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Can extension methods be applied to the class?

For example, extend DateTime to include a Tomorrow() method that could be invoked like:

DateTime.Tomorrow();

I know I can use

static DateTime Tomorrow(this Datetime value) { //... }

Or

public static MyClass {
  public static Tomorrow() { //... }
}

for a similar result, but how can I extend DateTime so that I could invoke DateTime.Tomorrow?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 34 down vote accepted

You cannot add methods to an existing type, you can only add methods that appear to be a member of the existing type through extension methods. Since this is the case you cannot add static methods to the type itself since extension methods use instances of that type.

There is nothing stopping you from creating your own static helper method like this:

static class DateTimeHelper
{
    public static DateTime Tomorrow
    {
    	get { return DateTime.Now.AddDays(1); }
    }
}

Which you would use like this:

DateTime tomorrow = DateTimeHelper.Tomorrow;
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2  
huh woot? unless it was implemented within 6 months of this and Kumu's answer right there, this looks actually incomplete! –  Cawas Jun 22 '12 at 14:28
1  
@Cawas this is not incomplete, Andrew is showing how to do this with a static helper, not with an extension method (since there is no instance). –  Nick N. Aug 12 at 12:02
    
You're right, Nick. I do prefer extension methods though! ;) –  Cawas Aug 12 at 22:48

Create Extension Methods: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb383977.aspx

Ex:

namespace ExtensionMethods
{
    public static class MyExtensionMethods
    {
        public static DateTime Tomorrow(this DateTime date)
        {
            return date.AddDays(1);
        }    
    }
}

usage:

DateTime.Now.Tomorrow();

or (any object of type DateTime).Tomorrow();
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Shuggy's answer also shred some light on similar way to solving this. –  Cawas Jun 22 '12 at 14:30
2  
Don't forget 'using ExtensionMethods;' at the top of your document for this. –  Luke Alderton Jul 3 '13 at 13:19
    
why can't i do DateTime.Tomorrow()? –  lawphotog Jul 17 at 9:11
    
Hi lawphotog, this extension needs an object, here DateTime is a struct and not an object. –  Kumu Jul 18 at 0:36

Extension methods are syntactic sugar for making static methods whose first parameter is an instance of type T look as if they were an instance method on T.

As such the benefit is largely lost where you to make 'static extension methods' since they would serve to confuse the reader of the code even more than an extension method (since they appear to be fully qualified but are not actually defined in that class) for no syntactical gain (being able to chain calls in a fluent style within Linq for example).

Since you would have to bring the extensions into scope with a using anyway I would argue that it is simpler and safer to create:

public static class DateTimeUtils
{
    public static DateTime Tomorrow { get { ... } }
}

And then use this in your code via:

WriteLine("{0}", DateTimeUtils.Tomorrow)
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Hmm... this is actually a very interesting question. :D

The closest I can get to the answer is by adding an extension method into a System.Type object. Not pretty, but still interesting.

public static class Foo
{
    public static void Bar()
    {
        var now = DateTime.Now;
        var tomorrow = typeof(DateTime).Tomorrow();
    }

    public static DateTime Tomorrow(this System.Type type)
    {
        if (type == typeof(DateTime)) {
            return DateTime.Now.AddDays(1);
        } else {
            throw new InvalidOperationException();
        }
    }
}

Otherwise, IMO Andrew and ShuggyCoUk has a better implementation.

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There are problems with this approach. Having to type "typeof(...)" is not convenient, and with intellisense you would see extensions of every type. Still, it's an interesting approach that I hadn't thought of, +1. –  Meta-Knight Jul 27 '09 at 14:04
    
@Meta-Knight True, that's why personally I prefer the other's answer. My answer would have the closest syntax to OP question, but it's not the best way to solve this problem. –  Adrian Godong Jul 27 '09 at 14:40

I would do the same as Kumu

namespace ExtensionMethods
{
    public static class MyExtensionMethods
    {
        public static DateTime Tomorrow(this DateTime date)
        {
           return date.AddDays(1);
        }    
    }
}

but call it like this new DateTime().Tomorrow();

Think it makes more seens than DateTime.Now.Tomorrow();

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And you missed a chance to write it as a comment on Kumu's answer! :P –  Cawas Jun 22 '12 at 14:28

Unfortunately, you can't do that. I believe it would be useful, though. It is more natural to type:

DateTime.Tomorrow

than:

DateTimeUtil.Tomorrow

With a Util class, you have to check for the existence of a static method in two different classes, instead of one.

This feature has been suggested several times, like here. It's too late for it to be included in the next version (4.0) of VB/C# though.

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I was looking for something similar - a list of constraints on classes that provide Extension Methods. Seems tough to find a concise list so here goes:

  1. You can't have any private or protected anything - fields, methods, etc.

  2. It must be a static class, as in public static class....

  3. Only methods can be in the class, and they must all be public static.

  4. You can't have conventional static methods - ones that don't include a this argument aren't allowed.

  5. All methods must begin:

    public static ReturnType MethodName(this ClassName _this, ...)

So the first argument is always the this reference.

There is an implicit problem this creates - if you add methods that require a lock of any sort, you can't really provide it at the class level. Typically you'd provide a private instance-level lock, but it's not possible to add any private fields, leaving you with some very awkward options, like providing it as a public static on some outside class, etc. Gets dicey.

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They provide the capability to extend existing types by adding new methods with no modifications necessary to the type. Calling methods from objects of the extended type within an application using instance method syntax is known as ‘‘extending’’ methods. Extension methods are not instance members on the type. The key point to remember is that extension methods, defined as static methods, are in scope only when the namespace is explicitly imported into your application source code via the using directive. Even though extension methods are defined as static methods, they are still called using instance syntax.

Check the full example here http://www.dotnetreaders.com/articles/Extension_methods_in_C-sharp.net,Methods_in_C_-sharp/201

Example:

class Extension
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string s = "sudhakar";
            Console.WriteLine(s.GetWordCount());
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

    }
    public static class MyMathExtension
    {

        public static int GetWordCount(this System.String mystring)
        {
            return mystring.Length;
        }
    }
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