Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to check if parameter $PGkey is equal to a key with the same name inside a hash table. Further, I want to do it in a format as close to this as possible:

while(<PARAdef>) {
    my($PGkey, $PGval) = split /\s+=\s+/;
    if($PGkey == $hash{$PGkey}) {
        print PARAnew "$PGkey = $hash{$PGkey}->[$id]\n";
    } else {
        print PARAnew "$PGkey = $PGval\n";
    }
}

Is there a simple way to do it?

share|improve this question
    
What exactly is the problem? Is your code not working? –  innaM Jul 27 '09 at 14:00
    
Are you sure "==" is the operator your want there? Are $PGkey and $hash{$PGkey} both numbers? If they're strings, use "eq" instead. –  John Siracusa Jul 27 '09 at 14:33
    
John - yes, they are strings. Mani - you can see Chas answer, maybe it will light you my solved problem :) –  YoDar Jul 27 '09 at 14:39
2  
Asking nebulous questions and then accepting the answer that accidentally fits what you were looking for is not the most effective way to use stackoverflow. –  innaM Jul 27 '09 at 15:05
1  
But decoding the question that the OP didn't ask is the SO advanced game, and really quite entertaining. I'm very proud of this one, for instance: stackoverflow.com/questions/1178141/… –  chaos Jul 27 '09 at 18:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using the conditional operator lets you factor out the common code in that if/else statement:

while ( <PARAdef> ) {
    chomp;
    my ($PGkey, $PGval) = split /\s+=\s+/;
    print "$PGkey = ",
        $PGval eq $hash{$PGkey}[$id] ? $hash{$PGkey}[$id] : $PGval, "\n";
}

Or if you just misstated the problem and really want to use $hash{$PGkey}[$id] if $hash{$PGkey} exists and fall back to $PGval if it doesn't, then you can say

while ( <PARAdef> ) {
    chomp;
    my ($PGkey, $PGval) = split /\s+=\s+/;
    print "$PGkey = ",
        $PGkey ne "def" and exists $hash{$PGkey} ?
            $hash{$PGkey}[$id] : $PGval, "\n";
}

A quick note, you seem to be using the old bareword style filehandles. The new (if ten years old can be considered new) lexical filehandles are superior in every way:

open my $PARAdef, "<", $filename
    or die "could not open $filename: $!";
share|improve this answer
3  
Please, sir, stop calling the conditional operator "the ternary operator". I beg of you. –  chaos Jul 27 '09 at 14:26
1  
No, Chas, please don't. –  innaM Jul 27 '09 at 14:30
3  
@Manni: Learn what "ternary operator" means, please. It means an operator that takes three arguments. ?: is not the only possible operator that takes three arguments. What it is legitimately defined by is the fact that it defines a conditional alternation, which is why to call it by its correct name, the conditional operator. –  chaos Jul 27 '09 at 14:31
1  
@chaos You have a good point. I will change it because it will make finding it in perlop easier. I could have sworn it was named the ternary in ANSI C (which is where I came from initially), but even in "The C Programming Language" it is referred to as the "conditional expresssion". –  Chas. Owens Jul 27 '09 at 15:10
1  
@Manni Take a look at perldoc.perl.org/perlop.html#Conditional-Operator, it surprised me as well, but hey, I got my learn-one-new-thing-a-day out of the way early today. –  Chas. Owens Jul 27 '09 at 15:11

Your question's kind of obscure, but the way to check for hash key existence is:

exists $hash{$key}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.