFO["pid"]"/cmdline";push(RS);RS=sprintf("%c",0);
 while((getline v <p)>0)A[A[0]+=1]=v;RS=pop();close(p);}
{
print "foo";
dbg_argv(A);
dbg_printarray(A);
print "bar";
}]
bar

As you can see, as long as the OS does not play with our args, and /proc/ is available, it is possible to read our self. This may appear useless at first, but we need it for push/pop of our stack, so that our execution state can be enbedded within the code, so we can save/resume and survive OS shutdown/reboots

I have left out the OS detection function and the bootloader (written in awk), because, if I publish that, kids can build platform independent polynormal code, and it is easy to cause havoc with it.

how to load the modified code, and resume from where we left off

Now, normaly you have push() and pop() for registers, so you can save your state and play with your self, and resume from where you left off. a Call and reading your stack is a typical way to get the memory address.

Unfortunetly, in awk, under normal situations we can not use pointers (with out a lot of dirty work), or registers (unless you can inject other stuff along the way). However you need a way to suspend and resume from your code.

The idea is simple. Instead of letting awk in control of your loops and while, if else conditions, recrusion depth, and functions you are in, the code should. Keep a stack, list of variable names, list of function names, and manage it your self. Just make sure that your code always calls self_modify( bool ) constantly, so that even upon sudden failure, As soon as the script is re-run, we can enter self_modify( bool ) and resume our state. When you want to self modify your code, you must provide a custom made write_stack() and read_stack() code, that writes out the state of stack as string, and reads string from the values out from the code embedded string itself, and resume the execution state.

Here is a small piece of code that demonstrates the whole flow

echo ""| awk '
function push(d){stack[stack[0]+=1]=d;}
function pop(){if(stack[0])return stack[stack[0]--];return "";}
function dbg_printarray(ary , x , s,e, this , i ){
 x=(x=="")?"A":x;for(i=((s)?s:1);i<=((e)?e:ary[0]);i++){print x"["i"]=["ary[i]"]"}}
function _(s){return s}
function dbg_argv(A ,this,p){
 A[0]=0;p="/proc/"PROCINFO["pid"]"/cmdline";push(RS);RS=sprintf("%c",0);
 while((getline v <p)>0)A[A[0]+=1]=v;RS=pop();close(p);}
{
    _(BEGIN_MODIFY"|");print "#foo";_("|"END_MODIFY)
    dbg_argv(A);
    sub( \
    "BEGIN_MODIFY\x22\x5c\x7c[^\x5c\x7c]*\x5c\x7c\x22""END_MODIFY", \
    "BEGIN_MODIFY\x22\x7c\x22);print \"#"PROCINFO["pid"]"\";_(\x22\x7c\x22""END_MODIFY" \
     ,A[2]) 
    print "echo \x22\x22\x7c awk \x27"A[2]"";
    print "function bar_"PROCINFO["pid"]"_(s){print \x22""doe\x22}";
    print "\x27"
}'

Result:

Exactly same as our original code, except

_(BEGIN_MODIFY"|");print "65964";_("|"ND_MODIFY)

and

function bar_56228_(s){print "doe"}

at the end of code

Now, this may seem useless, as we are only replaceing code print "foo"; with our pid. But it becomes usefull, when there are multiple _() with separate MAGIC strings to identify BLOCKS, and a custome made multi line string replacement routine instead of sub()

You msut provide BLOCKS for stack, function list, execution point, as a bare minimum.

And notice that the last line contains bar This it self is just a sting, but when this code repeatedly gets executed, notice that

function bar_56228_(s){print "doe"}
function bar_88128_(s){print "doe"}
...

and it keeps growing. While the example is intentionally made so that it does nothing useful, if we provide a routine to call bar_pid_(s) instead of that print "foo" code, Sudenly it means we have eval() on our hands :-) Now, isn't eval() usefull :-)

Don't forget to provide a custome made remove_block() function so that the code maintains a reasonable size, instead of growing every time you execute.

Finding a way for the interpreter to accept our modified code

Normally calling a binary is trivial. However, when doing so from with in awk, it becomes difficult. You may say system() is the way.

There are two problems to that.

  1. system() may not work on some envoroments
  2. it blocks while you are executing code, trus you can not perform recrusive calls and keep the user happy at the same time.

If you must use system(), ensure that it does not block. A normal call to system("sleep 20 && echo from-sh & ") will not work. The solution is simple,

echo ""|awk '{print "foo";E="echo ep ; sleep 20 && echo foo & disown ; ";  E | getline v;close(E);print "bar";}'

Now you have a async system() call that does not block :-)

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Exellent, you offer more than i want. Like a virus infests shell. –  fanlix Aug 17 '12 at 9:09

The $ notation is not a mark for variables, as in shell, PHP, Perl etc. It is rather an operator, which receives an integer value n and returns the n-th column from the input. So, what you did in the first example is not the setting/getting of a variable dynamically but rather a call to an operator/function.

As stated by commenters, you can archive the behavior you are looking for with arrays:

awk '{a=123; b="a"; v[b] = a; print v[b];}'
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the description of $. But your answer not helps, v[b]=a should not appear. –  fanlix Aug 15 '12 at 8:46
    
i mean: awk '{ v["a"]=123; b="a"; print v[b];}' –  fanlix Aug 15 '12 at 8:59
    
@fanlix why not? I mean, we can help better if you explain what you are trying to do and why. –  brandizzi Aug 15 '12 at 13:47

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