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I have a contingency table for which I would like to calculate Cohens's kappa - the level of agreement. I have tried using three different packages, which all seem to fail to some degree. The package e1071 has a function specifically for a contingency table, but that too seems to fail. Below is reproducable code. You will need to install packages concord, e1071, and irr.

# Recreate my contingency table, output with dput
conf.mat<-structure(c(810531L, 289024L, 164757L, 114316L), .Dim = c(2L, 
2L), .Dimnames = structure(list(landsat_2000_bin = c("0", "1"
), MOD12_2000_binForest = c("0", "1")), .Names = c("landsat_2000_bin", 
"MOD12_2000_binForest")), class = "table")

library(concord)
cohen.kappa(conf.mat)
library(e1071)
classAgreement(conf.mat, match.names=TRUE)
library(irr)
kappa2(conf.mat) 

The output I get from running this is:

> cohen.kappa(conf.mat)
Kappa test for nominally classified data
4 categories - 2 methods
kappa (Cohen) = 0 , Z = NaN , p = NaN 
kappa (Siegel) = -0.333333 , Z = -0.816497 , p = 0.792892 
kappa (2*PA-1) = -1 

> classAgreement(conf.mat, match.names=TRUE)
    $diag
[1] 0.6708459
    $kappa
[1] NA
    $rand
[1] 0.5583764
    $crand
[1] 0.0594124
    Warning message:
In ni[lev] * nj[lev] : NAs produced by integer overflow

> kappa2(conf.mat) 
 Cohen's Kappa for 2 Raters (Weights: unweighted)
Subjects = 2 
Raters = 2 
Kappa = 0 
z = NaN 
p-value = NaN

Could anyone advise on why these might fail? I have a large dataset, but as this table is simple I didn't think that could cause such problems.

share|improve this question
    
Maybe, there's too few values in your data –  Pop Aug 9 '12 at 11:45
    
Contingency tables usually only have 2 rows and 2 columns. I don't see any reference to minimum size - only actual size, which my table seems to fit. –  gisol Aug 9 '12 at 12:37
    
Sorry. That was just an hypothesis. I have just worked once with this kind of functions... –  Pop Aug 9 '12 at 12:56
    
No worries, thanks for the input! –  gisol Aug 9 '12 at 13:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In the first function, cohen.kappa, you need to specify that you are using count data and not just a n*m matrix of n subjects and m raters.

# cohen.kappa(conf.mat,'count')
cohen.kappa(conf.mat,'count')

The second function is much more tricky. For some reason, your matrix is full of integer and not numeric. integer can't store really big numbers. So, when you multiply two of your big numbers together, it fails. For example:

i=975288 
j=1099555
class(i)
# [1] "numeric"
i*j
# 1.072383e+12
as.integer(i)*as.integer(j)
# [1] NA
# Warning message:
# In as.integer(i) * as.integer(j) : NAs produced by integer overflow

So you need to convert your matrix to have integers.

# classAgreement(conf.mat)
classAgreement(matrix(as.numeric(conf.mat),nrow=2))

Finally take a look at the documentation for ?kappa2. It requires an n*m matrix as explained above. It just won't work with your (efficient) data structure.

share|improve this answer
    
Ahh, that makes a lot of sense (the integer overflow). I suspected something like that might have happened. Using 'count' for the first function, 'cohen.kappa' doesn't give Cohen's kappa - just Siegel and kappa (2*PA-1). The 'classAgreement' function works perfectly with the 'numeric' modification, and agrees with the method below. Thanks! –  gisol Aug 10 '12 at 14:06
1  
I was actually wrong about cohen.kappa. It requires for n tests and m raters, it requires an m*n matrix, regardless of the type. So, in your data, you just can't use it because you have so many tests. –  nograpes Aug 10 '12 at 15:17

Do you need to know specifically why those fail? Here is a function that computes the statistic -- in a hurry, so I might clean it up later (kappa wiki):

kap <- function(x) {
  a <- (x[1,1] + x[2,2]) / sum(x)
  e <- (sum(x[1,]) / sum(x)) * (sum(x[,1]) / sum(x)) + (1 - (sum(x[1,]) / sum(x))) * (1 - (sum(x[,1]) / sum(x)))
  (a-e)/(1-e)
}

Tests/output:

> (x = matrix(c(20,5,10,15), nrow=2, byrow=T))
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]   20    5
[2,]   10   15
> kap(x)
[1] 0.4
> (x = matrix(c(45,15,25,15), nrow=2, byrow=T))
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]   45   15
[2,]   25   15
> kap(x)
[1] 0.1304348
> (x = matrix(c(25,35,5,35), nrow=2, byrow=T))
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]   25   35
[2,]    5   35
> kap(x)
[1] 0.2592593
> kap(conf.mat)
[1] 0.1258621
share|improve this answer
    
Great, thanks - this gives the same result as the 'classAgreement' function above - reassuring! –  gisol Aug 10 '12 at 14:04

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