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I have an object with 2 properties:

public class Request
{
    public int TypeId { get; set; }
    public bool isApproved { get; set; }
}

What I wish to happen is, if TypeId equals 1, I want isApproved to equal false, otherwise I want it to equal true when I create a new object. I tried the following but it was set to true for both of my objects, where I do the rule in the constructor:

public Request() {
    if(this.TypeId == 1) {
        this.isApproved = false;
    }
    this.isApproved = true;
}

var request = new Request() {
    TypeId = 1
}

var request2 = new Request() {
    TypeId = 2
}

I know why this occurred, its because TypeId hasn't been set when the constructor is called, so it defaults to true. Is there anyway I can set this automatically once TypeId has been set on a newly created object?

Edit

I'd also like to have the option to change isApproved manually at a later date, so if it was set to false I can change it to true without the automatic rule I set affecting it

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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try changing

public int TypeId { get; set; }

to

public int _typeId;

public int TypeId 
{
    get
    {
        return _typeId;
    }
    set
    {
        _typeId = value;
        isApproved = value != 1;
    }
}
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Thank you, this worked just fine! I'm also able to edit it.. –  BiffBaffBoff Aug 9 '12 at 12:11
    
@BiffBaffBoff This does not match your specification as if you change the TypeId later the IsApproved will also automatically change, in direct contridition to: without the automatic rule I set affecting it no? –  asawyer Aug 9 '12 at 12:16
    
@asawyer I'm only going to change the typeId AWAY from 1, so in worst case, it'll change to true which will be fine anyway. My app is never going to change typeId equal to 1. –  BiffBaffBoff Aug 9 '12 at 12:26
    
@BiffBaffBoff I see. Very happy you found an answer then :) –  asawyer Aug 9 '12 at 12:27
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I would put the logic in the IsApproved getter, and make it a read only value:

public class Request
{
    public int TypeId { get; set; }
    public bool IsApproved 
    { 
        get
        {
            return this.TypeId != 1;
        }
}

Oh, also C# code standards usually specify that properties should be CamelCased.

Edit:

I'd also like to have the option to change isApproved manually at a later date, so if it was set to false I can change it to true without the automatic rule I set affecting it

You would want to set it with a constructor then. (As Alex already suggested)

public class Request
{
    public int TypeId { get; set; }
    public bool IsApproved { get; set; }

    public Request(int typeId)
    {
        this.TypeId = typeId;
        this.IsApproved = typeId != 1;
    }
}
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C# 4.0 allows you to assign a default value to method parameters, and makes you able to do this:

public Request(int TypeId = 1)
{
    approved = TypeId != 1;
}

usage:

var request = new Request(2); // approved = true
var request2 = new Request(1); //approved = false
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public class Request
{
    private int _typeId;
    public int TypeId { 
        get { return _typeId; }
        set {
            _typeId = value;
            isApproved = _typeId != 1;
        }
    }
    public bool isApproved { get; private set; }
}
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add comment
public class Request
{
    private int _typeId;
    public int TypeId 
    get
    {
        return _typeId;
    }
    set
    {
        isApproved = value != 1;
        _typeId = value;
    }

    public bool isApproved { get; set; }
}
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add comment

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