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I'm writing a String class. I'd like to be able to assign my strings such as;

a = "foo";
printf(a);
a = "123";
printf(a);
int n = a; // notice str -> int conversion
a = 456; // notice int -> str conversion
printf(a);

I've already assigned my operator=() method for string to integer conversion. How can I declare another operator=() so that I can do the reverse method?

When I declare another, it seems to override the previous.

String::operator const char *() {
    return cpStringBuffer;
}
String::operator const int() {
    return atoi(cpStringBuffer);
}
void String::operator=(const char* s) {
    ResizeBuffer(strlen(s));
    strcpy(cpStringBuffer, s);
}
bool String::operator==(const char* s) {
    return (strcmp(cpStringBuffer, s) != 0);
}

//void String::operator=(int n) {
//  char _cBuffer[33];
//  char* s = itoa(n, _cBuffer, 10);
//  ResizeBuffer(strlen(_cBuffer));
//  strcpy(cpStringBuffer, _cBuffer);
//}
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Note: this "str -> int conversion" and the opposite, probably does not do what you think it does. –  Kiril Kirov Aug 9 '12 at 12:37
    
Needs homework tag ? –  Paul R Aug 9 '12 at 12:37
    
This isn't homework. I was inspired to make a String class that mimics functional language strings because I got sick of doing the conversions myself. –  kvanberendonck Aug 9 '12 at 12:39
2  
@kvanberendonck does it mimic functional languages??? Actually it mimic languages with dynamic type system (and if it's what you need then you should consider to use ANOTHER language instead of C++ because often type-safety is his reason to be). –  Adriano Repetti Aug 9 '12 at 12:41
1  
@Alderath: It can be done, and has in the question, by providing implicit conversions The operator int() defined above will be called when a String is used in a context where an int is required (handwaving here), but also in many contexts where it could be unwanted (where an int could be used) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 9 '12 at 12:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A single-argument constructor can act as an int->String conversion, whereas a so-called conversion operator does the converse int->String

class String
{
public:
    String(int)            {} // initialization of String with int
    String& operator=(int) {} // assignment of int to String

    operator int() const {} // String to int
};

Note however, that these conversions will happen implicitly and you can easily get bitten. Suppose you would extend this class to also accept std::string arguments and conversions

class String
{
public:
    String(int)          {} // int to String
    String(std::string)  {} // std::string to String

    // plus two assignment operators 

    operator int() const       {} // String to int
    operator std::string const {} // String to std::string
};

and you would have these two function overloads

void fun(int)         { // bla }
void fun(std::string) { // bla }

Now try and call fun(String()). You get a compile error because there are multiple -equally viable- implicit conversions. THat's why C++98 allows the keyword explicit in front of single-argument constructors, and C++11 extends that to explicit conversion operators.

So you would write:

class String
{
public:
    explicit String(int)          {} // int to String
    explicit operator int() const {} // String to int 
};

One example where implicit conversion might be legitate is for smart pointer classes that want to convert to bool or (if they are templated) from smart_pointer<Derived> to smart_pointer<Base>.

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I tried String::String(int n) and the line s=123; where s is the string seems to be an invalid conversion. Does it only work for the constructor? –  kvanberendonck Aug 9 '12 at 12:53
    
With a constructor you could do either String s(123); or String s = 123;, but not String s; s = 123;. The latter is assignment, not initialization (so you would need to provide more assignment operators). –  TemplateRex Aug 9 '12 at 12:54
    
Ah, thanks. Much clearer now. What I actually need to do is assignment, sorry for the misunderstanding :) –  kvanberendonck Aug 9 '12 at 12:57
    
@kvanberendonck Having multiple assignment operators or constructors is not bad in itself, what is bad is having multiple implicit conversion operators from String to all those types as well. Best make those explicit or write member functions like as_int() –  TemplateRex Aug 9 '12 at 13:03

Rather than assignment operators, you probably want conversion operators—there's no way you can define an additional assignment operator for int. In your String class, you might write:

class String
{
    //  ...
public:
    String( int i );           //  Converting constructor: int->String
    operator int() const;      //  conversion operator: String->int
    //  ...
};

You can add assignment operators in addition to the first, but they generally aren't necessary except for optimization reasons.

And finally, I think you'll find this a bad idea. It's good if the goal is obfuscation, but otherwise, implicit conversions tend to make the code less readable, and should be avoided except in obvious cases (e.g. a Complex class should have a converting constructor from double). Also, too many implicit conversions will result in ambiguities in overload resolution.

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To convert your class to the other you need conversion operator. Something like this:

struct Foo
{
    operator int() const //Foo to int 
    {
        return 10;
    }

    operator=(int val) //assign int to Foo
    {

    }

    operator=(const std::string &s) //assign std::string to Foo
    {

    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. What's the purpose of the operator=() then? Also, I don't think the above works if, for example, I need to convert an integer and store it in the string buffer rather than converting my class to another value type. –  kvanberendonck Aug 9 '12 at 12:40
    
@kvanberendonck: operator=() is used to assign to Foo –  Andrew Aug 9 '12 at 12:41
    
@kvanberendonck: The first (conversion) operator allows you to write integer = string;. The second (assigment) operator allows you to write string = integer;. –  Mike Seymour Aug 9 '12 at 12:49
    
What if I need to use multiple operator=(someType x); How do I do that? –  kvanberendonck Aug 9 '12 at 12:54
1  
@kvanberendonck: you can overload operator= as any other function. I added one more operator to the example –  Andrew Aug 9 '12 at 12:54

To enable int n = a (where a is an object of your string class) you need a conversion operator.

class string {
  public:
    operator int() const { return 23; }
};

To enable conversion to your type, you need a converting assignment and possibly a conversion constructor.

class string {
  public:
    string(int i);
    string& operator=(int i);
};

You will also need overloads for const char*, char* and so on.

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