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JVM provides great performance - it's on the one hand. Golang sounds like a new paradigm and extremely productive - on the other hand. If we could bring together the best of two worlds - JVM performance and golang productivity - we could get a lot of benefits. Does anyone know any project that provides golang implementation in java?

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Generally for a moving target you only want a Java port if it is done by the main team. Any "try to keep up"-port will be inferior. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Aug 9 '12 at 11:52
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Currently, Go compiles to machine code. The JVM isn't going to be faster than that. –  Taymon Aug 9 '12 at 11:55
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@Taymon well, actually... But I do agree that not all languages other than java perform so well on the JVM, so a JVM version of Go is not likely to improve performance vs gc/gccgo –  Paolo Falabella Aug 9 '12 at 12:41
    
Java may beat Go on some benchmarks, but that's not due to the JVM being inherently faster than native code. There may be advantages to running Go on a JVM, but speed really isn't one of them. –  Darshan-Josiah Barber Aug 11 '12 at 1:20
    
Not entirely related: JNI bindings for Go github.com/abneptis/GoJVM –  Alexis Dufrenoy Jul 17 '14 at 11:23

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

A quick search came up with

http://code.google.com/p/jgo/

This link suggest it's the main or only effort.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_JVM_languages

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And github.com/elazarl/go-java –  Zippoxer Aug 9 '12 at 12:14
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Also code.google.com/p/ravi-lang –  artella Oct 29 '12 at 12:09

It may be difficult to make a good JVM implementation of Go. Rob Pike, who is one of Go's creators, spoke about this on episode 0.0.3 of the Changelog podcast:

[timecode 17:05] For instance, it is quite difficult to implement Go's interface model using a JVM: you might have to add a bytecode to deal with some of the type stuff. So for some of these existing systems [(JVM and CLR)] it's not quite obvious how Go would run with them […]

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Umm, Scala has a vastly more expressive type system than Go. –  Jeff Burdges Sep 18 '14 at 7:14

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