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I think I'm misunderstanding something, and if so, I need help..

Let's say I have the following two classes:

public abstract class Abstraction() {
   protected int number = 0;
   public void printNumber() {
       System.out.println(this.number);
       System.out.println(getNumber());
   }
   public int getNumber() {
       return this.number();
   }
}

public class Reality extends Abstraction {
   int number = 1;
   public Reality() {
       this.printNumber();
   }
}

// some other class
new Reality();

What should the output be? I'm getting 0, 0 (the code here is a bit more complicated but still the same issue). How can I get the output to be 1,1?

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4 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The number in the Reality class doesn't overwrite the number in the Abstraction class. Therefore, the Abstraction class still sees his own number value as 0.

A solution would be:

public class Reality extends Abstraction {
   public Reality() {
       number = 1;
       this.printNumber();
   }
}

Because your number in Abstraction is protected, you can access it in your Reality class.


Another example is a parameter in a method:

private int number;

public void myMethod(int number){
    number = 2;
}

Your private int number field won't be set, instead, the parameter number will be set as 2.


Finally, a word on the this and super keywords, see an edit of your classes:

public abstract class Abstraction() {
   protected int number = 0;
   public void printNumber() {
       System.out.println(this.number);
       System.out.println(getNumber());
   }
   public int getNumber() {
       return this.number();
   }
}

public class Reality extends Abstraction {
   int number = 1;
   public Reality() {
       System.out.println(number); //Will print 1
       System.out.println(this.number); //Will print 1
       System.out.println(super.number); //Will print 0
   }
}
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public class Reality extends Abstraction {
    int number = 1;
    public Reality() {
        this.printNumber();
    }
}

Above the code number is an instance variable Of class Reality and calling method of super class. In super class printNumber() method will print value of number 0 because it is initialized with 0.

If you want to get subclass variable value of number, you have to pass value as method argument as follows:

public Reality(int num) {
    this.printNumber();
}
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You could create setter methods in the abstract class:

public void setNumber(int value) {
this.number = value;
}

They way you are trying to achieve this won't work, since the variable doesn't overrite that of the super class.

I hope this helps!

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You are creating a local variable in Reality but the printNumber() method refers to the the member variable which is still 0.

If you don't create a local varible but you use the field instead like this:

number = 1;

it will be OK.

If you have problems understanding fields you can always refer to the official documentation which can be found here: Oracle java docs

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