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I have the following linq expression:

AgentsFilter = new BindableCollection<NameValueGuid>((
    from firstEntry in FirstEntries
    select new NameValueGuid { 
        Name = firstEntry.Agent,
        Value = firstEntry.AgentId
    }).Distinct()
);

But because of some reason, the AgentsFilter Collection is full of duplicates. What is wrong with my Distinct()?

share|improve this question
up vote 16 down vote accepted

Distinct will use the Equals method on NameValueGuid to find duplicates. IF you do not override Equals, then it will check references.

You can add an extra step to avoid overriding Equals, by using an anonymous type. Anonymous types automatically override Equals and GetHashCode to compare each member. Doing the distinct on the anonymous type, then projecting that onto your class will solve the problem.

from firstEntry in FirstEntries
select new
{ 
    Name = firstEntry.Agent,
    Value = firstEntry.AgentId
}).Distinct().Select(x => new NameValueGuid
{
    Name = x.Name,
    Value = x.Value
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you and all others who answered. – David Shochet Aug 9 '12 at 13:36
    
Vote up for 'Distinct will use the Equals method to find duplicates. If you do not override Equals, then it will check references'. – joao.arruda Nov 14 '14 at 13:49

You might not have supplied an implementation of both GetHashCode and Equals on NameValueGuid.

Alternatively, if that isn't possible, you can pass an instance of IEqualityComparer<NameValueGuid> to your call of Distinct.

See: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.linq.enumerable.distinct.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Good explanation, but there is another solution: using anonymous types (see Cadrell0's answer) – Julien Ch. Aug 9 '12 at 13:25
    
+1, Didn't realize I needed to override GetHashCode as well for Distinct to work. After overriding it, it appears that Distinct first calls GetHashCode to determine whether it needs to call Equals. – DCShannon Feb 11 '15 at 22:49

You need to define what Distinct means in the context of a class with Name and Value properties. See MSDN.

Try the overload of Distinct that lets you provide a comparer.

For example:

AgentsFilter = new BindableCollection<NameValueGuid>((from firstEntry in FirstEntries
    select new NameValueGuid
    { 
        Name = firstEntry.Agent,
        Value = firstEntry.AgentId
    })
    .Distinct((nvg) => nvg.Value)
);

Alternatively, if you have access to the code definition of NameValueGuid, then you can override GetHashCode and Equals as appropriate for the class. Again, see MSDN

share|improve this answer
select new
{ 
    Name = firstEntry.Agent,
    Value = firstEntry.AgentId
})
.Distinct()
.Select(x => new NameValueGuid
{
    Name = x.Name,
    Value = x.Value
});
share|improve this answer

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