Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have this table

attendance (4M rows at the moment, growing 1.2M per week):

-------------------------------------------------------------
| member_id | attendance_week | attendance_date | event_id  |
------------------------------------------------------------
|  INT (10) |   TINYINT(2)    |   TIMESTAMP     |TINYINT(3) |
-------------------------------------------------------------

attendance indeces:
--------------------------------------------------
| PRIMARY (attendance_week, member_id, event_id) |
| member_id (member_id)                          |
| event_id (event_id, attendance_week)
| total (attendance_week, event_id)              |
--------------------------------------------------

members (400k rows at the moment growing 750 a week):
-------------------------
| member_id |  dept_id  |
-------------------------
|  INT (10) |SMALLINT(5)|
-------------------------

member indeces:
-----------------------
| PRIMARY (member_id) |
| 
-----------------------

Events are weekly, meaning you'll see pairs of member_id and event_id for each week.

Now I have to generate a report of for a certain department each event, current attendance (i.e. if this member already checked-in), and their attendance over at least 4 weeks (i.e. attended / total events for a duration)

This is for the current_attendance part of the report. I fetch all members for a department and LEFT JOIN it with this week's event to get NULL for absences:

SELECT
  m.member_id AS id,
  a.event_id AS attended
FROM
  members AS m
LEFT JOIN
  attendance AS a
  ON
    a.member_id = m.member_id AND
    a.attendance_week = :week AND
    a.event_id = :event
WHERE
  m.dept_id = :dept
GROUP BY
  m.member_id

This is for the attended part of the report. :

SELECT
  a.member_id,
  COUNT(a.event_id)
FROM
  attendance a 
  JOIN
    members m 
    ON 
      a.member_id = m.member_id AND
      m.dept_id = :dept
WHERE
  a.attendance_week BETWEEN :start AND :end
GROUP BY
  a.member_id

I could probably merge these two queries by simply LEFT JOIN-ing the attendance table again on the first query.

And finally for the total part

SELECT
  attendance_week,
  COUNT(DISTINCT event_id)
FROM
  attendance
WHERE
  attendance_week BETWEEN :start AND :end
GROUP BY
  attendance_week

These are the main queries that will be run for these tables. At this moment, the queries run for an average of 150 - 200ms (according to phpMyAdmin) which I think is slow. EXPLAIN tells me that my indeces are being used.

So here are my questions:

  1. Is there any other way that I can revise my indeces and queries to make this faster?
  2. I assume that MySQL has a cache of compiled statements. I'm not talking about the results cache, think PHP opcode vs HTML cache. I already tried SQL_NO_CACHE and I still get the same response time, and query_cache_size is 0. I could swear that I saw phpMyAdmin report the queries at around 800ms once (which is unacceptable) but I don't get them now. How do I measure the true speed of my queries everytime they are run?
  3. Will these be faster if I put these queries in a stored procedure?
  4. Any thoughts for storage methods? The database is currently around 400MB in size. After a year, I don't know, maybe 3GB? Is this scalable? I'm really new when it comes to DBA, I've read master-slave replication and partitioning but I don't know if it is good for this.

If you ever need more info, please comment below. I'll try to provide it. I really did try to do this alone, but given the demands of a huge database (my largest so far) and high performance, I really need some advice :D

Thanks

EDIT

I just realized a terrible flaw in my logic, newly registered members will show up having low attendance performance since the 3rd query doesn't take registration date into account. I have a registration_date column in my members table, is there any way I can incorporate that variable into the query? Or merge all three queries in just once? Since they all return values that are dependent on each user.

EDIT

I've managed to merge the first two queries:

    SELECT
      m.member_id AS id,
      a.event_id AS attended,
      COUNT(b.event_id) AS total_attended
    FROM
      members AS m
      LEFT JOIN
        attendance AS a
        ON
          a.member_id = m.member_id AND
          a.attendance_week = :week AND
          a.event_id = :event
      LEFT JOIN
        attendance AS b
        ON
          b.member_id = m.member_id AND
          b.attendance_week BETWEEN :start AND :end
    WHERE
      m.dept_id = :dept
    GROUP BY
      m.member_id

This query runs for 925ms on the first run and 15ms on subsequent requests.

This is the result of the above query's EXPLAIN

members table:
id:            1
select_type:   SIMPLE
table:         m
type:          ref
possible_keys: dept_id
key:           dept_id
key_len:       3
ref:           const
rows:          88
Extra:         Using where; Using index

attendance table 1 (for the boolean attended part):
id:            1
select_type:   SIMPLE
table:         a
type:          eq_ref
possible_keys: PRIMARY,member_id,event_id,total
key:           PRIMARY
key_len:       6
ref:           const,arms_db.m.member_id,const
rows:          1
Extra:         Using index

attendance table 2 (for the total attendanded part):
id:            1
select_type:   SIMPLE
table:         b
type:          ref
possible_keys: PRIMARY,member_id,total
key:           member_id
key_len:       4
ref:           arms_db.m.member_id
rows:          5
Extra:         Using index

And the EXPLAIN for the last query:

id:            1
select_type:   SIMPLE
table:         attendance
type:          range
possible_keys: PRIMARY,toral
key:           total
key_len:       2
ref:           NULL
rows:          9
Extra:         Using where; Using index for groub-by
share|improve this question
    
What is the MySQL server version? –  ring0 Aug 10 '12 at 1:53
    
5.5.25a Community Server –  Rolando Cruz Aug 10 '12 at 2:34
    
Are the tables MyISAM or InnoDB? –  ypercube Aug 10 '12 at 9:08
    
The tables are InnoDB –  Rolando Cruz Aug 10 '12 at 9:31
    
The 3rd query (total part) seems to be using the (event_id, attendance_week) index and I don't think there is any better index for this one. How fast it is? –  ypercube Aug 10 '12 at 9:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Adding covering or clustered indexes on tables will give you the best performance:

  1. You can add extra index on table member also:

    member indeces:(member_id, dept_id)

  2. you can enable Query Cache to cache query output but Query Cache doesn't work with procedures. To measure exact speed of queries you can use mysqlslap client utility .

  3. Queries inside stored procedure won't make much difference in terms of speed but it will save some additional overhead of query parsing and sending output to client.

  4. Distributing data over different servers using sharding or replication will help you in terms of scalability. Partitioning on huge tables will also benefit you.

share|improve this answer
    
For #4 is this setup suitable for both partitioning and replication? Is it possible to use both? –  Rolando Cruz Aug 10 '12 at 5:52
    
yes, you can do partitioning and replication on same table. –  Omesh Aug 10 '12 at 7:46
    
any thoughts on the update on my question? –  Rolando Cruz Aug 10 '12 at 8:32
    
It doesn't make sense to combine those queries into one as you have a different WHERE conditions and GROUP BY clause for third query. but you can use UNION ALL to merge output of all three queries. regarding registration_date output is right but if you want to manipulate it then you can do it somehow. –  Omesh Aug 10 '12 at 11:36
  1. Your design seems valid. I think, that having reports done within 200ms (even up to 800ms) is perfectly fine for the Reporting applications. As to the new indexes, I would first checked if it really worth doing, 'cos, say, if you have all you members equally spread over only 5 depts, then index on member.dept_id will not be usefull — it is cheaper to perform a full scan in such a case.

  2. I don't see the point of measuring the “true” speed of the queries, as Databases are there to speed up data access by effectivelly caching your data. So if you're in a situation when on a freshly started DB server your query takes round 800ms and further executions' times go down to 50-100ms, then this a good setup and this is what I'm aiming for in my daily job.

  3. I doubt it, as stored procedures will give you a small extra time required to execute the procedure and obtain it's results, compared to the benefit of having all statements parsed by the time procedure is called.

  4. At the moment your speed is just fine for non-OLTP application. And for me it seems that partitioning attendance table by the attendance_week column will give you a nice performance boost, as all your queries go around this column. But benefits will be visible when you'll have more data in the system, at least 3-4 weeks worth of it.

My assumptions might be wrong, though, for the OLTP system. Could you specify the intened usage area of the provided example?

Also, it'd be good to see the actual output of EXPLAIN statements for your queries.

share|improve this answer
    
This is actually an OLTP system (if I correctly understood what Wikipedia said). What I detailed here is the reporting part of the system which is generated by each operator after a series of transactions. Here is a description of the input part of the report: serverfault.com/questions/411804/… I've made some modifications to the requests in that attendance are now sent by batch, but member_id lookups are still done on a per-member basis. But this will still be a write-heavy application, I think. –  Rolando Cruz Aug 10 '12 at 1:06
    
I've edited the question :D –  Rolando Cruz Aug 10 '12 at 8:32
    
@RolandoCruz, well, having query done within 15ms is good. Your EXPLAIN output looks very nice. What more do you want ot achieve? I'd more then happy with such results. –  vyegorov Aug 10 '12 at 8:51
    
I was a bit concerned when I saw that 800ms once. So I thought that I might be doing things wrong. I know that I might just be over-optimizing but given that this is my first huge application, I really don't know which numbers are bad and which are good :D I'll be waiting for other answers regarding my 2nd edit and will probably accept an answer soon :D –  Rolando Cruz Aug 10 '12 at 9:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.