Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new to Python, and I've only written a couple programs. Here's a recent code I wrote for a rock-paper-scissors game. I've already tested it and it works great. Is there any way I can simplify it? Thanks!

import random

wins=0   
losses=0    
ties=0    
rounds=0

r=1 #rock    
p=2 #paper    
s=3 #scissors

y = "The computer has made its choice, how about you?"

while rounds <= 10:    
 print y    
 x = input('(1)rock, (2)paper, or (3)scissors? :')
 choice = x    
 cpu_choice= random.randint(1, 3)

if (choice, cpu_choice) == (1, 2):    
  rounds += 1    
  losses += 1    
  print 'computer chose paper, you lose'
elif (choice, cpu_choice) == (3, 2):    
  print 'you win'    
  rounds += 1    
  wins += 1    
elif (choice, cpu_choice) == (2, 2):    
  print 'TIE!'    
  rounds += 1    
  ties += 1    
elif (choice, cpu_choice) == (1, 3):    
  print 'you win'    
  rounds += 1    
  wins += 1    
elif (choice, cpu_choice) == (3, 3):   
  print 'TIE!'    
  rounds += 1    
  ties += 1    
elif (choice, cpu_choice) == (2, 3):    
  print 'computer chose scissors, you lose'    
  rounds += 1    
  losses += 1    
elif (choice, cpu_choice) == (1, 1):    
  print 'TIE'    
  rounds += 1    
  ties += 1    
elif (choice, cpu_choice) == (3, 1):    
  print 'computer chose rock, you lose'    
  rounds += 1    
  losses += 1    
elif (choice, cpu_choice) == (2, 1):    
  print 'you win'    
  rounds += 1    
  wins += 1    
else:    
  print 'Please choose 1, 2, or 3'

print 'Game Over'

if wins>losses:
  print 'YOU WON'    
  print 'wins:' , wins   
  print 'losses' , losses    
  print 'ties' , ties    
else:    
 print 'you lose'    
 print 'wins:' , wins    
 print 'losses:' , losses    
 print 'ties:' , ties
share|improve this question
    
Please format your code –  Mikael Aug 9 '12 at 10:40
2  
"The computer has made its choice, how about you?" -- it hasn't at the time you print the message ;) –  armandino Aug 9 '12 at 10:41
2  
codereview.stackexchange.com is made for questions like that. –  moooeeeep Aug 9 '12 at 10:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

While stackoverflow is not really meant as a learning platform, here are some advises:

  • Read the ZEN (type import this into your python console).
  • In your particular case, plenty of conditions are usually a bad idea.

At the very least, all TIE conditions can be thrown together:

 if choice == cpu_choice:
    # TIE

Throw in some grammar:

names = ['rock', 'paper', 'scissors']
print("Computer chooses {}, you loose".format(names[cpu_choice]))

Essentially, there are only three conditions:

wins, losses = 0, 0

for round in range(10):

    # Your choice and CPU choice

    cpu_wins = (cpu_choice > choice or (choice == 3 and cpu_choice == 1))
    tie = (cpu_choice == choice)

    if cpu_wins:
        # You loose
        print("Computer chooses {}, you loose".format(names[cpu_choice]))
        losses += 1
    if not cpu_wins and tie:
        # tie
    else:
        # you win

Also, you don't even use the variables p, r and s defined above....

share|improve this answer

Some suggestions:

  1. All your conditional cases contain round variable increasing, except when wrong data input occured, so you can bring round += 1 lines out upper, and decrrease round variable only once in else case

  2. You have if cases that do same jobs, e.g. when 'TIE!' happened; it's better to group such cases. 'TIE!' cases can be grouped under one condition choice == cpu_choice thus ommiting 3 elif clauses. Think about the same problem in other game cases.

  3. Use better code formatting, e.g. what PEP-8 standard suggests.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for mentioning PEP-8 –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Aug 9 '12 at 11:16

Don't repeat yourself:

  • rounds += 1 happens in every round so you don't have to put in every branch
  • printing the result numbers happens always, too.
  • Indent your code using four spaces
share|improve this answer

You can determine whether the player wins using modulo arithmetic:

player_result = ["tie", "win", "lose"]
player_choice = input('(1)rock, (2)paper, or (3)scissors? :')
cpu_choice= random.randint(1, 3)
result = player_result[(player_choice - cpu_choice) % 3]

print "You " + result
if result == "win":
    wins += 1
elif result == "lose":
    loses += 1
share|improve this answer
    
I'd prefer (player_choice - cpu_choice) % 3. I don't (want to) remember how tightly the mod operator % binds in python, so better play it safe. –  Henk Langeveld Aug 9 '12 at 11:03
1  
Good point - I've updated –  Peter Collingridge Aug 9 '12 at 11:08

I would do something like this, which may be a bit above your level, but If you research how this code works, you will be much better at pythoN! :)

from random import randint

def do_rounds(num_rounds):
    choice_dict = {1: 'rock', 2: 'paper', 3: 'scissors'}
    beats_dict = {1: 3, 2: 1, 3: 2}

    for round in range(num_rounds):
        computer_choice = randint(1, 3)
        while True:
            player_choice = raw_input('(1)rock, (2)paper, or (3)scissors? :')
            if player_choice in ("1", "2", "3"):
                player_choice = int(player_choice)
                break
            else:
                print "input must be an integer 1, 2 or 3"

        player_lost = beats_dict[computer_choice] == player_choice

        tie = 1 if computer_choice == player_choice else 0
        win = 0 if player_lost else 1
        loss = 1 if player_lost else 0
        print "computer picked: %s" % choice_dict[computer_choice],
        print " you picked: %s" % choice_dict[player_choice]
        yield tie, win, loss

def run_game():
    ties, wins, losses = zip(*do_rounds(4))
    ties, wins, losses = sum(ties), sum(wins), sum(losses)
    print "ties = %s, wins = %s, losses = %s" % (ties, wins, losses)
    if wins > losses:
        print "you won!"
    elif wins == losses:
        print "tie!"
    else:
        print "loser!!!"

if __name__ == "__main__":
    run_game()

"""
(1)rock, (2)paper, or (3)scissors? :3
computer picked: rock, you picked: scissors
(1)rock, (2)paper, or (3)scissors? :2
computer picked: paper, you picked: paper
(1)rock, (2)paper, or (3)scissors? :1
computer picked: paper, you picked: rock
(1)rock, (2)paper, or (3)scissors? :3
computer picked: rock, you picked: scissors
ties = 1, wins = 1, losses = 3
loser!!!
"""
share|improve this answer
    
Your assert statement does not do quite what you think it does. If your python script is run with the optimized (-O) command line option, all assert statements are silently skipped. So it is meant as a debugging tool, not as a replacement for if + raise. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Aug 9 '12 at 11:06
    
Yup - It's not ready for production yet. If so I would print out the appropriate message to the user and ask for another input. –  robert king Aug 9 '12 at 11:07
    
Why not just wrap the user input function in a while player_choice not in "123" instead? Also, input evaluates what the player types as python source code. This is normally not desired behaviour, and could be or become a security hole. Use raw_input instead. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Aug 9 '12 at 11:13
    
Done :) - I hope you can upvote! –  robert king Aug 9 '12 at 11:20
    
@lazyr your edit introduced a bug of if the input is 12 for example, it will accept the input! –  robert king Aug 9 '12 at 23:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.