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I am trying to make a 3D scatter plot and color-code the symbols. If the RGB colors are defined by nan, why does are the points plotted in black? This expression is okay:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D

carr = np.array([[0,0,0,1],[0,0,1,1],[0,1,0,1]]) # RGBA color array

ax = plt.axes(projection='3d')
h = ax.scatter([1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],
               c=carr)
plt.draw()

New color array with nan:

carr = np.array([[0,0,0,1],np.repeat(np.nan,4),[0,1,0,1]])

ax = plt.axes(projection='3d')
h = ax.scatter([1,2,3],[1,2,3],[1,2,3],
               c=carr)
plt.draw()

The point for which the color is defined as nan is shown in black rather than nothing or some other color. Is there a way to make it not show up? In R, points for which colors are defined as NA are not plotted, which is convenient when you designate the color by some logical expression.

Of course... I can always subset the array for plotting, but if I can exclude it with the color definition that would be better.

On a side note, why does

carr[1:] = np.nan

after the first definition of carr give me

array([[                   0,                    0,                    0,
                           1],
       [-9223372036854775808, -9223372036854775808, -9223372036854775808,
        -9223372036854775808],
       [                   0,                    1,                    0,
                           1]])

instead of

array([[  0.,   0.,   0.,   1.],
       [ nan,  nan,  nan,  nan],
       [  0.,   1.,   0.,   1.]])
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This has nothing to do with 3D plotting, the same issue exists for matplotlib.scatter as well. There are really two issues. The first is that the different carr's have different internal types. Note that this will fail:

import numpy as np
import pylab as plt

# This fails since carr[0,0] is of type numpy.int64
carr = np.array([[0,0,0,1],[0,0,1,1],[0,1,0,1]]) # RGBA color array
carr[1] = np.repeat(np.nan,4)

pts = np.array([[1,2],[1,3],[2,2]]).T
plt.scatter(pts[0],pts[1],c=carr,s=500)

In the next case, if we force carr to be a numpy.float we can plot, but as noted nan's are shown as black dots:

# This works but still puts a black dot for the nan point
carr = np.array([[0.0,0,0,1],[0,0,1,1],[0,1,0,1]]) # RGBA color array
carr[1] = np.repeat(np.nan,4)

pts = np.array([[1,2],[1,3],[2,2]]).T
plt.scatter(pts[0],pts[1],c=carr,s=500)

If we instead define a mask, we can index the points we want. This is the preferred method when dealing with numpy arrays:

carr = np.array([[0.0,0,0,1],[0,0,1,1],[0,1,0,1]]) # RGBA color array
carr[1] = np.repeat(np.nan,4)
pts = np.array([[1,2],[1,3],[2,2]]).T

idx = ~np.isnan(carr[:,0])
plt.scatter(pts[0][idx],pts[1][idx],c=carr[idx],s=500)

Showing the two cases side by side:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I guess I could also add the argument dtype=np.float instead also. I forgot this part about Python. The explicit indexing is the most straightforward answer but I was hoping for a clever trick around it that uses the color definition. Oh well. –  crippledlambda Aug 9 '12 at 15:57
    
@crippledlambda In addition you can always cast an existing array as A.astype(np.float). IMHO this is better than a pyplot solution as you are documenting in the code which indices are being used. If you really wanted you could always wrap scatter to apply the filter as shown above, that way you get the effect you want. –  Hooked Aug 9 '12 at 16:13

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